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Conformation Critique of Potential Buys Please

This is a discussion on Conformation Critique of Potential Buys Please within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        12-17-2012, 07:02 AM
      #11
    Yearling
    Agree with everyone else...neither are breeding material as they have characteristics you DO not want passed on to the foal. Sorry.
         
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        12-18-2012, 12:02 AM
      #12
    Foal
    Here are some pictures taken today of the paint stallion. What do you think of him all grown up?
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg Slick1.jpg (100.0 KB, 66 views)
    File Type: jpg Slick rear.jpg (49.8 KB, 65 views)
    File Type: jpg slick teeth.jpg 12 17 12.jpg (68.5 KB, 65 views)
         
        12-18-2012, 07:40 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Sorry...but if you are looking for a breeding stallion....I'd definitely pass on him. While he'd make a really cute gelding, nothing about him knocks my socks off about him as a stallion.
    He remains weak in the back end, his neck could be much better and he's still posty in the hind legs.

    If you have a breeding program or are starting one - the very worst thing you can do is to buy a substandard stallion. A stallion can put far more offspring on the ground than a mare...so you are talking about far more damage with a stallion.

    Very very seriously...buy the very best stallion you possibly can...even if you have to make payments or save up for a while.

    Truth be told...stallions are a PITA and can actually be detrimental to a small breeding program unless you are aggressively showing and promoting. The temptation to "save money" by breeding your mares to your own stallion rather than "breeding out" can be a big one..and in the end, a limiting one. For a small breeding program, it is actually not only cheaper to breed to a top notch stallion than to house a substandard one. This also gives you the ability to keep your gene pool diverse with produce from many different stallions.

    Just my FYI based on many years of breeding experience.

    Marie
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        12-18-2012, 07:49 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Pass....

    Duplicate post
         
        12-19-2012, 08:28 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Unfortunately I have to agree with Marie. I assume the tobiano is the son of the solid colored horse (whoms color I couldn't really tell - champagne?) because the tobiano has now, all grown up, the same short, thick neck.
    I have seen way worse breeding stallions but he really is not what you'd be looking for in a Paint. He is VERY heavy in the front, nothing in the back, I think he is pretty and has, of course, a beautiful color, but for breeding there should be a step up. Sorry, wished I could say "He is it!" because I am sure that is what wish to hear
    Honestly: if the seller doesn't even see the need to brush the mud off their horse for pictures I am wondering anyway ...
         
        12-19-2012, 08:30 AM
      #16
    Foal
    On second thought - you already bought him, didn't you?
         

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