Question... help with shoulder?
   

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Question... help with shoulder?

This is a discussion on Question... help with shoulder? within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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    • 1 Post By oconley
    • 1 Post By cowgirl4753

     
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        09-12-2012, 04:48 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Question... help with shoulder?

    OK...so this is my friends colt. She picked him up and I've had concerns about his shoulder ever since. She seems to think he's okay but I still wonder. He's a year old and was taken away from mom at 6 weeks (feedlot) so he was a rescue. He's on the small side and I'm guessing going to be stunted in growth because of the early weaning? What is everyone's opinion on the shoulder/conformation of this guy? Any ideas of his breed? I'd get more pics but then she'd know what I'm up to
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        09-12-2012, 05:17 PM
      #2
    Foal
    Yeah his shoulder is pretty pointy and it may always be, but I think the reason it looks so severe is his lack of muscle. I know he is only a baby, but he should still have some muscle/muscle tone. Does she have him in a large turn out where he can run around? Others to play with? Also, his belly looks a little to round and he appears a little ribby, is he on a good rotational worming program?

    He's cute. His back is a little long, but as long as she works him properly - when older - making sure that he carries himself from his belly up through his back and gets him to travel with a proper head carriage - no Giraffe neck, that will keep his back muscles toned and strong and will help to keep him from developing a drooping back/sway back.
         
        09-12-2012, 05:24 PM
      #3
    Foal
    I've looked at NUMEROUS yearling photos and haven't seen any pointy shoulders as severe as his. She's been ponying him around town at least 3x a week now and nothing has changed. In three months, the belly has gone down a bit- not much. He's housed with a 10yr old gelding and that's it. He's in a 12 x 24 stall mostly and then weekends he's turned out in the yard for the most part (I'd say the size of a good arena?) If he runs around too much though, he limps.
         
        09-12-2012, 05:50 PM
      #4
    Foal
    Well, there's nothing that is screaming deformed to me. You say your friend adopted/purchased this little guy from a feed lot, any idea on his dam's breed? His shoulder is just pointy.

    Personally if it were me, I'd have him in a bigger corral. At least 24 x 48 if possible. He's a cutie though!!
         
        09-12-2012, 06:32 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Wish I could find some pics of a mare we had. She was born at our place and had the largest pointest shoulders I've seen. She still has pointy shoulder blades but are less prominent when she's in shape. They never affected her physically and grew into a great horse.
    I agree that he looks a wee bit wormy. Did he get dewormed with just the regular stuff or the stuff with tapeworm in it too. I also agree he should be turned out to run and frolic more then you said he is getting. Being ponied is good but colts need to be able to jump around and run and play to develop their muscles and tendons properly.
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        09-12-2012, 06:47 PM
      #6
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cowgirl4753    
    Wish I could find some pics of a mare we had. She was born at our place and had the largest pointest shoulders I've seen. She still has pointy shoulder blades but are less prominent when she's in shape. They never affected her physically and grew into a great horse.
    I agree that he looks a wee bit wormy. Did he get dewormed with just the regular stuff or the stuff with tapeworm in it too. I also agree he should be turned out to run and frolic more then you said he is getting. Being ponied is good but colts need to be able to jump around and run and play to develop their muscles and tendons properly.
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    I'm guessing that is the reason behind him rearing up and striking at her pony horse's head while we are riding! UGH.

    So I'm guessing now that the shoulder is just looks.
         
        09-12-2012, 07:15 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    Ya LOL he's trying to play! He sure is cute
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        09-12-2012, 08:23 PM
      #8
    Foal
    What the others said! He needs some play time and if your friend's gelding isn't playing with him then he would probably benefit from a large ball to chase around. The reason he limps after playing for a while could be due to poor tendon strength due to inactivity or maybe in his excitement, he's hocking himself. Tell her to turn him out, let him play and worm him with something like Zimectrin Gold. He may always have the wonky shoulder but it'll be far less noticeable with more muscle :)
         
        09-13-2012, 09:22 AM
      #9
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by oconley    
    I've looked at NUMEROUS yearling photos and haven't seen any pointy shoulders as severe as his. She's been ponying him around town at least 3x a week now and nothing has changed. In three months, the belly has gone down a bit- not much. He's housed with a 10yr old gelding and that's it. He's in a 12 x 24 stall mostly and then weekends he's turned out in the yard for the most part (I'd say the size of a good arena?) If he runs around too much though, he limps.

    Is this being taken care of? I noticed many were posting for him to be out and playing but why is he limping?
         
        09-15-2012, 03:55 PM
      #10
    Super Moderator
    I would say that he needs worming just to be sure, turning out with another youngster on good grass and forgetting about for at least two years.

    Being shut in is stressful for a youngster. He will muscle up more if allowed the freedom to roam as a normal horse should.
         

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