High Bum?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Conformation Critique

High Bum?

This is a discussion on High Bum? within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Problem with bum high horses
  • My horse is 5 and still very bum high

Like Tree1Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-23-2012, 12:25 PM
  #1
Foal
Question High Bum?

This is my 5yr old Quarter Horse and



His bum is higher than his withers. I'm pretty sure he is still growing because he just turned 5 but isn't kinda late for him to still be growing? Will his withers eventually be higher? I really want to jump him but I don't think I really should start teaching him because I don't want him to get arthritis... oh and also he has this clicking in his hock when ever he walks and people told me it might be because his bum is putting alotta pressure on his hock so that's making it click? Another person said she had a horse that had that clicking its whole life and never meant anything...what do you think it is?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-23-2012, 05:49 PM
  #2
Trained
At 5, he's more the likely done growing. He may fill out more, he may not.but he will probably always be butt high.

From what I understand, you actually don't want an uphill horse for jumping.

As for the clicking hocks, talk to your vet. I'd get a soundness exam before starting jumping. But 5 is plenty old to start a horse on ground poles and popping over X rails.
     
    05-23-2012, 08:23 PM
  #3
Green Broke
He could still grow at age 5. Not alot but some. Depends on the horse.
I agree popping/clicking noise in hocks should be checked by a Vet
     
    05-23-2012, 09:53 PM
  #4
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
From what I understand, you actually don't want an uphill horse for jumping.
You mean you don't want a downhill horse for jumping, right? A downhill horse is going to have a harder time getting its front end off the ground because it has a longer way to go and its back isn't level, so it takes more muscle to pull that front end up. An uphill horse (withers higher than butt) is ideal because their back is slanted up, making it easier and requiring less work for them to get their front end off the ground. :)

OP- At five, he should be fine to start teaching to jump. His bones have mostly fused (which is why he's pretty much quit growing), so you won't be doing any premature damage to them.
     
    05-23-2012, 09:56 PM
  #5
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum    
You mean you don't want a downhill horse for jumping, right? A downhill horse is going to have a harder time getting its front end off the ground because it has a longer way to go and its back isn't level, so it takes more muscle to pull that front end up. An uphill horse (withers higher than butt) is ideal because their back is slanted up, making it easier and requiring less work for them to get their front end off the ground. :)

OP- At five, he should be fine to start teaching to jump. His bones have mostly fused (which is why he's pretty much quit growing), so you won't be doing any premature damage to them.
For some reason I was thinking you want a slightly downhill horse for jumping, and an uphill built horse for dressage.
     
    05-23-2012, 09:59 PM
  #6
Showing
Uphill is good for any of the English disciplines. Downhill generally isn't (for the reasons I stated). Downhill is considered good for speed events, like barrels, or working cattle, though, where a horse needs to get down and turn quickly, which it can do well with the front end being closer to the ground. :)
CLaPorte432 likes this.
     
    05-23-2012, 10:54 PM
  #7
Started
He could still grow. My gelding filled out a LOT and grew a few centimeters between his fifth and sixth years.
     
    05-25-2012, 11:46 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Britt    
He could still grow. My gelding filled out a LOT and grew a few centimeters between his fifth and sixth years.
Oh okay :). Yeah that's what my instructor said to me. She said one of her horses grew until like seven

I really hope he will grow and even out
     
    05-25-2012, 10:41 PM
  #9
Trained
Being uphill is actually just as important for jumping as it is for dressage, for the exact same reasons. You want a horse that will find it easier to bring his hind end under himself to launch well over a jump. A downhill horse will find this more difficult than an uphill horse. Having said that though, a downhill horse can still jump well, they are just usually using more energy to do it, and will probably max out a fair bit lower than an uphill horse, but this might be a lot higher than the average rider will ever jump.
     
    05-26-2012, 12:24 AM
  #10
Yearling
At the point he is now I'd say he'd never be uphill, but if he is one of those that grows until age 7 like my boy, he could be closer to being even. My gelding is butt-high but still is decent looking in his conformation. But let me tell you, he can't jump to save his life. Some horses take more naturally to it, but I'm sure conformation has a lot to do with it. But I don't have any particular interest in jumping so for me it isn't much of a loss. Your horse could jump as long as he is sound, but the chances of you making the big leagues isn't in your favor.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How High Can She Go? HorseLoverHunter English Riding 0 02-07-2012 09:47 PM
How High is too high?? please read! brodieluver26 Jumping 21 12-18-2010 03:20 PM
How High is too High? LoveTheSaddlebreds Horse Health 12 12-15-2009 02:44 PM
How High Can You Go? ChingazMyBoy Jumping 164 11-09-2009 08:50 PM
How high does this look to you? Dartanion Jumping 15 04-27-2009 10:28 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0