ADVICE on this filly. - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 17 Old 06-05-2014, 10:57 AM
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They usually don't. It's small things that tell them they don't actually have to respect you and your space. Did he ever step on your foot, or push into you with his shoulder or head? Did he ever plant himself in your face and demand scratches? Ever take a SINGLE STEP you did not ask of him when he was attached to you [lead, reins, or other means of control] and gotten away with it?

Because SOME horses [not all of them but we have one just like this] will be perfect angels when you expect and demand nothing less, but will be quite bad-mannered and even dangerous if they're allowed to get away with ANYTHING.

Incidentally I was 18 when I got my filly, 17 when I got my first weanling, but [BIG BUT] I am not the sort of person who allows any horse to even shift its weight into my space unless invited. And so my 6 month old was beautifully mannered and perfectly behaved under any and every circumstance until the day I gave her to my mother, who is nowhere near as firm as I am. She is now a rude little witch.

My nearly-four-year-old was barely handled [and it hadn't been done well, I think a farrier abused her badly] when I got her and my hard line on manners did result in quite a few panicked reactions from her. I have significantly softened with her but I still expect nothing less than perfection. I just don't get after her as hard as I did with my more stubborn horses. Quite often just a shift in my energy is plenty with her. But she KNOWS when she has done something I haven't allowed.

By the by, if she's genuinely frightened she's allowed to leap around on the end of the lead, AWAY from me, but if she takes half a step TOWARDS me or starts leaping around while she's right next to me she is in TROUBLE.

With some horses, TINY things make all the difference.

You might want to train your horses to a release command in future so they don't think they're allowed to spin and bolt and kick out. You can then get yourself into a safe spot after taking the halter off and THEN give the release command and the horse can do whatever it darn well pleases. It doesn't take long. My late gelding, 15 at the time I bought him, picked it up in two days.

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post #12 of 17 Old 06-05-2014, 11:06 AM
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I think she physically looks fine, but Temperament is probably going to be the biggest thing in this situation.

I recently had a bit of epiphany about temperament. Its bred in. to people, dogs, cats, horses. A person can rationalize, read books and talk to a therapist, animals cant. So very, very carefully evaluate temperament. I know from experience that a sound horse that's physically perfect for you will do you no good if its mentally flawed. A fearful horse is not what you want. Nor an anxious, dominant, spooky or aggressive one. These traits are very hard to see in a yearling. Its easier if you can see the parents. And contrary to popular belief, a smart horse is not good for everyone, and in your situation I think would be a bad thing.

so play with her a bit. lead, pick up her feet, see how she is to handle. Ask lots of questions. How is she with other horses? You don't want a dominant lead type. Is she willing to do what you ask? Is she curious about you, or does she just want to leave?

In a situation like this, you don't want a difficult, testing, sensitive horse. The first horse I broke was a middle of the herd type, not overly smart, very forgiving, not spooky or overly hot. I chose her myself, and she was ignored by others as "boring". She was perfect for me at the time.

As for the kick that happened, I'm sure we've all made mistakes, let our guard down a little too much, especially at 17. Take it as an important lesson in both safety and the importance of teaching respect to your horse. Everyone should learn the importance of those, its very unfortunate you had to get hurt in the process.
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post #13 of 17 Old 06-05-2014, 11:20 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by BlueSpark View Post
I think she physically looks fine, but Temperament is probably going to be the biggest thing in this situation.

I recently had a bit of epiphany about temperament. Its bred in. to people, dogs, cats, horses. A person can rationalize, read books and talk to a therapist, animals cant. So very, very carefully evaluate temperament. I know from experience that a sound horse that's physically perfect for you will do you no good if its mentally flawed. A fearful horse is not what you want. Nor an anxious, dominant, spooky or aggressive one. These traits are very hard to see in a yearling. Its easier if you can see the parents. And contrary to popular belief, a smart horse is not good for everyone, and in your situation I think would be a bad thing.

so play with her a bit. lead, pick up her feet, see how she is to handle. Ask lots of questions. How is she with other horses? You don't want a dominant lead type. Is she willing to do what you ask? Is she curious about you, or does she just want to leave?

