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  • Can a old splint injury flare up in horses

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    07-08-2012, 04:03 PM
  #11
Weanling
14 is not old at all. Nice and seasoned, but lots of life and work left. Horses live to be 25-30, and some work into their 20's. One of the main factors in a horse in it's teens+ is current bone/tendon/tooth condition. If you are really concerned but really like him, I would get an ultrasound/X-ray to help determine what the current state of his body is in, how susceptible to injury he is, any previous injuries that might flare up and make him lame ect.

With a horse 12+, it varies by individual horse. Some horses can do pretty strenuous work until they're 16 or maybe 18, but some have to stop at 15, for old injury ect. There is a user on this forum who had a grey-faced 30+ appaloosa gelding that was still doing regular exercise.
     
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    07-08-2012, 05:28 PM
  #12
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexanFreedom    
14 is not old at all. Nice and seasoned, but lots of life and work left. Horses live to be 25-30, and some work into their 20's. One of the main factors in a horse in it's teens+ is current bone/tendon/tooth condition. If you are really concerned but really like him, I would get an ultrasound/X-ray to help determine what the current state of his body is in, how susceptible to injury he is, any previous injuries that might flare up and make him lame ect.

With a horse 12+, it varies by individual horse. Some horses can do pretty strenuous work until they're 16 or maybe 18, but some have to stop at 15, for old injury ect. There is a user on this forum who had a grey-faced 30+ appaloosa gelding that was still doing regular exercise.
I don't disagree with the fact that horses can be worked well into their senior years infact many do. But she wanted to do hunter/jumper 3'+ competitively and I don't think a senior mount is appropriate for this type of work load. It isn't fair for the horse unless you find that you are willing to accept the fact that the horse may be unable to do what you purchased/traded it to do in the next 4-5 years best case scenario. If your goal is to move up levels with a horse which is why you're trading/selling the horse you have now you ought to have a horse you're going to be able to move up levels with... Maybe it's just my opinion...
     
    07-08-2012, 06:03 PM
  #13
Foal
Regular exercise isn't the same as higher level competition.

Thank you for your input! I was just curious about others' opinions.
     
    07-08-2012, 06:07 PM
  #14
Started
My daughter still has two ancient Arabian rescues. Both geldings. Both about 30 years old now. One has arthritis badly and can do no work. Just kept comfortable on medication. The second is very full of himself, in super condition and can still climb mountains and go all day. Not happy to come home and would gladly go again if allowed. He has barely a tooth in his mouth and is on soft food.

Interestingly, we know their previous homes. The first - who is absolutely gorgeous, has had a very good home and the best of care, his entire life. Only one owner, who has now passed away. Sadly, at the end of the summer, my daughter will put him to sleep. She doesn't want him to go through yet another winter, of not feeling well.

The second, has been chucked around through many homes and almost starved at the previous one. He's not particularly good looking but still at his advanced age, and even being almost toothless, probably has several good years left in him.

It is difficult to tell with horses. Sometimes those well bred and with the best of care, can break down early, while others who have been through the wringer, seem to go on for ever.

Years ago, when I was young, we'd think 14-18 was an old horse. These days, a horse of maybe 25, is considered old. A great deal has to do with genetics. Always nice to know the parents and grandparents. How long did they live? What did they die of? Everything one knows of a horse can help and that includes a good comprehensive ppe by a qualified vet.

As with all living things, one cannot always know how soon or from what, a horse might break down or die. With the best of care, it is not always in our hands.

Lizzie
     
    07-08-2012, 06:08 PM
  #15
Foal
*BTW*
Woops sorry. I'm on my friend's account at her house xD I'm the OP
     
    07-08-2012, 09:28 PM
  #16
Yearling
I think 14 might be a little bit too old, but it all depends on the horse. Honestly, I liked the horse that was "a little too fast" a lot! That jumping pic was amazing. I know of a horse that is currently 37 yrs old and was retired just two years ago!
     
    07-08-2012, 10:44 PM
  #17
Foal
**STILL OP ON FRIEND'S ACCOUNT**
I liked her too.. I think I may lean towards selling my pony first so I can have the freedom of picking what I REALLY want, instead of trading.
     
    07-08-2012, 11:41 PM
  #18
Weanling
I agree, that for moving up in competition, that horse is not a very good choice. He would only last up to maybe 5 years before he would have to be light work only, if not before that. I guess I failed to mention that. I meant to, but I guess I forgot.

IMO, the mare Almond Joy mentioned (I don't remember, but she really stood out in my mind) is the ideal choice for moving up. She is my personal favorite. Lots of confidence (I presume).

By the way, 14 is not senior. 12 is definitely not a senior, 15 isn't either, but 18 can be showing some signs

When I said 'regular exercise', I didn't mean that you should go out and buy a [still able to work] geriatric horse. Obviously, he can't be put into hard physical work, like jumping, which is hard on the joints, at any age. I was just giving an example of how old horses can still work [lightly], and horses vary by individual, I think FeatheredFeet gave a better example of this, tough :/
     
    07-09-2012, 02:08 AM
  #19
Foal
I really wouldn't be so worried about a 14 year old. If anything, you'd at least be getting what you see. I bought a 14 year old Appy gelding that was incredible at jumping. And honestly, he was really sound. I had a flex test done on him and he passed with flying colors. I would certainly look at him. Do not rule him out just because he is 14. They can be the best horses. If it looks like he's not going to hold, then just make the decision to not buy him. But I think for moving up, he would be a good bet. He would get you there NOW or at least much sooner than a green horse would. Not to say that green horses are bad (that is route I've taken with my past two horses). I guess it'll just get into a bigger shows sooner than trying to train up a young horse. Plus, if he is trained well, he'll really show you the ropes rather than you having to show him the ropes all the time. Know what I mean?

I also agree that the mare that is too quick would be worth looking at. Sometimes it's a people error more than a horse error :)
     
    07-09-2012, 04:41 PM
  #20
Foal
I like the first one and the last one. The rest don't look like they would hold up to jumping for long. If you watch the first horses gait, he steps right into the spot he stepped out of, that is a well built horse. The 14 year old is fat and uncoonditioned as you said, and maybe it is just from the photo however I would check him closely for splints. The 5 year old 15.2 horse is slightly over at the knees and her legs don't look strong enough to support her body weight especially jumping for years. Good luck and God bless. Peg
     

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