Critique Un-Araby Arab - Page 2
 
 

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Critique Un-Araby Arab

This is a discussion on Critique Un-Araby Arab within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Hamdani horse
  • Branches of dahman shawaniah

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    01-08-2012, 03:01 PM
  #11
Trained
Khemosabi is well known for producing good using animals and Khemo is well known for his great temper which he passed on. His tail female line is Daman Shawaniah in strain and they tend to have very dry heads.

Here's a description of the Daman horse:
The Dahman strain resembles somewhat the Abayyan and Saqlawi (related) strains in elegance but with more of the strength of the Kuhaylan. It is an intermediate blend of the Kuhaylan with the Saqlawi-Abayyan type. The head is short and broad like the Kuhaylan but with more bulge and jibah. They are compact with lines more like the Kuhaylan but with more over all refinement. They are of medium build usually with dry, flatbone.
The Dahman strain is presently represented by only one female line, that of *Sawannah imported from Bahrain in 1954. The line is carried on through her daughter, *Hadriya by the previously mentioned, *Jalam Al Ubayan. This line descends from a Dahmah mare of Sheikh Sulman bin Hamid al Khalifa, ruler of Bahrain. The Al Khalifa family has occupied the island country of Bahrain since 1783 and they were originally from a branch of the Anazah confederation.
Strain breeding is an art, as well as encompassing the science of equine reproduction. Any blend of several strain types may be suitable for various horses under certain conditions. A study of the various original Bedouin strain types is useful for both preserving these types in their own form or for breeding blends for specific preferences.

Your horse also has Abayyan, in Cashvan's lines.
     
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    01-08-2012, 03:09 PM
  #12
Trained
I like my horses a little rounder through the flank and hip than your boy is. Like I said, he's not thin, I just think he could use a weeee bit more and some of that could be muscling rather than just putting on weight.

     
    01-08-2012, 03:19 PM
  #13
Started
He looks all arab to me, and the kind of arab I like- not the ones who look like they're going to break down if you actually ask them to run 50 miles. His front feet look a little funny to me, like they're flaring at the toe?
     
    01-08-2012, 04:09 PM
  #14
Foal
Looks like an anglo type arab to me, better butt, functional face( super dishy faces make me think dental problems.....idk squished teeth....no proof just my personal thoughts)and GOOD bone. The point to having a tabletop croup is lost on me, doesnt that limit their scope of ability quite a bit? His croup looks proportioned without having that wierd "triangle leg" that I see on alot of typey arabs.looks like he's an awesome boy, good luck!
     
    01-08-2012, 04:16 PM
  #15
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by natisha    
This can be a very dangerous way to free work a horse
I have a halter under the bridle, and a lunge line is attached. (I haven't gotten to the point of free lunging yet) but yes, I know the reins just lying their was extremely stupid, and dangerous for the horse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BarrelracingArabian    
I like him a lot he reminds me a ton of my boy. I think he looks fine weight wise and I love the sturdy look. His face definitely shows the arab, most of our arabs don't have the dainty little halter heads so its perfectly fine :]
I like a sturdier Arab also (: But I also like the dainty halter heads of some of the picture perfect ones. They are a sight to behold!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
Khemosabi is well known for producing good using animals and Khemo is well known for his great temper which he passed on. His tail female line is Daman Shawaniah in strain and they tend to have very dry heads.

Here's a description of the Daman horse:
The Dahman strain resembles somewhat the Abayyan and Saqlawi (related) strains in elegance but with more of the strength of the Kuhaylan. It is an intermediate blend of the Kuhaylan with the Saqlawi-Abayyan type. The head is short and broad like the Kuhaylan but with more bulge and jibah. They are compact with lines more like the Kuhaylan but with more over all refinement. They are of medium build usually with dry, flatbone.
The Dahman strain is presently represented by only one female line, that of *Sawannah imported from Bahrain in 1954. The line is carried on through her daughter, *Hadriya by the previously mentioned, *Jalam Al Ubayan. This line descends from a Dahmah mare of Sheikh Sulman bin Hamid al Khalifa, ruler of Bahrain. The Al Khalifa family has occupied the island country of Bahrain since 1783 and they were originally from a branch of the Anazah confederation.
Strain breeding is an art, as well as encompassing the science of equine reproduction. Any blend of several strain types may be suitable for various horses under certain conditions. A study of the various original Bedouin strain types is useful for both preserving these types in their own form or for breeding blends for specific preferences.

Your horse also has Abayyan, in Cashvan's lines.
Goodness, I had to read that like 10 times before understanding it! It was like another language But I still don't get what "strain breeding" is?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
I like my horses a little rounder through the flank and hip than your boy is. Like I said, he's not thin, I just think he could use a weeee bit more and some of that could be muscling rather than just putting on weight.

Beautiful Arab!!! So in halter, do you have to have their back feet square also? Or only their front? His muscling is coming along nicely, he gets lunged about once a day, we jump about every other day, do grids, and random exercises. Also, his winter fuzz seems to bury some of his muscle, as in his summer photos, he looks packed full of muscle. But, also I havent been working with him as much as I was in the summer months.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharpie    
He looks all arab to me, and the kind of arab I like- not the ones who look like they're going to break down if you actually ask them to run 50 miles. His front feet look a little funny to me, like they're flaring at the toe?
Hehe, yes, he is a heft boy! Before I purchased him, and seen his papers, I was told he was a Anglo Arab, but looking at his papers, their is no such chance. But I would have guessed QH/Arab when looking at him for the first time
     
    01-08-2012, 04:19 PM
  #16
Yearling
I like him. If you get tired of him, send him my way. You can't beat a sturdy arab.
     
