Horse hind end conformation problem - Page 3
 
 

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Horse hind end conformation problem

This is a discussion on Horse hind end conformation problem within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • My quarter horse doesnt cross her back legs on turning
  • Horse is lazy on hind end

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    05-17-2012, 12:47 AM
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Have you had someone come take a look at her?

She seems so... stiff and stuck in her entire hind up all the way up.
Not yet Skyseternalangel....Vets out here have to come from an hour and a half away.....and I already had one look at her twice. It is not something urgent...but the next time someone from our club has a vet out for something, I will have her looked at again. I will keep you posted. :)
     
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    05-17-2012, 11:06 AM
  #22
Started
I wish you were closer as i'd give you my vet's name. I think he's fabulous. :(
     
    05-17-2012, 11:16 AM
  #23
Showing
From what I can see she is narrow. I'm not seeing any soreness. Your farrier should be able to reduce the narrowness, to reduce her chances of striking the other hind leg.
     
    05-17-2012, 09:12 PM
  #24
Banned
I'd bet a mortgage payment it's the stifles, looks to be both of them.
flytobecat likes this.
     
    05-18-2012, 12:25 AM
  #25
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
From what I can see she is narrow. I'm not seeing any soreness. Your farrier should be able to reduce the narrowness, to reduce her chances of striking the other hind leg.
Thanks Saddlebag...I will mention it to my farrier next Friday.
     
    05-18-2012, 12:26 AM
  #26
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexS    
I'd bet a mortgage payment it's the stifles, looks to be both of them.
Are you thinking around the lines of locking stiflles?...or something else? It is not consistent and she seems to have improved from a few months ago since being worked. I don't ever hear any clicking.
     
    05-18-2012, 10:50 AM
  #27
Started
Hmmm , the first thing that came to mind when watching her is if she was a dog I would suspect Hip Dysplasia.............. Bunny hopping, not extending in the rear, keeping weight on the front end. Perfect description of HD... in a dog.
Wonder if horses can have the same type of issues: femoral head not fitting in the socket of the hip joint, sublexation of the femoral head, shallow hip socket?
     
    05-18-2012, 10:58 PM
  #28
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by wyominggrandma    
Hmmm , the first thing that came to mind when watching her is if she was a dog I would suspect Hip Dysplasia.............. Bunny hopping, not extending in the rear, keeping weight on the front end. Perfect description of HD... in a dog.
Wonder if horses can have the same type of issues: femoral head not fitting in the socket of the hip joint, sublexation of the femoral head, shallow hip socket?
That is funny because I actually thought of that same scenario! Like I said, I will continue to work her the same way I have been and review her progress again end of summer. I think it has improved since I got her and started working her. She used to clip her front heels really bad and make them bleed at the beginning of this and she had those noodle leg moments more frequently then. She no longer clips her front heels ever and isn't having quite as many noodle moments. Thanks for the input though!
     
    05-21-2012, 02:15 AM
  #29
Foal
Hi, I just found this post and had to reply...have you found out anything else? I have a 16 year old Missouri Fox Trotter (who looks very similar to yours I almost fell out of my seat lol) who also has been having some hind quarter issues for a few years as I understand it. We only just bought her about 3 weeks ago. We've had a chiropractor come out who gave her an adjustment and that seemed to help for a bit. She has good days where you don't see it at all and then days where she looks so stiff. Very similar to some of your shots. We're still at a loss as to what it truly is to "fix" it, but have noticed that she often "works it out". Still would love to know what the cause is.

Thanks!
     
    05-21-2012, 08:14 AM
  #30
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoldOnGaited    
Hi, I just found this post and had to reply...have you found out anything else? I have a 16 year old Missouri Fox Trotter (who looks very similar to yours I almost fell out of my seat lol) who also has been having some hind quarter issues for a few years as I understand it. We only just bought her about 3 weeks ago. We've had a chiropractor come out who gave her an adjustment and that seemed to help for a bit. She has good days where you don't see it at all and then days where she looks so stiff. Very similar to some of your shots. We're still at a loss as to what it truly is to "fix" it, but have noticed that she often "works it out". Still would love to know what the cause is.

Thanks!
Thanks SoldOnGaited! Very interesting. We will have to compare notes through this journey. I am at a loss really. But in the same sense...it doesn't seem detrimental. She was cantering and galloping full speed in our arena the other day with another horse and she was powerful and just fine. No 'noodle legs'. Yesterday she was just meandering around at a trot/canter and I saw it a bit.....not bad though. She just seemed to be in 'lazy' mode. Her hind end to me seems very flexible. Her personality is also quite goofy and der der der......so maybe it is just her always being loose because she is soooooo relaxed. You can do anything with her....even cross her front and hind legs like she is on a balance beam and she will hold them there.....that was why I first expected 'wobblers' or something. But she passes all of the other tests. It doesn't seem that she doesn't know where her legs are, but more like she is just saying 'Ok, I will go along with this game and do what you want'. I'm riding her on short rides...she just turned three.....and I am 180lbs....and she does just fine. She never resists or falls. She yields her hindquarters very nicely and doesn't hesitate. She is just a happy little horse. She is a spotted draft cross so the vet had originally said that she is still growing into her hind legs and learning how to use them. Nobody at my boarding facility can put their finger on what is going on either. I will definitely keep this thread updated.
     

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