Arabian Conformation Critique
   

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Arabian Conformation Critique

This is a discussion on Arabian Conformation Critique within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        04-27-2013, 11:50 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    Arabian Conformation Critique

    I've been debating whether or not to ask for a critique for a really long time, haha. I can tell you about every tiny nuance of this horse's personality, temperament, and mentality, but I decided that I'd like to know more about him technically/ see him through a bit more of a technical viewpoint. If he has conformation that would make him not very good at one thing or another, if he has any major problems that I need to watch, etc. I really would like someone else's opinion on him. I think he's pretty darn decent, although a bit courser looks-wise than most arabians I've dealt with, but I don't really see any horrible faults. Of course, I'm extremely biased, I love this horse to the moon and back, haha.
    Anyway, this is Envi. He's a 6 year old arabian who I've owned for around 4 years now. His training has been really slow so far, but he's been fantastic about everything. He's so, so smart, and so sweet, I'm so happy to have him. I was 14 when I bought him and the fact that he's put up with my fumbling attempts to learn about training for 4 years says so much about him, haha.
    One thing I'd really like to hear opinions about is his front end/ legs... His front legs look like they turn out, and his pasterns from the front are slanted where they meet the hoof. I'm not really sure what it is, really, but something is off about it and I'm just wondering what it is and if it will be a problem.
    And please excuse the mess in the background, we were in the middle of cleaning out the shed. The inside of it looks fantastic now, unfortunately that's just because most of the clutter was dumped outside...
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg conformation envi 006.jpg (81.1 KB, 219 views)
    File Type: jpg conformation envi 025.jpg (81.3 KB, 211 views)
    File Type: jpg conformation envi 011.jpg (83.8 KB, 206 views)
    File Type: jpg conformation envi 013.jpg (45.6 KB, 200 views)
    File Type: jpg conformation envi 020.jpg (80.2 KB, 201 views)
         
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        04-28-2013, 01:50 AM
      #2
    Yearling
    Anybody?
         
        04-28-2013, 02:01 AM
      #3
    Super Moderator
    I like him too. I much prefer the heavier type of Arab, as you said "coarse", then the delicate , overly dished ones. This guy is one I'd keep. Yes , he does seem to toe out on his front, both of them but his front left more.

    His hind end is the better of the two ends. The hock is quite large and clean (no swelling or puffiness), nice angle and short canon. His back looks strong to me, though his shoulder is not as big or strong as would balance the hind end the best . The neck is kind of short and maybe a little bit thick at the throatlatch.

    Ok, now, that's all subjective, and I am no expert. Let's see what the others say. Ask Elana, she knows conformation.
         
        04-28-2013, 02:15 AM
      #4
    Yearling
    Thank you tinyliny! Will his toeing out be an issue, do you think? Would trimming help? It doesn't seem to affect him at all, but I still wonder about it.
         
        04-28-2013, 02:26 AM
      #5
    Super Moderator
    If it's the way he is formed, I think that trying to force that to change by shoeing would be a terrible mistake. I bet it is not an issue, but other folks will know more about that. Like I said, he has that sturdy, "I can do anything " look about him.

    Tell us about his personality?

    Oh, btw, my friend has a dapple gray arab gelding, and she really only started to ride him at 6. Kept him barefoot until 8. He is the sturdiest guy, the least spooky, most sensible, sure footed and personable horse at the barn. But only at about 7 or 8 did he really start to come into his own. I think he's almost 9 now.
         
        04-28-2013, 02:59 AM
      #6
    Trained
    Good bone, short, strong back.
    Thick in the throatlatch, as tinyliny said. I'd like a bit more hindend. Steep shoulder, not very comfy to sit a trot and not much extension, I bet.
    Narrow in the chest in relation to his strength of bone.
    Although it's hard to tell due to the shadows, but it looks like his feet need balancing, which will take care if the toeing out to some extent.
    I really like his expression. Nice fella.
    Does he have a swirl about halfway down the neck, below the crest? Looks like it, but his various shades of gray make it hard to say for sure
         
        04-28-2013, 04:31 AM
      #7
    Yearling
    Haha, I'd love to.... I'll try to keep this short and not ramble too much...

    He's a very, very intelligent horse (sometimes, I think his brain actually works too much and he over-thinks things... it's fun to watch the wheels turning when I work with him though, haha), and exceptionally honest and transparent. He tries very hard to learn and picks things up very fast, good or bad, unfortunately... he's exceptional when it comes to understanding things, but convincing him that something is worth learning is a bit different. And I honestly believe he could give any mule a run for it's money, he's that stubborn... he doesn't throw tantrums like my other paint gelding, he doesn't make a big deal out of it, there's no outburst or anything, he just calmly refuses to do whatever it is. This is definitely not a bad thing, though, as he's usually doing it because I'm being unfair or some such. He's definitely not unreasonable and is very cooperative, but you have to let him use his brain and think for himself, or he gets surly and confused.
    He's a problem solver, and always surprises me with his solutions to things- they're not always what I want, though, lol... it makes teaching him fun, because I never quite know what to expect from him.
    He won't turn down a scratch or a treat, but he's much more polite with other people, while he's much friendlier with me- he's tense with others, although he's always polite and gentle... definitely people-oriented, but not overly friendly like a dog... Some horses are just really big golden retrievers who love everyone equally, not him, lol.
    He loves to push buttons and see how far he can go with something, but in a playful manner, he's not domineering or aggressive- he won't take advantage of someone and is probably the most forgiving horse I've ever met. He has the brains, but needs that little bit of reassurance from someone else to really settle down into something. Probably the most sensitive horse I've ever been around. Once we get working and tuned in, all I have to do is think something and he'll do it. He takes a bit to warm up, but once he has his brain and feet going, he's fantastic. He's one of the horses that needs a quiet and contained person, he's never liked people with a lot of energy... I always kind of attributed that to his extreme sensitivity.
    He has fantastic feet, I don't see anything but barefoot in his future so far, but we'll see. That's so good to hear, I used to worry about his late start a lot... I'm kind of glad about it now, though, that he's matured physically and mentally. It's actually making things a lot easier.
    And I can't even tell you how he's changed lately, lol, he just kind of sprouted when he turned 6- he filled out and grew into himself, and mentally he's so much better. I can't wait to see how he changes in the years to come.


    -edit- and no, he doesn't have a swirl on his neck. Thank you, deserthorsewoman! We just got a new farrier, so I'll ask him about his balance next time he's out.
         
        04-28-2013, 06:43 AM
      #8
    Weanling
    I'm not going to critique, but I do want to say that the moment I saw his pictures, I thought to myself, I really like this horse, as a whole, despite the flaws.
         
        04-28-2013, 07:03 AM
      #9
    Yearling
    Wow. I'm not an Arabian fan, but I would take this guy in a heartbeat. So chunky and handsome! My favourite part is the fact that whilst he has the typical refined head, it isn't overdone like many Arabs these days. I also really like that butt.
    brookeabee123 likes this.
         
        04-28-2013, 11:26 AM
      #10
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tracer    
    Wow. I'm not an Arabian fan, but I would take this guy in a heartbeat. So chunky and handsome! My favourite part is the fact that whilst he has the typical refined head, it isn't overdone like many Arabs these days. I also really like that butt.
    I second Tracer's comment! That is a stunning little horse. He has some minor issues, but I think if he got a little more muscle on his shoulder he would balance out better! My QH gelding toes out a bit on his left front, but it's no big deal! But yeah! I really like this guy!!!
         

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