Front Leg Conformation Paint Gelding - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Conformation Critique

Front Leg Conformation Paint Gelding

This is a discussion on Front Leg Conformation Paint Gelding within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Horses with calf knees horses
  • Images horse back at knee

Like Tree5Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-05-2013, 06:43 PM
  #11
Green Broke
He looks to be back at the knee. Hard to say in this photo. But.. consider this, a horse that would rate 100% conformationally correct, would not be useable.
And for those who immediately wish to disagree, then explain why Halter horses, whom are soo pretty to look at, are not used for hard competions.
He looks to be a cute nice horse. Some groceries and muscles and he could be really nice. Also, I do have to comment, whats with the tiny buckets on the fence, I do hope you have a larger water trough !
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-05-2013, 08:13 PM
  #12
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenson    
He looks to be back at the knee. Hard to say in this photo.

Definitely not back at the knee, he's actually very slightly over at the knee.

But.. consider this, a horse that would rate 100% conformationally correct, would not be useable.

Not sure where you're getting that idea. The whole idea behind "correct conformation" is to create a horse that's going to stay sound and healthy.

And for those who immediately wish to disagree, then explain why Halter horses, whom are soo pretty to look at, are not used for hard competions.
Halter horses are about a billion light years away from having correct conformation. They have been bred for decades for nothing but muscle mass and tiny heads...at the expense of their bone mass, their feet, their hock/pastern angles, their shoulder angles, and their usability.

If you ask any real horseman that doesn't make their money from breeding/selling halter bred horses, they'll tell you the same.
Wallaby, Sahara, Elana and 1 others like this.
     
    05-05-2013, 10:42 PM
  #13
Yearling
Smrobs, I'm curious, could you possibly show me how he's slightly over at the knee and not back? I thought he was back at the knee too, and would like to know where my error was. I'm not questioning you or anything, I'd just really like to know what I was seeing wrong so that I can be more accurate in the future.
     
    05-05-2013, 10:56 PM
  #14
Showing
No, it's all good .

The more I think about it though, the more I think it may just be a difference in terminology/understanding.

This is what I consider "back at the knee", AKA "calf kneed". The front of the leg has a convex profile where the knee is behind the line from fetlock to the center of the elbow joint.



And this is what I call "over at the knee" or "buck kneed", which is what I see to a slight degree in the OP's horse. That's where the knee is in front of the elbow/fetlock line
     
    05-05-2013, 11:10 PM
  #15
Yearling
I see! I always thought that "back at the knee" was when that part behind the knee stuck out more than normal, if that makes sense... I googled it though and it was a stupid mistake on my part . I don't know where I got that LOL. Sorry OP!
     
    05-06-2013, 12:44 AM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
No, it's all good .

The more I think about it though, the more I think it may just be a difference in terminology/understanding.

This is what I consider "back at the knee", AKA "calf kneed". The front of the leg has a convex profile where the knee is behind the line from fetlock to the center of the elbow joint.



And this is what I call "over at the knee" or "buck kneed", which is what I see to a slight degree in the OP's horse. That's where the knee is in front of the elbow/fetlock line
In person he looks way more like horse 1. Let me get a better picture. Hold on.
     
    05-06-2013, 03:37 AM
  #17
Green Broke
The photos show the back at knee ... the OP horse is slightly back at the knee.
The halter hosrses are sposed to be the cream of the crop the ideal horse, the horses for cutting are bred tiny legged and butt high.. also tiny footed .
A lot of them are barely 14 hands , or at least the ones in this area, and are the HOT ticket. Breeders breed for what sales for what is popular and latest fad, or they would not be in business,
     
    05-06-2013, 03:47 AM
  #18
Green Broke
I agree with smrobs, over at the knee.

I also disagree that halter horses are bred to be perfect. They are bred to fit current fashion, I.e. Huge bodies with a large amount of muscle mass and tiny babydoll heads with fine legs and itty bitty feet. Fat and dainty, hmmm? Rofl
smrobs likes this.
     
    05-06-2013, 04:41 AM
  #19
Green Broke
Maybe a diff photo. I still don't see Over.
Horses today, are bred for what the people find appealling or in style and if the breeders don't go with what is popular then they would be oob
     
    05-06-2013, 08:15 AM
  #20
Green Broke
This horse has correct knees.. Perhaps slightly over. Nothing wrong with this horse's knees. I would not call him tied at the knee either. The knee joint has a Boney process that is more prominent in some horses than others. This horse is prominent. Tied at the knee shows a noticeable narrowing from fetlock to knee. That is not going on here.

I would like to see better photos of this horse. He looks to be a bit light in bone and to stand over a lot of ground. Lovely low hocks and knees and an adequate shoulder. Neck appears to tie in nicely at the top and he has nice withers. Looks a good one... But show us more please.
     

Tags
barrel, knee, potential, tied

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Limping right front leg :/ happytrailstoyou Horse Health 8 12-16-2012 12:26 PM
Front Leg Splints?? BlueSpark Horse Health 1 06-21-2012 04:33 PM
Right front leg limping Diegosmom Horse Health 11 10-20-2011 11:50 PM
Critique Paint Gelding's Conformation Ninaa01 Horse Riding Critique 5 02-13-2011 12:25 AM
front leg crossover help Angel_Leaguer Horse Training 2 07-30-2009 09:34 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0