Worst conformation faults?
   

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Worst conformation faults?

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  • Worst conformation faults horse
  • Worst conformation faults in horses

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  • 2 Post By goneriding

 
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    01-14-2013, 12:11 AM
  #1
Started
Worst conformation faults?

Not a critique, but about conformation...
What would you consider the worst conformation faults a horse could have? That would affect its performance the most?
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    01-14-2013, 12:29 AM
  #2
Banned
Going too far downhill from rump to wither....
Toed in.....
Toed out......
Posts for back legs.....

Not necessarily in that order either!
     
    01-14-2013, 12:33 AM
  #3
Trained
For me it is, without question, back at the knee, closely followed by any problems with the hind end. Then pasterns - can't be too long/weak/sloping and I don't like an upright pastern especially much either. Downhill build is a big no-no for me.

I ride jumpers, and a bit of eventing, so I need something that is built to jump and dressage. Legs are paramount and a good engine is very important.

Aesthetically, I don't like a badly set or skinny neck and will outright refuse to consider horses with bad necks because of this. I'm not a fan of an ugly head but will live with one if the rest of the horse is good.
     
    01-14-2013, 01:00 AM
  #4
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
For me it is, without question, back at the knee, closely followed by any problems with the hind end. Then pasterns - can't be too long/weak/sloping and I don't like an upright pastern especially much either. Downhill build is a big no-no for me.

I ride jumpers, and a bit of eventing, so I need something that is built to jump and dressage. Legs are paramount and a good engine is very important.

Aesthetically, I don't like a badly set or skinny neck and will outright refuse to consider horses with bad necks because of this. I'm not a fan of an ugly head but will live with one if the rest of the horse is good.
Good reply.....darn I forgot about the pasterns and knees! LOL!!! Yeah, an ugly neck.....will pretty much always be an ugly neck......takes a lot of continuous work to fix an ugly neck!!! If it's at all fixable!!!
     
    01-14-2013, 01:10 AM
  #5
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
Good reply.....darn I forgot about the pasterns and knees! LOL!!! Yeah, an ugly neck.....will pretty much always be an ugly neck......takes a lot of continuous work to fix an ugly neck!!! If it's at all fixable!!!
Depends if the ugly neck is muscling or structure. Mum's gelding has a horrible neck at the moment but the structure underneath is pretty darn nice, so with correct work he will end up having quite a nice neck. It does make correct work more difficult, though, to have a badly muscled neck. Between a horse with a good neck and a horse with a bad neck I will choose the horse with the good neck every time!
     
    01-14-2013, 06:18 AM
  #6
Yearling
It depends on how bad ANY fault is and what the horse is going to be used for. Some faults when minor in degree are major for a specific discipline. I don't like any faults but again, it depends on the type of fault and its severity and what the horse is being used for. I would not barrel race a horse that was even mildly calf kneed or mildly toed out or in. But being that these specific faults are on the mild side, one of a handful of possible areas the horse could still be used is on trail, true trail riding like climbing hills and such, more than likely without any long term physical issues. It depends on the overall conformation of the horse.
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    01-14-2013, 01:01 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Any conformation fault that will result in career ending lameness at a young age (for a horse doing work).

The ante is upped considerable for breeding horses. Most faults that are acceptable in a riding horse are totally unacceptable in a breeding animal.
     
    01-14-2013, 01:15 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Back at the knee.
     
    01-14-2013, 02:20 PM
  #9
Green Broke
No feet = no horse

I would say any issue with the feet or legs would be the "worst" for me.
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