High Bum?
 
 

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High Bum?

This is a discussion on High Bum? within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Horses withers lower than butt
  • My mare is higher in the hindend than withers is she still growing

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    05-23-2012, 11:25 AM
  #1
Foal
Question High Bum?

This is my 5yr old Quarter Horse and



His bum is higher than his withers. I'm pretty sure he is still growing because he just turned 5 but isn't kinda late for him to still be growing? Will his withers eventually be higher? I really want to jump him but I don't think I really should start teaching him because I don't want him to get arthritis... oh and also he has this clicking in his hock when ever he walks and people told me it might be because his bum is putting alotta pressure on his hock so that's making it click? Another person said she had a horse that had that clicking its whole life and never meant anything...what do you think it is?
     
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    05-23-2012, 04:49 PM
  #2
Trained
At 5, he's more the likely done growing. He may fill out more, he may not.but he will probably always be butt high.

From what I understand, you actually don't want an uphill horse for jumping.

As for the clicking hocks, talk to your vet. I'd get a soundness exam before starting jumping. But 5 is plenty old to start a horse on ground poles and popping over X rails.
     
    05-23-2012, 07:23 PM
  #3
Green Broke
He could still grow at age 5. Not alot but some. Depends on the horse.
I agree popping/clicking noise in hocks should be checked by a Vet
     
    05-23-2012, 08:53 PM
  #4
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
From what I understand, you actually don't want an uphill horse for jumping.
You mean you don't want a downhill horse for jumping, right? A downhill horse is going to have a harder time getting its front end off the ground because it has a longer way to go and its back isn't level, so it takes more muscle to pull that front end up. An uphill horse (withers higher than butt) is ideal because their back is slanted up, making it easier and requiring less work for them to get their front end off the ground. :)

OP- At five, he should be fine to start teaching to jump. His bones have mostly fused (which is why he's pretty much quit growing), so you won't be doing any premature damage to them.
     
    05-23-2012, 08:56 PM
  #5
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum    
You mean you don't want a downhill horse for jumping, right? A downhill horse is going to have a harder time getting its front end off the ground because it has a longer way to go and its back isn't level, so it takes more muscle to pull that front end up. An uphill horse (withers higher than butt) is ideal because their back is slanted up, making it easier and requiring less work for them to get their front end off the ground. :)

OP- At five, he should be fine to start teaching to jump. His bones have mostly fused (which is why he's pretty much quit growing), so you won't be doing any premature damage to them.
For some reason I was thinking you want a slightly downhill horse for jumping, and an uphill built horse for dressage.
     
    05-23-2012, 08:59 PM
  #6
Trained
Uphill is good for any of the English disciplines. Downhill generally isn't (for the reasons I stated). Downhill is considered good for speed events, like barrels, or working cattle, though, where a horse needs to get down and turn quickly, which it can do well with the front end being closer to the ground. :)
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    05-23-2012, 09:54 PM
  #7
Started
He could still grow. My gelding filled out a LOT and grew a few centimeters between his fifth and sixth years.
     
    05-25-2012, 10:46 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Britt    
He could still grow. My gelding filled out a LOT and grew a few centimeters between his fifth and sixth years.
Oh okay :). Yeah that's what my instructor said to me. She said one of her horses grew until like seven

I really hope he will grow and even out
     
    05-25-2012, 09:41 PM
  #9
Trained
Being uphill is actually just as important for jumping as it is for dressage, for the exact same reasons. You want a horse that will find it easier to bring his hind end under himself to launch well over a jump. A downhill horse will find this more difficult than an uphill horse. Having said that though, a downhill horse can still jump well, they are just usually using more energy to do it, and will probably max out a fair bit lower than an uphill horse, but this might be a lot higher than the average rider will ever jump.
     
    05-25-2012, 11:24 PM
  #10
Yearling
At the point he is now I'd say he'd never be uphill, but if he is one of those that grows until age 7 like my boy, he could be closer to being even. My gelding is butt-high but still is decent looking in his conformation. But let me tell you, he can't jump to save his life. Some horses take more naturally to it, but I'm sure conformation has a lot to do with it. But I don't have any particular interest in jumping so for me it isn't much of a loss. Your horse could jump as long as he is sound, but the chances of you making the big leagues isn't in your favor.
     

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