Will the places will in with muscle, or is it just the way she's going to stay. - Page 2
   

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Will the places will in with muscle, or is it just the way she's going to stay.

This is a discussion on Will the places will in with muscle, or is it just the way she's going to stay. within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        04-30-2012, 07:51 AM
      #11
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HowClever    
    Won't speculate on the bump as the more pressing issue to me is how you think those pictures show a horse who has gained muscle?

    They clearly show a horse who has lost both condition AND weight.
    I don't think she is gained muscle. I said she is in the PROCCESS of regaining muscle. If you read what I said correctly, you'd know that she had a foal. Because of the foal she had months out of work, therefore it's common for a horse to loose muscle toning.
    And yes, she has lost weight because she's nursing a foal. We are feeding her 3 2 quart full scoops of high-protien grain 3 times a day, she has 24/7 access to grass, she also gets two flakes of hay twice a day. So stop judging and claiming that we are not taking care of our horses when you don't even know their diet.
         
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        05-01-2012, 01:11 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    If the horse is losing weight, the horse don't get enough food. It's quite simple to figure out.

    The horse is not losing weight because of the foal nursing. The horse is losing weight because the horse don't get enough food to keep both herself and her baby in a good condition.

    She will not be able to gain any kind of muscles or be in any kind of process of gaining muscles if she is losing weight.
    MN Tigerstripes likes this.
         
        05-01-2012, 04:49 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by StellaIW    
    If the horse is losing weight, the horse don't get enough food. It's quite simple to figure out.

    The horse is not losing weight because of the foal nursing. The horse is losing weight because the horse don't get enough food to keep both herself and her baby in a good condition.

    She will not be able to gain any kind of muscles or be in any kind of process of gaining muscles if she is losing weight.
    You have obviously never had a mare, much less knowlegde on one!
    I'm sorry that you van not keep your horses is in good condition, its no reason to take it out on a perfectly healthy mare.
         
        05-01-2012, 10:35 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by StellaIW    
    If the horse is losing weight, the horse don't get enough food. It's quite simple to figure out.

    The horse is not losing weight because of the foal nursing. The horse is losing weight because the horse don't get enough food to keep both herself and her baby in a good condition.

    She will not be able to gain any kind of muscles or be in any kind of process of gaining muscles if she is losing weight.

    Also, since my horse is so starved she's close to death, please explain further how you think that?



    I realize that she doesn't have great muscle toning, but skinny? No way. Unless you consider 100 pounds overweight well fed?

    For a mare who foaled less than 2 months ago, I personally, and every other person with breeding experience thinks she looks great!
    Newsflash: A mare that just had a foal isnt going to be some buff stud.

    An ignorant person who's never had experience with mares with foals has no say in what condition they should be in. It's quite simple to figure out.
         
        05-01-2012, 11:19 PM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Woah there. No one was saying you are starving your horse. It's a simple concept really - if the input is not equal to or exceeding the output, the horse WILL lose weight. Sure, mares lose condition when they foal out, but condition is not the same as weight. Your mare has clearly lose weight in the sequence of pictures you have shown.
         
        05-02-2012, 03:22 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    Where does it say that I don't know how to keep my horses in good condition?

    Where does it say that I think the horse is skinny?

    I only think that the horse needs more food in order to gain any kind of muscles.

    No I don't think she looks great for having a foal two months ago. Her top line don't look nice at all.

    This is a mare that I had last summer, she had a foal by her side, and foaled two months before this picture...

    She still is in good condition for riding and has a nice top line and butt.




    And her baby was looking great too.

    Cat, smrobs and Back2Horseback like this.
         
        05-02-2012, 10:04 AM
      #17
    Foal
    That horse is overweight, and she shouldn't be ridden that hard only two months after she had the baby. >.<
    There's no way that baby is 2 months, either.
         
        05-02-2012, 10:34 AM
      #18
    Showing
    Rodeo, I find your signature to be highly ironic.

    That 'overweight' mare happens to be a heavy breed. If you looked past what you thought was fat, you'd see that she's a LARGE boned animal.

    That foal could very well be 2 months old, depending on the breed.

    As far as not working a horse during pregnancy or before the foal is weaned, that's complete and utter hogwash. Pregnancy and nursing aren't a disease, and the best thing in the world for any animal, humans included, is to exercise before and after birth. That way, the animal stays in shape and doesn't get out of condition and flabby, like your mare.
    iridehorses, Wallaby, Cat and 4 others like this.
         
        05-02-2012, 10:40 AM
      #19
    Showing
    Speed Racer actually answered much more eloquently then I was about to. I was simply going to say that you were wrong on all three counts.

    A friend of mine who bought a mare from me 3 years ago just had her second baby 2 weeks ago. She not only looks great, but will be getting ready to be back to work in another 2 weeks. The mare doesn't look any the worse for giving birth in so far as weight is concerned.

    Sometimes it isn't the quantity of food but the quality.
    Cat, smrobs, Speed Racer and 3 others like this.
         
        05-02-2012, 10:40 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    The baby is not two months in the picture, he is about 3 months - 3,5, but you get an idea what the baby looked like. Apparently both mare and baby can look good.

    The horse is not overweight. The horse has a belly from having free choice of hay and 24/7 access to grass.

    But the neck, butt and ribs where perfect on this mare.

    You think 10 minutes of work in trot and canter, a few times a week is hard work?

    It's not, she was in good riding condition before she foaled. And the mare is a horse that wants to work - she competed in 140 cm jumping and is 11 years old this year. If the horse wants to work? Why not.

    A mare should have a little extra fat, and the ribs should be a little bit harder to feel on a mare that is pregnant or has a foal by her side, because - just as you wrote before - it takes a lot on a mare to nurse a baby. It's better for the mare to have a little bit extra, just in case.

    The mare should have a good top line even if she has a foal or is in foal.
    The warmblood mare that we have now is over 20 years old, in foal with her 7th foal and even she has a pretty nice top line.
         

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