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Clubbed Foot

This is a discussion on Clubbed Foot within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Is a horse with clubbed foot bad?

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    05-21-2013, 07:21 PM
  #21
Banned
     
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    05-21-2013, 07:23 PM
  #22
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by toto    
Lol, I don't know about 'short cannon bone' but a very upright cannon bone- with a very upright coffin bone makes more sense to me.. it can also happen with bad trimming.


A horse with a choppy (short stride) from conformation faults and a horse that's short stridin because of ouchie clubbed feet are two different things.. id like to see a video just because.
TO me is seems more like a conformational fault that is causing a short stride. He is a fairly short horse as is, about 14.3. Maybe 15.0hh.

The reason I can believe this /short/ cannon bone issue is a 15 year old gelding I used to ride a year or so ago has one cannon bone shorter than the other (I really have no idea how) and it resulted in him having a grade 1 clubbed foot. Currently i'm on my way to the arena since he doesn't have a soreness kind of movement to me or the riders around me. He seems fine. I'll put a nice charge on my camera and catch you a video if that helps?
It's more so at a trot, he is a very quick paced horse and HATES moving collected and slow. Everything he does is fast. Fast trot, fast canter.
     
    05-21-2013, 07:24 PM
  #23
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by aforred    
My clubby mare has never been short strided AS LONG AS I keep her angles correct.
His angles were just fixed last Thursday. He had an actual farrier...which I believe he has never had come and trim his feet correctly.
     
    05-21-2013, 07:24 PM
  #24
Trained
My mare is not short strided at all. She actually over-reaches And bell boots are a must for any type of undersaddle/lunging work. She's very flexible, very loose. Her back feet always end up where her front feet were.

Your gelding may have other problems causing the short stride. Hips/back out of alignment. Joint problems. Conformation defect other then the clubbed foot. Improper fitting saddle. As well as improper work all together. If he's been ridden poorly for X amount of time, he may not be using his muscle pproperly.
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    05-21-2013, 07:26 PM
  #25
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
My mare is not short strided at all. She actually over-reaches And bell boots are a must for any type of undersaddle/lunging work. She's very flexible, very loose. Her back feet always end up where her front feet were.

Your gelding may have other problems causing the short stride. Hips/back out of alignment. Joint problems. Conformation defect other then the clubbed foot. Improper fitting saddle. As well as improper work all together. If he's been ridden poorly for X amount of time, he may not be using his muscle pproperly.
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Hmmm, now that you mention it, he doesn't flex his neck completely. He might actually need some chiropractic work... Most likely in his neck or poll. I have noticed he does need bell boots, I won't work him without them. I'll definitely take a really close look at him and see if there is anything that is changing up his stride. He's a fairly new horse to me, so everything about him is far different than what i'm used to.
I don't believe he was rode much, he's kind of a butt. He loves to throw his crow hops at the beginning of a ride.
     
    05-21-2013, 07:30 PM
  #26
Trained
I'd stop his work until he's seen by a chiropractor. The crow hops can be a sign of discomfort and his way of trying to tell you.

You'd be surprised by what a chiro can do for a horse.
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    05-21-2013, 07:33 PM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
I'd stop his work until he's seen by a chiropractor. The crow hops can be a sign of discomfort and his way of trying to tell you.

You'd be surprised by what a chiro can do for a horse.
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He hasn't thrown a crow hop with me in a week. He only threw them the first three or four days. The lady said it was all the time, and that he loved them. He hasn't been rode in four years so It's expected. I'm actually at this arena right now. I might just lunge him around a while or take him around the race track at a walk or trot. I'll take him easy until I get him checked out. I just want him out of that pasture and new places under saddle I suppose for now.
     
    05-21-2013, 10:11 PM
  #28
Yearling
I took him out there and trotted him around, he had no problem. Nothing. In fact, he pushed against my hands to go faster. Going to the right in a circle on his most noticeable clubbed foot, he didn't have a problem.

I checked his legs against and his feet again before I rode him, no problem. One of the trainers up there said he just seemed short strided because his legs are so short.

This coming Friday i'm taking him up to the vet to get adjusted
     
    05-21-2013, 11:41 PM
  #29
Banned
I still wanna see this horses clubbed feet and legs- do you have any pictures of him?
     
    05-22-2013, 12:09 AM
  #30
Foal
I had a mare who.had a club foot. Grade 2 but with proper trimming I got it to look better and have it straighten out somewhat. Problem arose when a farrier insisted it was ringbone and trimmed her like a ring bone horse. Breeder confirmed she had had the club foot since day one, ( I picked her up at an auction so never actually bought the mare from her) She went lame, by then a friend had bought her and was using this farrier. I told her to find someone who would trim her properly and low and behold this spring she is sound. No noticable short stride at all.I could lope her and use her on cattle all day and she would get sore after an all day move on the gravel roads. But give her a few days rest and she was good to go. I kept at her angles quite frequently when I had her, giving them a touch up every couple weeks. She was barely two when I bought her and I think my frequent trimming did help with her angles in the long run. With your guy being mature it probably.won't help much trimming frequently. I have a gelding who is a tenderfoot and limps on rocks and gravelly stuff all the time. He is fine anywhere else. Your gelding may also be a tenderfoot and have club foot... lucky you!
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