    01-08-2012, 04:28 PM
  #17
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverShadowStable    
Re: his skin. Arabs are noted for their fine skin and dry facial features. This is noted in the summer because they can shed on their face much more than other breeds. Some arabs can even be pretty much whiskerless. Hence the look of the shaved face for halter. Some take years to dry out on their face, and some are like that since foals, but you can easily see well defined tear bones, even muscle definition on jowls, defined eye sockets and every wrinkle in their skin. I did not really understand the description until I bought a stallion who was extreme on the fine dry face features. He had tiny sparse whiskers, barely any face hair in summer and a network of small veins that were close to the surface of his skin on his body that popped out without a work out. When he got old I could see all the extra wrinkles. If you took your guy, shaved just his muzzle whiskers and oiled his face lightly, he would look pretty showy without any of the face shaving other Arabs have to go through. He has nice length of ears too.
Posted via Mobile Device
So, having a dry face is a good thing?
     
    01-08-2012, 04:31 PM
  #18
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by grayshell38    
I like him. If you get tired of him, send him my way. You can't beat a sturdy arab.
Haha, I will get tired of him at the same time pigs learn to fly Have fun getting him in the trailer to take him away
     
    01-08-2012, 06:13 PM
  #19
Trained
Strains are determined by the tale female line of the dam, so your boy's strain is Kuhaylan Rodania, since his dam goes to Rodania, one of the foundation mares of Arabian breeding. Their are 5 predominant strains today, Kuhaylan which explains his more masculine look, they tend to be heavier built. Khemosabi was Dahman which explains your boys dryer features. The Bedouins USED to breed pure in the strain, which means that every line would trace back to a Kuhaylan horse in your boy's case. They considered horses 'not pure in the strain' to not be purebred Arabians, or not 'Asil'. For outcross purposes pure in the strain breeding isn't used so much today.

Here's a small snippet about strains from the Arabian Horse Association Website:

The Bedouin valued pure in strain horses above all others, and many tribes owned only one main strain of horse. The five basic families of the breed, known as "Al Khamsa", include Kehilan, Seglawi, Abeyan, Hamdani and Hadban. Other, less "choice" strains include Maneghi, Jilfan, Shuwayman, and Dahman. Substrains developed in each main strain, named after a celebrated mare or Sheik that formed a substantial branch within the main strain.

A great story of courage, endurance, or speed always accompanied the recitation of the genealogy of the sub-strain, such as the great Kehilet al Krush, the Kehilet Jellabiyat and the Seglawi of Ibn Jedran. Each of these mares carried with them stories of great battles and intrigue. Their daughters were sought after by the most powerful Kings but often remained unattainable. Daughters and granddaughters of these fabled mares changed hands through theft, bribery and deceit. If any of their descendants were sold, the prices were legendary.

Each strain, when bred pure, developed characteristics that could be recognized and identified. The Kehilan strain was noted for depth of chest, masculine power and size. The average pure in strain Kehilan stood up to 15 hands. Their heads were short with broad foreheads and great width in the jowls. Most common colors were gray and chestnut.
The Seglawi was known for refinement and almost feminine elegance. This strain was more likely to be fast rather than have great endurance. Seglawi horses have fine bone, longer faces and necks than the Kehilan. The average height for a Seglawi would be 14.2 hands, the most common color Bay.

The Abeyan strain is very similar to the Seglawi. They tended to be refined. The pure in strain Abeyan would often have a longer back than a typical Arabian. They were small horses, seldom above 14.2 hands, commonly gray and carried more white markings than other strains.

Hamdani horses were often considered plain, with an athletic if somewhat masculine, large boned build. Their heads were more often straight in profile, lacking an extreme Jibbah. The Hamdani strain was one of the largest, standing as much as 15.2 hands. The common colors were gray and bay.

The Hadban strain was a smaller version of the Hamdani. Sharing several traits including big bone and muscular build. They were also known for possessing an extremely gentle nature. The average height of a Hadban was 14.3 hands, the primary color brown or bay with few if any white markings.


Most of our modern horses today are a mix of the various strains and so you see many different characteristics that trace to the various strains with one or another usually being predominant.
     
    01-09-2012, 01:31 AM
  #20
Trained
Somehow I got lost before I could answer your halter question. In Arabian Main Ring Halter (vs. Sport Horse in Hand which is a whole 'nuther ballgame), the front feet should be just a tiny bit in front of the shoulder and very slightly split is ok, the back feet should be split (one farther in front of the other) but not to the point where the horse isn't bearing weight on all four feet.



In this picture, Cloney should have is front feet about 1/2 step further forward and his back left foot, he's just starting to "cheat" on by sneaking the weight onto the toe and not keeping his foot completely flat.

Ideally, he should be rocked further back on his haunches so that his neck would come up straighter out of his shoulders and then break at the poll to reach for the whip or hand that's being used as his 'target'.

If I can ever figure out how to get some pics from my phone onto photobucket I'll try to post the ones I took at Nationals this year, he was standing a lot better there.

Here's a pic of him as a yearling, just before Scottsdale, he's standing a LOT better here.
     

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