horse freaks out when i tie him up - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 25 Old 09-18-2011, 10:52 PM Thread Starter
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horse freaks out when i tie him up

My horse freaks out after about one minute of being tied up. In all other ways he is calm and easy to work with. He is a four year old gelding Smokey Mountain and is only ground trained. I use natural horsemanship techniques and am a relative novice so I'd love some ideas of how to fix this. Last night he broke the snap on his lead when I tied him and tried to groom him. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
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post #2 of 25 Old 09-18-2011, 11:07 PM
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I ruined a horse to tying by her learning to pull. It took her 1 time to learn she could pull and get off. But...don't let put you off. Its going to be a long process of teaching him its ok to be tied and that he can't pull to get off and away. One way to do it would to be during grooming time. Start by making him stand, no halter, no lead rope, and just love and groom on him when he stands still. After you have that down, put the halter on him. If he moves, don't touch the halter, just put pressure on his body to put him back. After this is where you would like it to be, clip a lead rope to the halter. Have him stand still and let the lead go slack. Of course, keep an eye on it so he doesn't trip up but just groom and love on him when he's where you want him. Next, stand him next to a fence, halter and lead rope on, and just lay the lead on the fence. If he moves, just put him back where he needs to be. Don't ever get frustrated that he doesn't stand at first or isn't going along quick enough. Once you are to the point that you have the lead draped and your comfortable, tie the lead loosely for a few seconds and if he stands quietly, untie the lead and give him a break. At this point in the process, it could have taken weeks or months, but that doesn't matter. Just so long as he's comfortable and knows what is being asked of him. Once you're to the point of tying him for a short time, just gradually increase the time he's tied. Keep him busy and thinking while he's tied. Try not to let him focuse on being tied. Just take your time in breaking him of this. It might take a long time, it might take a week. Just let him take his time and yours so that the both of you are comfortable.
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post #3 of 25 Old 09-18-2011, 11:15 PM
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Purchase yourself a Blocker Tie Ring and use it religiously. Also sounds like you could use the help of a professional trainer.
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post #4 of 25 Old 09-18-2011, 11:22 PM
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Another option is rather than tying him to begin with simply pass the rope through the twine have a gentle hold of the other end. If he gets worried feed a little more rope through but be prepared to met with gentle pressure if he begins to pull slightly keep pressure momentarily then feed more rope and give a release. Most times the horse will pull back hit pressure and then panic, if there is a release from that pressure you avoid the panic and don't teach them to pull.
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post #5 of 25 Old 09-19-2011, 12:12 AM
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I wish I could find a method to solving tying issues with my Appaloosa but in eight years nothing has worked. He is taught to stay still by just saying stand. If you say stand he won't even so much as move an inch. I had to teach him this due to the fact he has never learned to tie and still to this day no method I have ever tried even remotely phases him. So even if you can't get your horse out of this there are other things you can teach him to make it just as easy.

Shorty * N * Opie
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post #6 of 25 Old 09-19-2011, 09:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prinella View Post
Another option is rather than tying him to begin with simply pass the rope through the twine have a gentle hold of the other end. If he gets worried feed a little more rope through but be prepared to met with gentle pressure if he begins to pull slightly keep pressure momentarily then feed more rope and give a release. Most times the horse will pull back hit pressure and then panic, if there is a release from that pressure you avoid the panic and don't teach them to pull.
This is what I suggest ... I went on a ride yesterday and we had 4 horses - before we'd had them tied for 5 minutes, 2 horses broke their leads. I knew Spot was afraid of fly spray and got antsy when you went to saddle him, so I untied the knot and fed the rope through but held on to the end that wasn't attached to him. That way when he pulled back, I could give him enough slack to where he didn't pull and break something. In situations like that when you're in public and can't risk a broken snap, that method is best. Now when you're actually working the horse, I would use the same approach, but in a different way:

Take a long line, like a lunge rope or something similar, and grab a buggy whip, and use something solid (like the big rings on the trailer or a hefty hitching post) to feed the rope through/around. Hold the excess in one hand and the whip in the other, and stand back a bit. Every now and then, put a bit of pressure on the rope so that the horse feels the pressure on his poll (typically what induces a lay-back). If the horse lays back, push him forward with the buggy whip. As soon as he jumps forward, take all the pressure off. It worked for my TB gelding that would lay back when he was tied alone.


EQUILOVE

Last edited by Equilove; 09-19-2011 at 09:43 AM.
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post #7 of 25 Old 09-19-2011, 10:39 AM
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I would suggest teaching the horse to hobble or simply just tying him to something sturdy with a sturdy halter an lead and let him get over himself. I would leave him tied. Once you start doing things with him, let him freak out let him pull back, just get out of the way! Do not panic do not try to untie him. Once he stands calmly for a good while then and only then would I untie him. Hope this helps.
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post #8 of 25 Old 09-19-2011, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by bubba13 View Post
Purchase yourself a Blocker Tie Ring and use it religiously. Also sounds like you could use the help of a professional trainer.
These work very well and you might find a video about them on line
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post #9 of 25 Old 09-19-2011, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by .Delete. View Post
I would suggest teaching the horse to hobble or simply just tying him to something sturdy with a sturdy halter an lead and let him get over himself. I would leave him tied. Once you start doing things with him, let him freak out let him pull back, just get out of the way! Do not panic do not try to untie him. Once he stands calmly for a good while then and only then would I untie him. Hope this helps.
This doesn't sound like something for a novice to do.
Sounds like an accident waiting to happen.
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post #10 of 25 Old 09-19-2011, 10:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubba13 View Post
Purchase yourself a Blocker Tie Ring and use it religiously. Also sounds like you could use the help of a professional trainer.
Yes & yes. I've 'cured' some very die hard pullers with the tie ring. Fast, easy & safe.
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