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Critique my mare

This is a discussion on Critique my mare within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Critique coloured filly
  • Light boned welsh d

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    12-11-2011, 03:55 PM
  #21
Yearling
You want to breed for a hardy horse, not necessarily a showy horse, right? I'd like to see recent pictures of the stallion, personally I don't think he's bad. I did first notice his bum, but I don't see it as a problem as much. Although I did grow up with cow-type, working quarter horses so I'm a bit jaded towards being bum high, haha...

That filly is really bum high, but she's young, and once again, it's not something I see as a problem to deter you.
I understand what you mean, every breed seems to be going for that flashy showy light boned type, less of the heavy workers now.
The issues that seem to be coming up all seem like they're issues that depend on the person, but don't really matter. I think that if you feel like this is the best stallion, go for it if you're ready. Breed the best horse you can for YOU, and if the looks aren't the best, you can work on those later, when you KNOW you have what you want in other aspects. Because the whole point in this is for a horse for you, to continue breeding to make the horse that's perfect for you specifically, right? Not one you plan on selling or making a profit, so being up to anyone's standards but yours doesn't really matter, IMO. If your mare is proven to have good performance and works well for you, despite her faults, and same for the stallion, you'll be fine.
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    12-11-2011, 05:27 PM
  #22
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clava    
...but you want a riding horse don't you, not a draft? A show heavyweight cob?

Welsh D's have an extravagant movement with a high leg action but is shouldn't be stiff (maybe they had saddle fit problems the ones you tried)

Fitting a saddle to a bum high short coupled horse is indeed a nightmare and really isn't the conformation you want in any riding horse. Is that stallion still a baby and growing? Is that why it is mum high? If so it being that shape may not be an issue as it grows.
Yep on all accounts...
I only speak as I find with what available to me here :)....Not alot in heavy body, big bone department - there's only one show over here that even has a Cob section & the hunter ring is FULL of FULL TBs - so solid isnt something that happens here to any real degree :(
The welsh we have here are either not very good quality (they keep throwing horses who have tiny quarters which look a size to small for the horse they are attached too- this happens even with the 2 good stallions we have here), or of the 2 that might be fine to use 1 is too darn tall, the other WAY too small for what I'm looking for in a stallion (spoken to their owners & both felt I had little chance of getting what I'm after using their stallion- one said type maybe but would only mature 14hh-14.2hh max the other is a modern welsh so lacks depth throught the body & I'd be lucky to get a solid Dressage type WB rther than Hunter or Cob type- foal would also likely mature 15.3hh+ as his smallest is 16hh to smaller mares than mine)
     
    12-11-2011, 06:20 PM
  #23
Trained
I believe with AI, the conception rate is higher than live cover. In fact here in my part of the world, no one, except ranches, does live cover. I don't even think there is a stallion standing to outside mares anywhere near. So you might want to check into that so you can get the breeding you want & your mare deserves.
     
    12-11-2011, 06:21 PM
  #24
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clava    
Several of the horses in the links you posted are seriously over weight.

Short coupled is not a strong back when combined with it being bum high as well. I understand you wanting something smaller, I'm short too and last year I was in exactly the same position as you and I was looking at breeding my beautiful TB mare with the same type of stallion for a while but along with others (here is a very long thread about the discussion Husbands for Belle)

I can't really help with what is available in your country, but I think you need to look for more bone and a better overall conformation.
Thanks for trying with that link, but those stallions are the total opposite of what I'm looking for (I only went a far as page 4, then had enough of all the WB types lol)- I want full pony height stallion with massive deep body & a min of 10 & 1/2" bone (so the opposite of what you wanted as well lol) :)
     
