Tell me what you think
 
 

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Tell me what you think

This is a discussion on Tell me what you think within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

     
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        12-29-2012, 09:09 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    Tell me what you think

    I know it's not the best picture, but I'm only looking for a fairly general critique. He's my baby and I love this horse to death - I mainly want to know if there's anything that I need to pay attention to. For instance, I've been told I shouldn't jump him because of his front knees.

    I see.... slightly over at the knees, an angular rump, and a parrot mouth with a pretty decent overbite.

    What do you see and is there anything that would limit what he can do?

         
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        12-29-2012, 09:10 PM
      #2
    Yearling
    Oh, and he's a tad pidgeon-toed in the front. It's hard to see unless you're looking for it.
         
        12-29-2012, 09:26 PM
      #3
    Started
    What do you want him to do?
         
        12-29-2012, 09:32 PM
      #4
    Yearling
    He's my endurance horse, but since I'll have him for a long time, I'm not sure what else I may do with him.
         
        12-29-2012, 09:33 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    I'm also just curious to see what people say about his conformation.
         
        12-29-2012, 09:40 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    Shoulder is a bit upright but he has a nice neck and head set
    In my opinion he appears over at the knee, yes, but also quite buck-kneed
    Short cannons
    Back is not a bad length
    Short and steep slope to the croup
    Cannot accurately judge the back legs in that photo
         
        12-29-2012, 09:47 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Shoulder is a bit upright
    Funny about the shoulder - isn't upright supposed to make them have a choppier trot and not extend? Because his trot is HUGE and very free moving. I'll have to find a pictures.

    What's the difference between being over at the knee and buck-kneed?
         
        12-29-2012, 10:03 PM
      #8
    Yearling
    Here are a few pictures of him trotting and reaching out some, though neither are quite as big as he gets when we're conditioning. We can cruise along at 14-15mph in his extended trot.
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg IMG_0647.jpg (64.0 KB, 73 views)
    File Type: jpg Image.jpg (46.9 KB, 74 views)
         
        12-30-2012, 07:05 AM
      #9
    Green Broke
    This is a pretty nice horse. He has an open angle at the point of shoulder and his neck is not set low so even though the shoulder is a bit steep, the open angle helps to keep it from limiting he ability to move in front. He has a nice short back but his coupling is a bit long with the peak of croup set a bit far back. He has good bone and nice roomy hocks. He is a little bit over at the knee (same as buck knee'd). This is mostly a cosmetic issue and will not hurt him if he is jumping (tied at the knee and back at the knee horses want to avoid jumping).

    In the photos of you riding him and from his physical look, this horse travels a good bit with his head up and his back hollow. He will last a LOT longer if you can get him to loser his head and raise his back by way of strengthening his abdominal muscles.

    I also notice something else.. whoever is trimming his feet is leaving him a bit slipper footed.. long toes and low cut heels. This will put strain on his tendons in the front leg and is something you may want to address with your farrier.

    Nice horse. Really.
         
        12-30-2012, 11:14 AM
      #10
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Elana    
    this is a pretty nice horse. He has an open angle at the point of shoulder and his neck is not set low so even though the shoulder is a bit steep, the open angle helps to keep it from limiting he ability to move in front. He has a nice short back but his coupling is a bit long with the peak of croup set a bit far back. He has good bone and nice roomy hocks. He is a little bit over at the knee (same as buck knee'd). This is mostly a cosmetic issue and will not hurt him if he is jumping (tied at the knee and back at the knee horses want to avoid jumping).

    In the photos of you riding him and from his physical look, this horse travels a good bit with his head up and his back hollow. He will last a LOT longer if you can get him to loser his head and raise his back by way of strengthening his abdominal muscles.

    I also notice something else.. whoever is trimming his feet is leaving him a bit slipper footed.. long toes and low cut heels. This will put strain on his tendons in the front leg and is something you may want to address with your farrier.

    Nice horse. Really.
    That makes sense about the shoulder - thanks for explaining it so clearly.

    He got that butt from his mom. He used to be skinnier, so I thought it was just a matter of rounding out that rump, but after I talked to the breeder (who I purchased him from), I realized it just wasn't going to go away. Now that I look at conformation guides, I realize that's the peak of the croup like you're talking about. Do I need to worry about that? Since he does he does have a short back as you say, is is still strong even though the peace of the croup is so far back? Will it affect his movement or wear and tear?

    That good bone is great for endurance! That's one of the reasons I liked him for the sport.

    Roomy hocks? I have no idea what that means, but I like where that's going lol.

    That's great news about his knees being mostly cosmetic. I've just been told by multiple people not to jump him because of them, and though they are very respected in my eyes, I don't think they've ever jumped. How come those knees don't affect/won't be affected by jumping?

    We're working on that high head and hallowed back thing. He came up sore after our first 50-miler in July (he'd done 3 25-mile races before that), partially due to saddle fit but I think it also has to do some with the way I'm riding and the way he's moving. Sure I'm a pretty experienced and decent rider in general, but, after 50 miles, even the slightest thing will show up as an issue. We're in the middle of moving right now, but I'm planning on taking equitation classes when we get to our new home and barn. I've determined that I have no idea what I'm doing when it comes to correcting either of these on my own.

    He was overdue for a trim in these pictures by about a month, so that explains the long toes. I usually get him trimmed once per month (so he'd gone two months in the picture). My trimmer is very reputable and takes time to explain everything she's doing, and I trust she's doing the right thing. She's done wonders on both of my horses' feet in the last year :) I'm going to miss her when we move!

    Thank you so much for your comments and thorough explanation. Since I didn't really have an "expert" eye for confirmation when I bought him on my own, I've always wondered how flawed he really may be. In the end, I love this horse and he makes a fantastic endurance horse, so the confirmation doesn't really matter except for anything that I might need to watch or be careful about, especially as he ages and any wear and tear since he's used for such a demanding sport. The rest is just information for information's sake, but I like to have that information. You made my day be reassuring me I really do as nice of a horse as I thought he was!
         

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