Possible candidate for daughter--are his back legs okay? - Page 2
 
 

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Possible candidate for daughter--are his back legs okay?

This is a discussion on Possible candidate for daughter--are his back legs okay? within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        11-27-2011, 02:10 PM
      #11
    Banned
    I don't think I've ever seen a horse with hind legs that long.
    That's what's making him adopt such a sickled posture. He looks more like a gaited horse than a stock horse.

    Now, this isn't the world's worst conformation flaw, but for that price, and with this horse's other issues, I'd sure pass and consider the much greater bang for my buck I could get elsewhere.
         
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        11-27-2011, 02:39 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    He's out. Trainer has something else up her sleeve.
         
        11-27-2011, 05:54 PM
      #13
    Cat
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fowl Play    
    He's out. Trainer has something else up her sleeve.
    You want to share the news? Now I'm curious!
         
        11-27-2011, 06:06 PM
      #14
    Trained
    Please find your daughter a nice safe older mount. 10 years old is in the prime of a horses life. A ten year old horse is old enough to be seasoned and safe yet still be around for at least 10 more years and probably 15 or 20. If I were looking for a horse for my kids I would look at a horse younger than eight and there would be no upper limit. If the horse is sound and suitable then I would consider a much older horse.

    Your trainer has bills to pay and likes long term customers. There is nothing wrong with that but realize that you are the one spending the money here. You would be much better off buying a horse your daughter can ride now and letting HER take lessons for a year before competing on it than to get a young horse and risk souring her on horses after you have made a huge investment.
    franknbeans and bsms like this.
         
        11-27-2011, 06:26 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    Please find your daughter a nice safe older mount. 10 years old is in the prime of a horses life. A ten year old horse is old enough to be seasoned and safe yet still be around for at least 10 more years and probably 15 or 20. If I were looking for a horse for my kids I would look at a horse younger than eight and there would be no upper limit. If the horse is sound and suitable then I would consider a much older horse.

    Your trainer has bills to pay and likes long term customers. There is nothing wrong with that but realize that you are the one spending the money here. You would be much better off buying a horse your daughter can ride now and letting HER take lessons for a year before competing on it than to get a young horse and risk souring her on horses after you have made a huge investment.
    A safe horse is our number 1 priority. We are not in a place where I can keep a horse, and now that we have an upside down mortgage, I don't forsee us being in that place for quite some time. I need a horse that will last for quite some time because I anticipate paying board for this horse for quite some time. I don't want to be paying board on a horse that cannot be used for what we need it to be used for, but as this is my daughter's 1st horse, I also know that it will be a horse that we have until it dies, hence the younger age.

    Yes, my trainer does like the idea of long term clients, but she has made it very clear that we will keep using the horse my daughter is riding until we find the right one, and if we don't find him before next 4-H year, we have another one in the works. She could be talking us into any horse because it means 1-2 lessons/week for me, plus board, but she's in no hurry for us to get a horse just to have a horse. As for what she has up her sleeve, God only knows. She made a call on one today. Who knows. As I've said, I have faith in her finding a good match for my daughter.
         
        11-27-2011, 06:40 PM
      #16
    Trained
    FWIW, I've met horses in their 20s with LOTS of get up and go. About a month ago, I saw a rider with a pinto/arabian cross. She was struggling to hold her mare back - prancing around, light on her feet, dancing and ready to roll. It turned out the mare was 22...

    If looking for a horse for my daughter to ride for 10+ years, I wouldn't look at a horse under 6. 8 would be better. 10-12 years with good conformation would be fine. Just IMHO.

    BTW - the trainer who is working with my mare had a daughter who was fanatical about horses. Rode every day. From 8 to 14. Hasn't ridden more than a handful of times a year since.
    Wallaby likes this.
         
        11-27-2011, 06:43 PM
      #17
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fowl Play    
    A safe horse is our number 1 priority. We are not in a place where I can keep a horse, and now that we have an upside down mortgage, I don't forsee us being in that place for quite some time. I need a horse that will last for quite some time because I anticipate paying board for this horse for quite some time. I don't want to be paying board on a horse that cannot be used for what we need it to be used for, but as this is my daughter's 1st horse, I also know that it will be a horse that we have until it dies, hence the younger age.