In a situation like this, you don't want a difficult, testing, sensitive horse. The first horse I broke was a middle of the herd type, not overly smart, very forgiving, not spooky or overly hot. I chose her myself, and she was ignored by others as "boring". She was perfect for me at the time.

As for the kick that happened, I'm sure we've all made mistakes, let our guard down a little too much, especially at 17. Take it as an important lesson in both safety and the importance of teaching respect to your horse. Everyone should learn the importance of those, its very unfortunate you had to get hurt in the process.

Thanks. Yes I know. I normally don't let my horses get away with anything, but obviously with sunny I did at one point for that to occur.. I admit it. That night it just got done raining. I took him out of the pasture had not worked with him in a while, I know it's my fault. He is the type that needs consistency. And I wasn't paying as much attention as I should have.

Once again, my parents and I are going to make the final decision. IF I EVEN GET A REPLY. And I would be getting help from a trainer. So not doing this all on my own. I definately am taking your words into consideration when going to look at her.

As we recently bought a gelding from the auction, so not really looking at him and knowing too much about him... Turned into a bigger fight than what it was worth.. I am going to take my time. Explore my options.. But.. Once again.... I'm not doing this by myself..

And for sure am going to be more careful;)..
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post #14 of 17 Old 06-05-2014, 11:58 AM
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So your horse that you sold had no history of bad behavior, injures you once in a situation that you had not trained him how to behave properly, but instead of working with him to change the behavior you sell him? Is that the plan if this filly acts up, misbehaves or hurts you too?
The OP's father sold the horse. FWIW, if ANY of my horses kicked someone in the face, being sold would not have been their worry. I'd have shot him where he stood and I wouldn't have thought twice about it. That is absolutely inexcusable.

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post #15 of 17 Old 06-05-2014, 12:20 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
The OP's father sold the horse. FWIW, if ANY of my horses kicked someone in the face, being sold would not have been their worry. I'd have shot him where he stood and I wouldn't have thought twice about it. That is absolutely inexcusable.

If it were my dads personal horse he would have. But since it was my horse, my dad took him to the sale. From there I told my neighbor who had been wanting to buy him for a while, and she made a promise to buy him. She knows everything that happened, and trains horses so I believe he is better off there.

Thanks for understanding why I got rid of him, even though you would have taken a different path, other than thinking it was dumb for me to just not fix the problem or something rather like that.

The horse to my dad was not worth it. I have a $23,000 bill now.. and no way was he worth that to my dad.

If it was up to me.. Im glad we sold him. I had been thinking about selling him for a while..

Lesson learned..

As Tryst said( Sorry I dont want to go back a page to find this quote)


So your horse that you sold had no history of bad behavior, injures you once in a situation that you had not trained him how to behave properly, but instead of working with him to change the behavior you sell him? Is that the plan if this filly acts up, misbehaves or hurts you too?

How could you say I did not train him properly? Yes you could say.. HE kicked you, obviously I dont know how to train right> how do you train a horse not to kick when he has never tried? He was NEVER the type of horse to get in my bubble, get in my space, NOTHING.. listened perfectly... I actually had him where I could ride him liberty..

For me this is a in the wrong place, wrong time type deal. I don't believe he would do this again. I KNOW it is my fault for what happened at that moment..

But he was the best behaving horse I have had.. With finals and stuff with school.. I had not been spending enough time with him..

Thanks and sorry if that came off rude.. or hard to understand..

http://www.horseforum.com/member-journals/sunnys-thread-160521/ << read about Sunny and I. Our journey

Last edited by barrelbeginner; 06-05-2014 at 12:28 PM.
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post #16 of 17 Old 06-05-2014, 01:32 PM
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you should get something trained. the initial expense will soon be less, than the cost of training. accidents do happen, I hope you heal quickly, but accidents are more likely to happen with a young untrained horse.
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post #17 of 17 Old 06-05-2014, 01:46 PM
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I think she is a cute filly. She needs to mature and develop but overall she looks like a nice little horse.

If you like her in person, I see no reason to not purchase her.

Getting rid of Sunny was for the best. With his previous health/soundness/leg issues...and then the inappropriate behavior, it was time for him to go before you got even MORE seriously injured.
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