What Exactly is "Back at the Knee?" - Page 2
 
 

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What Exactly is "Back at the Knee?"

This is a discussion on What Exactly is "Back at the Knee?" within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Back at knee conformation
  • Back at the knee ottb

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    12-13-2012, 01:29 AM
  #11
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glynnis    
Ok, so I tried moving the line a little forward on my "Pinto" mare; I'm going to be making fun of myself for that one for a while. I know I shouldn't need to draw a line, I'm just trying to understand the shape/angle I would be looking for so hopefully, someday, I can actually spot this without using MS Paint. I apologize for my rudimentary artwork here; I tried to get both sides of her in this time. I can see she looks like she could be a little back at the knee from the perspective that her knee falls behind the line, but the sample picture provided has the line intersecting with the fetlock which hers doesn't even come close. So maybe slightly back at the knee? I'm sorry if I seem completely stupid here, but I'm really just trying to gain some clarity and knowledge around this. Maybe one day, I'll be giving out the critiques instead of constantly asking questions. Also, like I mentioned above, I'll try to see if I have any better photos of her tomorrow or, failing that, see if I can take some better ones in a few days - although, it being winter with deep snow and indoor lighting not the best, I'm not sure how successful I'll be.

Attachment 121660

What I remember learning in school about leg confo is that the "Ideal" leg confo, that red line you have drawn, would have split the leg in half, even on both sides. Her being back at the knee, as minor, or as severe as it could be varies, obviously. For example, my horse is over at the knee, it just means that there is more leg on the one side of the line than there is the other, being back at the knee means that there is more leg, and knee to the back of the line than there is the front.

Does that make a little bit more sense? Probably not the way I explained it. Being back at the knee is less ideal that being over at the knee, from what I have been told, trainers prefer racehorses to be over at the knee, therefore, they have an easier time breaking over, or bending. Behind the knee is less preferred. Obviously the ideal leg, is just that, ideal, but to be honest, I havent seen many horses that do have the "perfect, Ideal Leg!" lol

Like I said, hope my rambling made a little bit of sense to you! Lol
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    12-13-2012, 02:04 AM
  #12
twp
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Casey02    
Her breed would not be pinto--that's a color
The poster never said her breed was a pinto.. She said she was a pinto.. Arab x tb x paint.. That = A pinto Horse.
     
    12-13-2012, 02:12 AM
  #13
twp
Banned
She is really cool looking. She has a bigger shoulder with arab legs, and neck.. She might be slightly back at the knee, but looks to me like she just has a longer pastern.
     
    12-13-2012, 10:51 AM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by csimkunas6    
What I remember learning in school about leg confo is that the "Ideal" leg confo, that red line you have drawn, would have split the leg in half, even on both sides. Her being back at the knee, as minor, or as severe as it could be varies, obviously. For example, my horse is over at the knee, it just means that there is more leg on the one side of the line than there is the other, being back at the knee means that there is more leg, and knee to the back of the line than there is the front.

Does that make a little bit more sense? Probably not the way I explained it. Being back at the knee is less ideal that being over at the knee, from what I have been told, trainers prefer racehorses to be over at the knee, therefore, they have an easier time breaking over, or bending. Behind the knee is less preferred. Obviously the ideal leg, is just that, ideal, but to be honest, I havent seen many horses that do have the "perfect, Ideal Leg!" lol

Like I said, hope my rambling made a little bit of sense to you! Lol
Yes! That does! Thank you for simplifying that for me. I have a tendency to overanalyze things and I think I was getting thrown off by the fact that the line didn't meet with the edge of her fetlock, but the way you've explained it makes sense. Thank you!
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    12-13-2012, 11:14 AM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by twp    
She is really cool looking. She has a bigger shoulder with arab legs, and neck.. She might be slightly back at the knee, but looks to me like she just has a longer pastern.
Yes, she is neat. She ended up being really fine boned, which oddly, neither her sire nor dam were, but with what you said, I assume that came from the Arab lineage. She's also extremely out of shape in these pictures which I think makes her legs look skinnier than they actually are! I found one more picture of her, but it's not much different than the previous ones. Would the longer pasterns give the illusion of being more back at the knee? I know longer pasterns also aren't ideal. Do either one of these cause any issues in the long term? So far, she has been sound as sound can be with absolutely no health issues and she's 11 years old.

Lilly 003.jpg
     
    12-13-2012, 11:48 AM
  #16
Yearling
Calf knee conformation or "back at the knee" occurs when the cannon bone slants backward causing the knee joint to be positioned too far back. This can be congenital, in which there is nothing to be done to fix it, or it can be caused by poor hoof balance. Regardless of what causes it, the knee is continuously hyperextended, thereby weakening the structure of the forelimb and predisposes the horse to osselets.

There is a comprehensive article in Equus concerning forelimb conformation if you are really interested. August 2012. Issue 419.
     
    12-13-2012, 12:33 PM
  #17
Yearling
Hm, I will have to see if I can access the article. I don't have a subscription to Equus... although it can never be a bad idea to get one. Her hooves in these pictures are not great. As I mentioned previously, she missed her regular farrier appointment due to a severe abscess where she was unable to bear weight on her front leg, so that could also be a contributing factor to her stance in these photos. I don't recall her legs seeming to be abnormal at any point, but I also wasn't looking for it so I could just be misremembering. I appreciate everyone's input on here.
     
    12-13-2012, 10:38 PM
  #18
Foal
Glynnis, I think you understand the concept of "back in the knee" right. Your confusion seems to be why somebody said your mare would be "back in the knee" - which she is not. She has long and a bit soft front pasterns, and somebody must have interpreted it wrong, maybe your mare wasn't standing straight in that picture. Beautiful horse, love the neck!
     
    12-14-2012, 12:06 PM
  #19
Yearling
Lol I think you might be right. I was trying to match two things that weren't ever going to match. I do know she has longer pasterns though. And thank you! I think she's pretty too, but that's because she's mine, so my opinion doesn't count for much!
     

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