7 month colt
 
 

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7 month colt

This is a discussion on 7 month colt within the Horse Grooming forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • When can you give a colt away
  • Month old colt being bad when time to come in

 
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    05-05-2010, 12:57 PM
  #1
Foal
7 month colt

ok I am a new horse owner, I have a 7 month old colt..and a pregnant mare which is due in oct..he is not her baby..I have 2 questions I need help with..one is would it be a good idea to seperate these too who have been together for months and freak out when I take the colt to walk him groom so forth which makes it hard cause he does not like being away from her..he has kicked me 2 times now with front legs..i took them both out yesterday and he acted a fool..i have a rope halter and I keep him close to me for that reason (being kicked) how can I get him to stop kicking..i don't want to do anything wrong to ruin him..any suggestions..so the 2 questions are bout seperating and him kicking..oh and when we took the mare out last night for and he didnt get to come out he litterally kicked toward me and kicked the fence...please help..much appreciated..again im a new owner..
     
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    05-05-2010, 01:23 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I would say get a trainer, or someone who really knows how to handle a naughty horse. If he is already getting away with this stuff now, just think of how he will grow up and act.... yikes!

Please just be careful!
     
    05-05-2010, 02:12 PM
  #3
Showing
You need professional help to teach you how to handle your colt.

Since you're an admitted new owner, the best thing you can do for your horses and yourself is to have someone come out and help you put some manners on them.

That 7 m/o already sounds like a hellion, and he's only going to get worse if you don't have someone who can teach him how he's supposed to act around humans. You sound like you're clueless too, so all of you could benefit from training.

He's also horribly herd bound, which is why he acts like a lunatic when you separate him from his herd mate. They need to be weaned off each other, especially since you have a new foal coming.

If he isn't already, he needs to be gelded as soon as his testicles drop. A bad mannered gelding is awful, but a bad mannered colt is much, much worse.
     
    05-11-2010, 07:55 PM
  #4
Yearling
If you are into reading, try a book called "Horses Don't Lie".... it explains how horses are prey and therefore how they think. I am not suggesting that a book will solve your problems, but I do think learning as much as you can (reading, lessons, talking to others) will be helpful.
     
    05-12-2010, 08:33 AM
  #5
Yearling
You definitely need to work on separating the colt and pregnant mare. She will clean his clock once she foals, and he could hurt the foal just trying to play. Do you have a barn with stalls? You could start by stalling them next to each other at night and work from there, gradually separating them more.

As far as the behavior of your colt, that needs to be handled immediately. Believe me, I am speaking from experience! I bought my boy at a month old and he was my first. Although I have been working with horses for quite a while and knew better I was so infatuated with him I let him get away with bad behavior and had to work 5 times as hard to get him back in line. Didn't help that he was a pretty aggressive, destructive little turd from birth and very big and strong. I really think you need to at least talk to someone with experience handling young horses and watch them interact with your boy or another youngster. You are going to have to step into the role of "mother/teacher" for him, and show him how he is allowed to behave and what is completely unacceptable. I would recommend getting a good book or two on groundwork, that's the first step IMO. There are a zillion different trainers and methods you can look into, but I do like a lot of Clinton Andersons methods for ground training.
     
    05-12-2010, 09:12 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Sounds like he needs weaned from his adopted mother. I would take him off property and far away for a couple of months.
     
    05-12-2010, 09:19 AM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque    
sounds like he needs weaned from his adopted mother. I would take him off property and far away for a couple of months.
i agree, that's the easiest way to go about it. Complete cut off...
     
    05-12-2010, 09:59 AM
  #8
Foal
See if a friend of yours that has horses would be willing to swap a horse to take on your colt. I did that once when we lost our mare and her colt took to our other mare.
     
    05-13-2010, 05:38 AM
  #9
Trained
Ok striking (kicking with front legs) is NOT ON!!! That and rearing make me shudder, striking is more often than not out of pure aggression and your horse dominating you. He needs to be gelded as soon as his testicles drop and sent off to someone who has extensive experience in handling pushy colts for a while. If they get away with this behaviour at a young age, it will be one hell of a job trying to get it out of him when it comes time to handle him once he's fully grown. Why a first time horse owner has purchased a young colt and a pregnant mare eludes me, but it's too late now so cure will have to be the way.

As for separating them... how is the mare when you take the colt away? If she is very attached to him and will panic when he leaves, you'll need to find her a friend, just a cheap shetland or mini, or a friends horse that is happy to live with your mare for a few months. If you separate them and your mare panics, she can very easily abort the foal. But equally as dangerous is having her in with a colt, even at 7 months old, he may cause he to come into season and slip her foal.

If the mare is ok about having the colt taken from her sight, get him out of there and to a trainer, or into a paddock full of horses that will boss him around and put him back in his box would be more appropriate for a young horse. It would certainly be best for your mare to have a friend still though, it's not fair to keep any horse, particularly a pregnant mare, in isolation.
     
    05-13-2010, 10:25 AM
  #10
Foal
Thank you so much..i love reading and I will look for the book..again thank you....
     

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