Critique this gelding?
 
 

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Critique this gelding?

This is a discussion on Critique this gelding? within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        01-30-2013, 01:02 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Question Critique this gelding?

    I am currently looking for horses that I can possible train to jump. I emailed the owner of this guy and got these pictures. I would love opinions on him, the owner says he has an English movement. In the second picture his legs and build looks much thicker than in the under saddle picture

    photo (3).JPG

    photo (1).JPG
         
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        01-30-2013, 01:12 AM
      #2
    Foal
    Just me, but this isn't a horse I would hope to do a lot of jumping. Kinda weak in the rear, heavy in front, thick and stocky, hard to collect with that low neck set. He could do some, but not show ring . On the trail, oh yeah. My opinions no doubt come from east coast prejudice on jumpers tho.
    Nokotaheaven likes this.
         
        01-30-2013, 10:22 PM
      #3
    Green Broke
    Those pics are hard to judge, but from what I can see, he's got a decent shoulder
    Sufficient depth through the chest
    Neck is not too bad but he is heavy on the forehand
    Back is a good length but looks like it may sway
    Nice hindquarters
    Very posty in the back legs and possibly cowhocked
         
        01-30-2013, 11:02 PM
      #4
    Yearling
    In the under saddle photo he almost looks slightly back at the knee too, though it could just be the angle, as it doesn't look that way in the 2nd photo. I agree he is very posty behind.
         
        01-31-2013, 02:22 AM
      #5
    Foal
    Not an optimal mount for jumping:)
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        01-31-2013, 07:41 AM
      #6
    Trained
    JMHO, but even if a horse is "built" for jumping does not mean they have the ability. All horses can "jump", but not all do it well. Some are actually horrible at it-I have one! Some jump like deer, some just do not know where their legs are, etc. To post a picture of a horse under a western saddle and ask if it can jump is a bit silly, IMO. Noone knows or can tell you without seeing it jump(or at least MOVE) and how it handles itself. Just because the owner says it has "english movement" (not even sure what they mean by that, since it could mean so many things, all of which are subjective)does not make it so. You cannot tell much about ANY horse by a picture of it standing there.
    smrobs likes this.
         
        01-31-2013, 01:58 PM
      #7
    Green Broke
    To be a jumper a horse needs certain physical attributes. One attribute is a shoulder that lays back and a correct angle at the point of shoulder. The neck cannot be too low but rather that than too high.. Correct is what you really want. Correct shoulder and neck placement will allow the horse to raise his knees and lower his head over the fence.

    Next we move to the back. You want withers that smoothly tie into the back and a back that ties in smoothly to the hind quarters. Too short and the horse physically cannot have scope over the fence.. you want a back that can stretch out (along with the neck and head that can reach down as the knees come up).

    Last we get to the hind quarters. You need power. Not over powered or a diaper butt (like some Quarter horses). You need plenty of muscle and proper angles. Too little angle (posty) and the horse cannot coil the hind leg and spring over the jump (the hind leg is constructed like a spring) and too much angle and the horse cannot release enough power at the end of the spring.

    Beyond that, the horse needs adequate bone, correct front legs, not be tied at the knee and to be balanced over all (not front end heavy).

    A good jumping horse needs to have very good conformation. That is where you START.
    Next, the horse must have the correct mind....

    Some good jumpers have over come incorrect conformation with a great mind and desire to jump. Having both correct mind and conformation is the best way to have success.

    This horse does have some nice attributes.. but over all he does not look like he will be a scopey jumper.
         
        01-31-2013, 02:39 PM
      #8
    Trained
    Guess it depends upon how you define "jump". Guess I want one who has enough ability to do it safely, not just be able to make it over an obstacle no matter how. I go to some eventing shows, since I have a friend who competes in eventing, and I cannot stand to watch the stadium. Some of those horses scare the he%% out of me with the way they jump. Nothing short of scary. Certainly different than a traditional hunter jumper type horse.
         
        01-31-2013, 02:55 PM
      #9
    Weanling
    He looks cute to me despite his conformation flaws. If he has a good temperament he'll probably do anything for you
         
        01-31-2013, 03:23 PM
      #10
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by franknbeans    
    Guess it depends upon how you define "jump". Guess I want one who has enough ability to do it safely, not just be able to make it over an obstacle no matter how. I go to some eventing shows, since I have a friend who competes in eventing, and I cannot stand to watch the stadium. Some of those horses scare the he%% out of me with the way they jump. Nothing short of scary. Certainly different than a traditional hunter jumper type horse.
    Oh yes. THAT I understand. Most horses can jump 2 feet pretty safely.. but you really need to train.

    Stadium jumping requires a horse that can collect and extend and a rider that knows how to help the horse find his "spot."

    I have never understood the lack of training I have seen in some horses that are out there jumping.. fairly big and complicated jumps. Jumping a horse is dangerous with a well trained horse and rider team. Hit the undo button on either half of that equation and then add speed and jump height.. and it is a wonder there aren't more fatal wrecks (horse and human).
         

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