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Please Critique my stallion.

This is a discussion on Please Critique my stallion. within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        11-05-2012, 04:34 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    BUmpety bumpety bump
         
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        11-06-2012, 03:58 PM
      #12
    Started
    I think he's very typical of his breed as it used to look. I had a peek at his pedigree and he's very tightly bred on a few horses and looks just like them, which would be expected. Handsome lad, when he's all groomed and not sporting a winter coat. What happened to his tail?

    May I suggest something please? Ask someone to go over your entire website and clean up the sentence structure, spelling and punctuation. I also couldn't get the pics to load.

    Lizzie
    themacpack likes this.
         
        11-07-2012, 04:10 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    I am redoing it just need to get around to it, a very slow boring task.

    The last photo was taken about two weaks before we got him and the show photo was the summer before we got him, he was put in with a gelding whilst his breeder/old owner moved ponies around and it chewed off his tail, it has grown back well now.

    Actually for a pony with the amount of Wells breeding he has he is surprisingly uninbred and the man no running the Wells stud doesn't seem to find anything wrong with breeding very inbred ponies which makes it a next to impossible task of finding a nice mare with Wells blood to put to him. And I agree I think he looks most like Wells Final Command.

    And thank I think he is very handsome too but was wondering what other people thought, as I have been told alot of nice things by people but it is hard to tell if they are just being nice. One person even went as far to say he was the best Shetland she had ever seen a photo of.
         
        11-07-2012, 04:16 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    He is stunning, I think this is what Shetlands should look like! Tough little ponies they are... I always say they have "little man syndrome"
         
        11-07-2012, 04:35 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Thank you. He doesn't have Little man syndrome so much but Star my 31" stallion now the amount of character he has for a little pony boyo boy.
         
        11-07-2012, 05:01 PM
      #16
    Started
    I didn't mean to imply that I am against inbreeding. As a matter of fact, I'm all for it - IF the breeder knows what they are doing and are setting type and using near perfect horses.

    Few animals are truly 'inbred', unless someone is breeding back to the same horse, generation after generation. And even then, there are others in the pedigree to consider.

    Lizzie
         
        11-07-2012, 05:43 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    When I say inbreeding I mean very inbred. For me Ricky was pushing it, but to actively choose to inbreed when there is lots of other ponies to choose from, from just as good of lines is bad for the bred, it reduces the health of the pony, apernetly this stud breeds badly tempered ponies with health and fertility problems, probably due to the amount of inbreeding, the more inbred the more chance of genetic disorders.

    Some examples.
    Wells Vitesse Shetland Pony Not too bad but not what I would do.

    This one is a terrible example, I don't see why you would want to inbreed so much, the dam is inbreed already, as it is a cross between the foals sire and his dam then she is crossed with her sire. They are not short on quality ponies to breed so it makes no sense to me.
    Wells Payton Shetland Pony

    Wells Wayward Lad Shetland Pony

    These are but a few examples of the huge amount of inbreed foals they breed, not all as bad as the last two mostly like the first.
         
        11-07-2012, 06:24 PM
      #18
    Started
    The thing is, you have to understand fully, about inbreeding. What it does, what it doesn't do and what it achieves.

    There is unfortunately, a whole of of myths and stories, about inbreeding. Most are not true. Inbreeding DOES NOT CAUSE problems!!! And that's a fact. Remember those three words. What it 'can' do, is show a breeder something which might have lain hidden in the line for years. If an offspring shows up with something undesirable, then he knows not to pursue that line of inbreeding further. If an almost perfect specimen shows up, then he can be fairly sure, that that colt will be prepotent for all his attributes.

    Inbreeding, can set 'type'. A type the breeder desires to have in his line. A type which is going to be probably, very prepotent.

    Wayward Lad, is an offspring of a mare bred back to her sire. Very common to breed this type of breeding in many breeds, if the breeder wanted to produce something like Extra Special or Vijay.

    Payton could be be expected to look a lot like Petrena and have her good points and also faults.

    Vitesse is a very common type linebreeding. This is what most breeders do. It won't necessarily produce something prepotent for type though.

    In outcrossing, one really never knows what to expect. The offspring can look like one of the parents or neither.

    Breeding is all about knowing as much as possible, about every horse in the first three generations. Every horse. After that, not a whole lot matters, but the more one knows, the better.

    Whether inbreeding, linebreeding or outcrossing, the breeder should have knowledge about the horses they are breeding and those in the pedigree.

    Lizzie
         
        11-07-2012, 06:53 PM
      #19
    Yearling
    Actually inbreeding can cause problems, ressesive genetic disorders that lay hidden in the ponies lines will be much more common, with outcrossing you can add a line that may be more immune to a certain diesese or not carry one, alot of people have told me that quite a few Wells bred ponies, ones bred by the stud not just having their lines, have had alot of health problems and some are found dead in the field with no appernt illness before hand. IMHO the quality of the Wells pony whilest still fantastic so times in more hit and miss then a couple of generations back and of a slightly lower quality.

    I would never inbreed like that, but to each his own.
         
        11-07-2012, 11:24 PM
      #20
    Started
    Actually inbreeding can cause problems,

    As I said before, it doesn't 'cause' them. They were there all the time. What it does do and only sometimes, is bring things to the fore, so the breeder knows what might or might not, be lurking in his herd.

    If one uses superior animals, without hidden genetic problems, then inbreeding will only express more superior animals.

    One thing which has been proven and only using rats for 10 straight generations, is that the last generation is usually smaller.

    As I previously mentioned, inbreeding should only at attempted by very knowledgeable breeders. We unfortunately see too often, irresponsibly inbred animals. Sometimes it's colts over 6 months old, left with their dams or full brothers and sisters, housed together. Incidentally, I have never found any reason to breed full brothers and sisters, regardless of quality. I don't feel it achieves anything.

    Lizzie
         

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