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Donkey Conformation??

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  • How to judge the conformation of a donkey

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    12-07-2013, 04:28 AM
  #11
Trained
[QUOTE=Spellcheck]I've heard that during the winter they should be fed 3/4 grass hay and 1/4 straw, but I don't really feel comfortable feeding anything that much straw, and my horse(s) and other livestock can't have it, so I've just been feeding a straight low-nutrition grass hay, not the richer kind like timothy grass or orchard grass. My mare is also an easy keeper, but I've had to supplement her with a little grain and alfalfa pellets to make up for the gaps in the grass hay diet.[\quote]

Straw can be high in nsc too, as with grass hay & grain, etc. 'Poor' quality & native grass hay - compared to 'good improved' types are generally lower & therefore better for Horses. Donk may need restricting tho android grazing muzzle one option. Regardless of hay quality its likely deficient in nutrients, so supping appropriately is beneficial. Grain doesn't give much nutrition though & alfalfa may be too high in calcium, energy, etc, esp for a donkey. Id opt for a good min supp that was palatable alone or with very little feed.

Not very fat by donkey standards? Well considering the amount of grossly obese donkeys, I'd have to agree& I wouldn't call her obese either, winter coat may also be disguising a bit, but considering the very serious health probs common to overweigh animals I wouldn't be sweating but would be taking measures
     
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    12-07-2013, 04:29 AM
  #12
Trained
Also agree not sway backed n good looking
     
    12-07-2013, 02:24 PM
  #13
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChitChatChet    
She needs her feet trimmed by somebody who know donkey feet.

From the pictures they don't look the correct angle especially the front right one

She looks swaybacked which isn't normal for a donkey IMO
I had a farrier come out just about a bit after I got her actually. He said that that was the natural angle of her feet, and that donkey feet can be a lot taller. The john that came with her had almost no angle to his feet. The farrier fixed that a bit, but for the most part that's how they were supposed to be :) Donkey feet grow a lot slower too, but she is due for another trim soon.
Believe me, before he told me that I was freaking out about their feet and thought they would be lame lol :)

I did notice the slightly more swayed back than is normal. I think it's a mixture of being long backed and having had a foal before. According to her teeth (which I'm just assuming is close enough to a horse) she's about 10-15. I'm working on stretches to strengthen and straighten her back like I have been for my mare, who is also long backed (though not swaybacked yet). Honestly though, I'm thankful for the slight swayback, as long as it doesn't impair her, because it will hold a saddle a bit better.

Thanks! :)
     
    12-08-2013, 01:42 AM
  #14
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spellcheck    
He said that that was the natural angle of her feet, and that donkey feet can be a lot taller. The john that came with her had almost no angle to his feet. The farrier fixed that a bit, but for the most part that's how they were supposed to be :) Donkey feet grow a lot slower too,
Can't judge her feet fairly from those angles & hoof pics as per the link in my signature line are needed if you want hoof critique. Oh, forgot but a friend has a good website with a page on donkey hooves, if you would like to look; donkey hoofcare

They shouldn't be taller but can be steeper/broken forward in appearance. If they're tall, as in frog off the ground, that's not correct. They should still conform to the basic principles that apply to horses, & as for horses, hoof balance & what else may be happening in the body will govern angles to a fair degree. *Unhealthy* hooves of donkeys & horses grow a lot slower, but donk hooves don't necessarily grow any different rate at all IMO, it's down to health & supply & demand(You don't use it, you won't grow it). Generally I find the same average trim schedule applies as for a horse - 3-6 weekly is ideal.

Quote:
Honestly though, I'm thankful for the slight swayback, as long as it doesn't impair her, because it will hold a saddle a bit better.
Unfortunately, while I wouldn't call it swayed, it is a weaker back than straight, so actuall LESS fit to be ridden. If you mean the shape of a saddle, you will need to get one specially fitted, or use a treeless, because it will damage her back to put on a badly fitting horse saddle, particularly onto an already weak back. I'd want to build her up a bit first, before riding much, as well as ensure her feet were in good shape.
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    12-08-2013, 02:27 AM
  #15
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
They shouldn't be taller but can be steeper/broken forward in appearance. If they're tall, as in frog off the ground, that's not correct.



Unfortunately, while I wouldn't call it swayed, it is a weaker back than straight, so actuall LESS fit to be ridden. If you mean the shape of a saddle, you will need to get one specially fitted, or use a treeless, because it will damage her back to put on a badly fitting horse saddle, particularly onto an already weak back. I'd want to build her up a bit first, before riding much, as well as ensure her feet were in good shape.
Sorry, I should have been a little more clear :) When I said "taller" I actually meant "less angled" lol First word that came to mind :P
Thanks for the link! :)

With the swayback, I was more referencing the problem a lot of donkeys and mules have with the saddle sliding right over their shoulders and down their neck. I'd probably end up needing a saddle breeching anyway, but the slightly curved back should help.
     
    12-08-2013, 03:05 PM
  #16
Foal
Really cute
     
    12-08-2013, 07:34 PM
  #17
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spellcheck    
With the swayback, I was more referencing the problem a lot of donkeys and mules have with the saddle sliding right over their shoulders and down their neck. I'd probably end up needing a saddle breeching anyway, but the slightly curved back should help.
Yep, breeching or crupper will fix that
     
    12-08-2013, 07:52 PM
  #18
Yearling
From the pictures you have, I don't see any fat pad, which is good. Once they have them, it's almost impossible to get them off. Slow feeder nets are a godsend for donkey owners. My mini donks only get 1 flake a day in their slow feeders. Donkey hoofs are more upright than horses & finding a farrier that understands the correct conformation for donkey feet is very improtant!
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