    12-11-2011, 06:37 PM
  #25
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by waresbear    
I believe with AI, the conception rate is higher than live cover. In fact here in my part of the world, no one, except ranches, does live cover. I don't even think there is a stallion standing to outside mares anywhere near. So you might want to check into that so you can get the breeding you want & your mare deserves.
Over here our horses still tend to live in LARGE paddocks/blocks & run in herds ranging from 2-5horses on small 4h blocks to 70+horses on the larger 80+h blocks - there's nothing better for breeding strong stock than the side of a mountain is pretty much the thought ;).
Live cover has the highest success rate here due to their lifestyles & the fact we like to turn them out on steep country for the first few years of their lives, many are out there until 4-6yrs old- those that are strong live, those that arent don't. I'd use those stallions however that means letting my mare go wild on 10,000+ acres, so not something I'm in any hurry to do!
Due to the way they are kept they are extremely well adjusted animals & we don't tend to get mares who panic when introduced to a stallion, in fact many stallions here are left to run with the mares so it is all natural with the horses deciding for themselves when the time is right with a 99% success rate (only very rearly does a mare not get in foal & you can go years between them). This way young horses learn the rules of life from the older horses & the horses thrive on it, BUT they can & do stress when AI is used & sometimes even when serving in hand is used, as its something they have no experience with & is as foreign as having a rider on their backs that 1st time. Over here they tend to grow up on the hills & watch their mothers & older mare herd mates being courted & served by stallions who know what to do as they'd in turn watched other stallions serving mares as foals.
Very very few people over here do anything other than live cover, though I know a few do offer AI so I guess it will increase as more imported horses come in.
     
    01-03-2012, 11:54 PM
  #26
Foal
Some people sure know how to bash other peoples horses... find it interesting how some people know how to critique soooo many different breeds
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    01-04-2012, 01:43 AM
  #27
Trained
Herd breeding is natural. However, I know of no one here aside from owners who have little bands of miniature horses that herd breed. Fact-live cover (excluding herd breeding because face it, that's just not practical in this day & age) is 60% success, AI is %75 success rate in conceiving.
     
    01-04-2012, 04:56 PM
  #28
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by waresbear    
Herd breeding is natural. However, I know of no one here aside from owners who have little bands of miniature horses that herd breed. Fact-live cover (excluding herd breeding because face it, that's just not practical in this day & age) is 60% success, AI is %75 success rate in conceiving.
Maybe in in your area & with the practices of your area these stats hold up - not here.
     
    01-04-2012, 05:20 PM
  #29
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowboy1393    
Some people sure know how to bash other peoples horses... find it interesting how some people know how to critique soooo many different breeds
Lol -Something I've noted as well, most I've taken with a grain of salt I promise ;)

I've had years of experience buying diamonds in the rough & almost never spend over a couple of hundred on a horse, yet all have turned out to be multiple discipline champions & have on-sold for thousands in under a year, so when people make statements I know to be plain false or correct in theory but wrong in reality, I'll say my piece & if the message isn't received, leave it :)

I was asked the other day to look at a paso fino for someone however as I have no idea of the breeds confo regarding soundness & their unique gaits I said they'd be better talking to the breeder, as I could only tell them if the horse was sore or lame - I know the breed has very different shaped feet & structural angles from what I'm used to.

Thanks to those that offered help in links to stallions :) .... as this has basically been a useless exercise I wont bother posting in here again.
     
    01-04-2012, 05:35 PM
  #30
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by soenjer55    
You want to breed for a hardy horse, not necessarily a showy horse, right? I'd like to see recent pictures of the stallion, personally I don't think he's bad. I did first notice his bum, but I don't see it as a problem as much. Although I did grow up with cow-type, working quarter horses so I'm a bit jaded towards being bum high, haha...

That filly is really bum high, but she's young, and once again, it's not something I see as a problem to deter you.
I understand what you mean, every breed seems to be going for that flashy showy light boned type, less of the heavy workers now.
The issues that seem to be coming up all seem like they're issues that depend on the person, but don't really matter. I think that if you feel like this is the best stallion, go for it if you're ready. Breed the best horse you can for YOU, and if the looks aren't the best, you can work on those later, when you KNOW you have what you want in other aspects. Because the whole point in this is for a horse for you, to continue breeding to make the horse that's perfect for you specifically, right? Not one you plan on selling or making a profit, so being up to anyone's standards but yours doesn't really matter, IMO. If your mare is proven to have good performance and works well for you, despite her faults, and same for the stallion, you'll be fine.
You are my last post here- as I happen to read your post before leaving :) You are bang on in your assessment of my situation- someone who uses logic & listens, I like that :)
I have found another stallion also a gypsy (fresh import) but waiting on conformation photos & bone measurements- I'm hoping this boy isnt as bum high as it does make for saddle fitting nightmares lol He's also a solid coloured silver dapple which I also like as I'm not a fan of pintos as a rule either ;)
Yes the foal will be for me & me alone & if not quite what I want conformation wise, she'll be put to a stallion that complements her without loosing the bone, body & cob/hunter type I want.
     

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