How "long backed" is my horse?......(PIV HEAVY)
 
 

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How "long backed" is my horse?......(PIV HEAVY)

This is a discussion on How "long backed" is my horse?......(PIV HEAVY) within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Long backed horse
  • Long backed horses

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    01-14-2012, 02:08 PM
  #1
Foal
Question How "long backed" is my horse?......(PIV HEAVY)

Hi, I've posted my horse before and was told he had a long back and a weak hip. How hard is it going to be for him to track up, or get under himself? He flexes well, and is starting to carry himself at the vertical...............
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    01-14-2012, 04:00 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
I don't think his back is all THAT long. Remember , it's from the back edge of his wither bone to the pelvis that measures the back, and since he has a nicely sloped shoulder, the wither is set further back than some horses.
This horse looks like he has some draft in him, or maybe mustang (who sometimes have draft in them). Is this true? His hind end is quite vertical with legs that are a bit posty and a somewhat steep and small hip. But I would not categorize it as weak. He has really nice bone all around, a lovely neck of good length and set on the shoulder correctly. Nice feet. I rather like the look of him. He may not be a good build for dressage, though. YOu can make the best of him or not, as per your skill and willingness to patiantly work on building his muscle correctly.
One thing about long backed horses; they are often very comfortable for the rider! I mean are a smooth ride.
     
    01-14-2012, 04:06 PM
  #3
Yearling
His back is not long. It just looks long because of his rump being small. He has nice bone and feet I like a lot. I would work on backing him to build some muscle in his rump. Gorgeous horse he looks like a big boy.
     
    01-14-2012, 04:38 PM
  #4
Showing
If I remember correctly, this is the horse that has a lot of Hancock in his lines, correct? That would account for his appearance. Hancock horses are fairly well known as having larger heads and coarse features, which would explain the "mustang" look.

Yes, his back is longer than ideal and yes, his hip is small, but I believe the horse is still rather young (2-3) so he will bulk up in his hip as he grows a bit older. However, his stifle angle is a little bit too straight. He probably will have trouble really rounding up and tracking up, but getting him to work at it will help to strengthen his weak points and make him an all-around stronger horse.
     
    01-14-2012, 08:44 PM
  #5
Foal
What you think is conformation is actually posture!!

I quickly had a look at your horse for you...

What may surprise you and others reading my post is many conformational issues like sickle hocked, long backed, croup high, over the shoulder etc. are actually not "conformational issues due to breeding at all BUT postural and can change!!

He is just a horse that is out of muscular /skeletal balance and it gives him the appearance of being long backed due to how is standing.

See we have only had horses that were out of balance through history to reference to - they were out of balance due to the fact they were used in wars and work and had many accidents and injuries! So due there injuries they would stand to make themselves comfortable... legs out behind, front legs underneath etc!!!

A few things to help you and your horse...If you massage his hind end or gluteals muscles this will help to break up the pattern! Also, if you push on your horse's ribs the most like feel tight- when we push on our horses ribs the should give to the contact as designed.....

Good luck and let me know if you have any questions!
     
    01-14-2012, 08:57 PM
  #6
Showing
Um, no^^. Conformational issues are called such because they stem from the horse's basic conformation, their skeletal structure. No amount of massage or whatever is going to make a horse's front legs grow another inch or two or their back suddenly lose a vertebrae to make it shorter, nor will it correct an upright shoulder(which is what I'm assuming you meant by "over the shoulder"). Those are skeletal structure issues and are simply there.
     
    01-14-2012, 09:12 PM
  #7
Foal
Dear Smrobs

I'm sorry to say what you are saying is incorrect and you have come to believe that due to what you have been taught. As, one of the leading experts in the equestrian field for rehab therapy- -for many what I am saying is hard to believe however, I have cases worldwide to prove the fact the long back can change and is not due to breeding..

And again is only how the horse has come to compensate for being out of balance which is giving it the appearance of being long backed! You may want to research the other options out there about equine conformation!
     
    01-14-2012, 09:13 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecsworkshops    
Dear Smrobs

I'm sorry to say what you are saying is incorrect and you have come to believe that due to what you have been taught. As, one of the leading experts in the equestrian field for rehab therapy- -for many what I am saying is hard to believe however, I have cases worldwide to prove the fact the long back can change and is not due to breeding..

And again is only how the horse has come to compensate for being out of balance which is giving it the appearance of being long backed! You may want to research the other options out there about equine conformation!
How about providing your "evidence" rather than just claiming to have it?
     
    01-14-2012, 09:19 PM
  #9
Foal
If you feel that will help you, I would be glad to!!
     
    01-14-2012, 09:20 PM
  #10
Showing
I would also be interested in seeing such "evidence" that a long back on a horse can be fixed by massaging his butt.
kitten_Val likes this.
     

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