ADVICE on this filly.
 
 

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ADVICE on this filly.

This is a discussion on ADVICE on this filly. within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        06-05-2014, 01:29 AM
      #1
    Green Broke
    ADVICE on this filly.

    Sorrel filly 1 1/2 years old

    There is the linnk to the AD. She is 1 1/2 sorrel filly. I am currently looking for a younger horse to start with the help of a trainer( so no I wouldn't be doing this fall by myself)

    Many of you may know that Sunny, the paint gelding I had, kicked me, breaking my jaw in 4 places actually( I thought it was 3), so I no longer have him... and I am looking for another horse. Dad said I could get a yearling since I had one before but sold her..

    I don't think the pictures are the best but can anyone see anything that should really worry me? Pick her apart!( if you can).

    Thanks in advance.
         
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        06-05-2014, 02:01 AM
      #2
    Started
    Well, she's kind of at the "scrawny kid" stage and she could use some groceries. I'd say she's cow-hocked but it's hard to see a lot with the photos. She probably won't be a halter horse but is actually quite pleasant looking. For $400 I'd take her home as long as she checks out when you see her.
    stevenson and barrelbeginner like this.
         
        06-05-2014, 02:05 AM
      #3
    Green Broke
    Here horses are going for super cheap. I asked the owner if she would be willing to go down in price to 275 ish( owner did say OBO and the filly has been posted on there for 14 days so will see).. possibly or close to that range because I am 17 with no job now.. haha.. I will see what she replies in the morning.:)!
         
        06-05-2014, 02:26 AM
      #4
    Teen Forum Moderator
    Not to be a stick in the mud but are you CERTAIN you want a yearling after your adult knows-not-to horse kicked and fractured you jaw? Chances are a yearling will try to kick you at least once before it learns. Will you be able to prevent it or fix it?
         
        06-05-2014, 03:45 AM
      #5
    Trained
    What Endiku said. I've been booted a few times. Never had a broken bone because of it, but I know it hurts! And I know that I won't even tolerate THREATS from my horse or anyone else's now. And I don't care what the owners of any other horses I might handle have to say about it, if a horse threatens to kick me I am going to get after it just like the alpha mare in the herd would.

    Any dangerous behaviour like kicking, biting, striking or rearing WILL result in one hard sharp whack from me, and I do not care if the owner of the animal is against hitting. I had a biter. He bit me ONCE. Never tried it again... on me. But he bit Mum many many times because she doesn't believe in hitting horses and just made him work around her in a small circle. My nearly four year old Thoroughbred kicked me once. Regretted it. Threatened on many other occasions out of fear but had well and truly gotten over her fear and was just being a witch the time she actually lashed out and got me, so where I had been patient and just ignored the threats so many times, I belted her for actually kicking me. Once, hard, and she didn't try it again.

    IF YOUR HORSE TRIES TO MISBEHAVE THE SAME WAY AFTER BEING DISCIPLINED ONCE, THE DISCIPLINE IS NOT FIRM ENOUGH.
    3ringburner likes this.
         
        06-05-2014, 03:51 AM
      #6
    Trained
    I don't see anything scary looking about her, she needs weight and probably needs deworming. Just because I H A T E dealing with other peoples screw ups and 1 1/2 years old without much handling can imply quite a few of those, maybe you should look for a little weaner. They're smaller, can't kick as hard and are less likely to be messed up by wrong handling. What I do like about this one the owner says pretty much what he's done or not done so you are going to get a pretty blank slate.
         
        06-05-2014, 10:25 AM
      #7
    Green Broke
    Okay. Thanks for your replies. I believe I would be fine with this yearling. Honestly Sunny did NOT give any warnings to kicking me

    Think about letting a horse into the pasture for the first time in spring. They jump around and kick out and buck around.. I happened to be a little too close...

    My dad still doesn't put up with that.

    The owner did say she picked up feet and what not.. She HAS been worked with. So it isn't like I am getting a wild year old horse..
         
        06-05-2014, 10:41 AM
      #8
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by barrelbeginner    
    Think about letting a horse into the pasture for the first time in spring. They jump around and kick out and buck around.. I happened to be a little too close...

    My dad still doesn't put up with that.
    As well he shouldn't! My red filly has been on box rest before and yes, getting off it sent her loopy, but she had this thing called MANNERS. Horses know EXACTLY where you are. Him kicking you was not an accident. It was disrespect of your space, plain and simple. A horse that has good manners waits until you are at a safe distance before it goes nuts.
         
        06-05-2014, 11:12 AM
      #9
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by barrelbeginner    
    Okay. Thanks for your replies. I believe I would be fine with this yearling. Honestly Sunny did NOT give any warnings to kicking me

    Think about letting a horse into the pasture for the first time in spring. They jump around and kick out and buck around.. I happened to be a little too close...
    So your horse that you sold had no history of bad behavior, injures you once in a situation that you had not trained him how to behave properly, but instead of working with him to change the behavior you sell him? Is that the plan if this filly acts up, misbehaves or hurts you too? Because she will... She is a youngster and if anything will be more inclined to act up/push boundaries than your older horse was. To me it sounds like you would be better off buying a been there/done that dead broke horse that has excellent ground manners than a youngster that knows nothing and will need extensive training. I'm honestly not trying to be mean... This is just how I see it from the situation you have described.

    For what it is worth even though I don't think a yearling is a good fit for you I do like the filly. With weight and maturity I think she will be a nice horse.
         
        06-05-2014, 11:22 AM
      #10
    Green Broke
    Okay, first. It wasn't my idea to sell him ok. It was my fathers. Yes I agree that Sunny shouldn't have done that. We have been debating selling him before as well. Not that he had any big issues anyways.
    And please stop with the I didn't train him properly. I was not the one to train him. He was NEVER the type of horse to get in my space. Disrespect before.

    MY neighbor even bought him so she could use him on trail rides.. Yes... I know he should have known better.. But he had never done anything so disrespectful as to even lift his leg to kick before.. And obviously when he DID kick me.. I in no way shape or form was able to "GET AT HIM" for it...

    ANYWAYS....

    I have had horses since I was little.. I know.. Im only 17. LIKE I said in the first post. THIS ISNT A HORSE ID BE TRAINING MYSELF. ID HAVE HELP FROM A TRAINER...

    Please.. I asked if there was anything about her you guys noticed was off.. Not if its a good idea if I get her.. that's my families decision. I do appreciate your comments though.
         

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