    Yes, my trainer does like the idea of long term clients, but she has made it very clear that we will keep using the horse my daughter is riding until we find the right one, and if we don't find him before next 4-H year, we have another one in the works. She could be talking us into any horse because it means 1-2 lessons/week for me, plus board, but she's in no hurry for us to get a horse just to have a horse. As for what she has up her sleeve, God only knows. She made a call on one today. Who knows. As I've said, I have faith in her finding a good match for my daughter.

    This statement concerns me a bit. Most of us certainly do not intend that, and I am sure your trainer doesn't either, but nothing comes with a guarantee. You never know what will happen a week down the road, much less 10 yrs.
         
        11-27-2011, 06:51 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    Okay, I guess I haven't really had the opportunity to explain our situation fully. It started with a question about a horses legs. I am not going into this blindly, nor do I want the horse "my kid can grow up with". I want a horse my daughter can ride hard for the next 10 years+. She has been riding in lessons for just shy of 4 years now, we leased a horse for 4-H last year, and are again this year. Myself AND my husband have been taking riding lessons, doing clinics, attending seminars, etc to prepare ourselves for horse ownership. We clean stalls once a week or more and I help give lessons to a group of beginners. My husband works on any project our trainer's husband can come up with, including new fences, new obstacles in the trail course, a new arena fence, hay (we put up 1000 bales this year). My daughter also helps in beginner lessons and camp. Before we even considered buying a horse, we have fully emersed ourselves in this lifestyle.

    Unlike many families who go out and buy a cheap horse that is not meant or trained for their kid's needs, I am searching the help and guidance of a professional who knows my daughter and her skill well. As I've said, I trust her with my daughter's life. She chooses the 1000 lb animal to put my baby on. I do not consider myself prepared to go and look at a horse without her. It is her idea to put me on the horse for the year and leave my daughter on the lease for the remainder of the 4-H year. She believes that (with her help) I can bring the right horse along enough to put my daughter on next year WITH INSTRUCTION.

    Like anyone, I have a price range, and we are looking at horses within that price range, and within driving distance because we HAVE to see the horse. Ideally, we could do a 1 month trial so we could be in control of the horse for a vet check, but that's not always an option.

    As for my daughter, she's completely happy with the current situation, but knows that this will be her last year with this horse. He cannot keep up with her at the pace she likes to go. Right now she gets to ride the love of her life, and she knows we're looking for her next horse. What more could a kid want?

    Please understand that I am not going into this blindly. I have an excellent mentor who knows my budget and my kid. We are also doing what we can as her parents to prepare ourselves.
         
        11-27-2011, 07:09 PM
      #19
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    FWIW, I've met horses in their 20s with LOTS of get up and go. About a month ago, I saw a rider with a pinto/arabian cross. She was struggling to hold her mare back - prancing around, light on her feet, dancing and ready to roll. It turned out the mare was 22...

    If looking for a horse for my daughter to ride for 10+ years, I wouldn't look at a horse under 6. 8 would be better. 10-12 years with good conformation would be fine. Just IMHO.

    BTW - the trainer who is working with my mare had a daughter who was fanatical about horses. Rode every day. From 8 to 14. Hasn't ridden more than a handful of times a year since.

    I agree, don't completely count out an older horse. I got my first 2 horses when I was 12(13 years ago) they were sold to us as 15/16 but ended up being 20-25. The mare, Tiffany passed away when I was 18 but was sound and rideable up until the end, The gelding, Blue, I still have and if it wasn't for a recent injury he would still be rideable, he has tons of get up and go and will chase the horse half his age around the pasture and he's between 33-38 years old now. If a horse is well taken care of they can be sound and rideable until their 30's. Sure it is more of a gamble but there is nothing like a trusted older horse you can go for a good gallop on.
         
        11-27-2011, 07:10 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fowl Play    
    She also wears a size 8 boot right now. If her feet are an indication, she's got a lot of growing to do. She grew 5 inches last school year!
    hehe, I wonder how tall you are?

    I was 5'1 in the sixth grade and I wear an 8 1/2 shoe.

    I grew another couple inches in my Jr year of HS (LOL I don't think that's the usual thing for girls? XD), but finished off at not quite 5'3.

    My daughter on the other hand is predicted to be 5'10...I'm jealous!
         

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