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Quick confo. question

This is a discussion on Quick confo. question within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Roached back in horses
  • Roach back horse

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    12-15-2011, 08:35 AM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
Loosie it has to do with the amount of power that the horse can easily generate from behind. That tail is WAY too low and croup too steep for any real engagement which sadly will be necessary to decrease the impact of his downhill build and upright pasterns.

Although your theory about posture vs structure does make sense, my horses both develop a rather similar stance when they are extremely uncomfortable. I have only witnessed it a couple of times but they DO do it. HOWEVER, this then leads us to infer that the horse must be uncomfortable or in pain, and therefore probably not sound. In the case of my horses, it was in the middle of nature's fury - and my filly's first storm. My gelding came from warmer climates and so the cold often brings this stance. It is more often pain causing such a 'tucked' appearance, like the horse has tipped his hips underneath him to stretch out (or relax) sore muscles. I would hazard a guess that this horse is either sore in the back or hindquarter, or tends towards a low-grade colic.

The unsoundness is really connecting dots considering when I (and other people who saw his video) evaluated his movement for the interested buyer, his back right leg did not look right at all. He had a really nice flat front movement but as he was loping and jogging he looked seriously uncomfortable. I'll see if I can post the video!
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    12-15-2011, 09:09 AM
  #12
Trained
Yep if they LOOK uncomfortable and it's affecting their posture then it's often a pretty significant discomfort.

Nobody likes to hear that their (or their friend's) horse is unsound but in this case all the facts seem to be pointing in that direction especially with you saying he seems uncomfortable when he's moving. It MAY be something as simple as muscle pain or that he has a rib or a vertebra out of place, or it may be something sinister. Your friend may want to have him seen by a good equine specialist vet.
     
    12-15-2011, 10:06 AM
  #13
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
Yep if they LOOK uncomfortable and it's affecting their posture then it's often a pretty significant discomfort.

Nobody likes to hear that their (or their friend's) horse is unsound but in this case all the facts seem to be pointing in that direction especially with you saying he seems uncomfortable when he's moving. It MAY be something as simple as muscle pain or that he has a rib or a vertebra out of place, or it may be something sinister. Your friend may want to have him seen by a good equine specialist vet.
I think she's decided not to even bother getting a vet check since multiple people have said the same things about him. If he wasn't so funky in his rear end he'd be super cute!!
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    12-15-2011, 10:20 AM
  #14
Trained
A vet may be able to solve the problem. Or a good equine chiro. I consider it irresponsible for a horse not to get help when it's so clearly in pain. Even if it's just to find out that there's nothing that can be done, because sometimes knowing that is the most powerful thing of all. It allows us to decide whether to retire the horse, or to dose it up on painkillers so that it can continue living a productive life.

My mother, after owning her horse for a year, finally got a lameness exam done on him because he'd been sore on and off for a long time even before she took him on. Vet doesn't think anything can be done. But sometimes, things CAN be done. Sore muscles can be released and made comfortable, or arthritic joints can be injected. Hooves can be shod or improved.

I must ask you - IS he uncomfortable in the pasture or just under saddle? Because if he's unhappy even in the pasture, there's quality of life to consider. It's a bit selfish of your friend to not see a vet because "oh a few people have said that now". In fact I would be inclined to go the opposite, get a vet BECAUSE a few people said he looked off. That might be just me though?
     
    12-15-2011, 11:48 AM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
A vet may be able to solve the problem. Or a good equine chiro. I consider it irresponsible for a horse not to get help when it's so clearly in pain. Even if it's just to find out that there's nothing that can be done, because sometimes knowing that is the most powerful thing of all. It allows us to decide whether to retire the horse, or to dose it up on painkillers so that it can continue living a productive life.

My mother, after owning her horse for a year, finally got a lameness exam done on him because he'd been sore on and off for a long time even before she took him on. Vet doesn't think anything can be done. But sometimes, things CAN be done. Sore muscles can be released and made comfortable, or arthritic joints can be injected. Hooves can be shod or improved.

I must ask you - IS he uncomfortable in the pasture or just under saddle? Because if he's unhappy even in the pasture, there's quality of life to consider. It's a bit selfish of your friend to not see a vet because "oh a few people have said that now". In fact I would be inclined to go the opposite, get a vet BECAUSE a few people said he looked off. That might be just me though?
She was talking about a vet check that comes with buying a horse. She means if there's something clearly wrong, she's not going so spend the money she could be spending on a healthy and sound horse, on an unsound one. I think she's going to tell the owners about what has been said and recommend the horse be seen by a vet before anyone else tries to buy him.
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    12-15-2011, 05:12 PM
  #16
Trained
Thanx blue eye, yeah, tailset prob clear... When you explained it!
Don't get why you say although about my other comment tho, as you appear to then agree?
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    12-15-2011, 06:21 PM
  #17
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
It's a bit selfish of your friend to not see a vet because "oh a few people have said that now". In fact I would be inclined to go the opposite, get a vet BECAUSE a few people said he looked off. That might be just me though?
Blue eyes you missed the part that said op's friend was considering buying the horse, it's not hers.
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    12-15-2011, 11:47 PM
  #18
Yearling
Can someone explain to me what a roach back is, exactly, and what it causes? I see that something's wrong with his back, but I'm really curious as to the details...


Also, could you post a video or another picture so that I can see more clearly what's going on? I'd love it if you could, I'm trying to learn more about conformation. Thank you. :)
     
    12-15-2011, 11:57 PM
  #19
Banned
Roach back is abnormal convex curvature of the spine....sort of the opposite of a swayback.







It causes an odd stance in more severe cases, which leads to secondary soundness issues, and even in milder circumstances it can lead to back pain.
     
    12-16-2011, 12:28 AM
  #20
Yearling
I see. Thank you!
     

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