Please Critique my 3 yr old gelding
 
 

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Please Critique my 3 yr old gelding

This is a discussion on Please Critique my 3 yr old gelding within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • 3 yr old front toes out horse conformation

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  • 1 Post By tinyliny
  • 1 Post By karawenger

 
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    11-15-2013, 12:02 PM
  #1
Foal
Please Critique my 3 yr old gelding

This is my 3 year old gelding, these are his sale pictures. He will be 4 in May. He is an American Paint Horse. Please let me know what you think of his conformation, as I am not terribly confident in critiquing conformation myself. However, I already know that he is underweight, so please don't comment on that.
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    11-15-2013, 12:09 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I'm not a conformation expert either, but overall he's not completely horrible.

His back is too long for the rest of his body, and looks like he may have a slight roached back (hard to tell in the photos).

Neck is awful thin-looking, but he is also quite underweight.

Bit of a Roman nose on his head.

Front pasterns look a bit steep and long to me. Very slightly cow-hocked in the hind legs.

Mostly, he needs groceries and muscle tone. Do you know why he is so underweight?
Have you had his teeth done?
Have you had a vet examine him?
Is he getting enough to eat?
     
    11-15-2013, 01:24 PM
  #3
Foal
I think he will look better with weight and conditioning. I do think his back is long and his front pasterns are a bit upright. If you're looking for low level competition, trails and pleasure, he could be fine.

Poor guy looks apathetic in those pictures - like a much older horse. He will hopefully brighten up with good food and love.
     
    11-15-2013, 01:52 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
The angle of photograph is a bit upward, so can distort the view of the back.

He has good angles, good bone , short canons, good hock size and angle, same with pasterns. Cannot see hooves. Neck is set on a bit low and is undermuscled. Shoulder is steep. A fundamentally nicely built horse.
Elana likes this.
     
    11-15-2013, 02:57 PM
  #5
Weanling
Overall, I actually quite like this horse.
He's pretty ewe necked.
Instead of seeing a long back, I see a proportionally short neck.
His shoulder is steep and he appears to be slightly sickled through the hind legs. I do like how low set his hocks are though. Is that a scar from an old injury on his left hind cannon bone?
I don't actually think he looks that thin... If his had a thick, well muscled neck and topline then I wouldn't worry about seeing those ribs at all.
I'm also wondering if his back looks slightly roached because he has ulcers or possibly some other discomfort? Something that might also hinder weight gain?
Cute horse overall though. What are your plans for him?
     
    11-17-2013, 12:13 AM
  #6
Foal
He does look pretty apathetic, doesn't he? The picture of his right side looks especially bad because he was annoyed with a bug! =) He's just VERY laid back and lazy... He has his moments, but mostly he's just a lug =) He's very sweet!
@laurapratt01 yes, that is a scar on his hind leg, the guy I bought him from just left him alone in the pasture all his life, so didn't know what happened. It healed pretty ugly, but no issues with it.
So far just planning to trail ride him, and he's great, I think he'll turn into a real bombproof boy that anyone can be safe on.
laurapratt01 likes this.
     
    11-17-2013, 05:10 AM
  #7
Trained
This horse is not cow hocked. His hind legs are correct. A horse should toe out very slightly in the hind leg and it is not a bad thing if it toes in a little bit in the front leg. A LITTLE bit. Not a lot.

He's quite a nice horse actually, other than that upright shoulder and how his neck is set on. His hip is a little bit short [for a stock breed] and his croup a bit steep, and he is a touch functionally downhill but that is normal for stock breeds. I have yet to see an uphill Paint. Level is the best I've seen. He might be a touch tied in below the knee and I think once he's up to weight he'll be a bit light on bone. Unattractive head with a smallish eye and have fun saddle fitting to that wither - my filly's is almost identical and I've had a real time of it! It's not high so much as long and sloping and I've really struggled to find something to fit that shape.

But all of that is nitpicking. This is a solid, functional, useful horse. I really like his depth of heartgirth and loingirth. He's the sort of horse that looks like he can go all day.
     
    11-19-2013, 11:58 PM
  #8
Foal
@blue eyed pony: you said it about his withers.... it's been a nightmare! But you are right about one thing, he CAN go all day! It's hard to wind him! Do you mind explaining tied in below the knee? I don't know that I know what that means.... =)
     
    11-20-2013, 05:03 AM
  #9
Trained
It basically means he measures bigger around the cannon just above the fetlock than he does just below the knee. This can restrict tendon function a little bit meaning he will need to be conditioned carefully for any high-impact sport but because the rest of the leg is largely correct I don't see any reason why he couldn't participate in a high-impact sport if he enjoys it [these are sports like jumping, barrel racing, cutting, gaming etc - and surprisingly dressage has been proven to be harder on the legs and tendons than anything else!].

Is he a Western or an English horse? He's built more for Western but I know lots of horses that do English that aren't built for it soooo... I can give you a few ideas for saddle fit if you ride him English. I've only found a few things that work for my filly [same age too, coincidentally!], nearly everything sits down on her wither.
     

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