How to become a farrier - Page 2
 
 

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How to become a farrier

This is a discussion on How to become a farrier within the Horse Grooming forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
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        09-27-2010, 10:27 AM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Its not an easy thing for a person who doesnt know much about horses. I don't mean to be offending but you do need to learn more about them first. You can go to school and learn about becoming a farrier but if you decide to start a buisness of your own or decide to trim someones horse, you need to be careful that you have a plan if you accidentally cut to short or trim wrong. Also, every horse is different and handles different. Some have never been trimmed, some don't mind their fronts done but will kick you if you touch their backs and its a good idea to know how to handle a situation in a professional manner. How to be gentle and firm at the same time. I don't know how the farriers do it honestly. I would have a broken back firstly. Sweat your butt off on the hottest day, or have 100 horses in one day to trim/shoe. Kudos to the farriers. Farmerjeff, I think you can do what ever you want and in the midst of learning you learn how to handle horses too. Like someone said, see if you could become an apprentice. I watch my farrier constantly but I don't think I could do it myself. No confidence. You can do a little studying on your colt. Take a look at his feet, hold them up look at the shape, the frog, the sole. Hope you can find someone to help you learn more. It is an interesting job to say the least.
         
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        09-27-2010, 05:45 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Done some research on becoming one and it roughly cost 4 to 5 thousand dollars. So thinking of another field. Plus my back probably couldnt take it. Bad enough now!
         
        09-27-2010, 06:47 PM
      #13
    Trained
    Quote:
    I got my start with attending a one day clinic, researching a lot, reading many books and watching DVDs, as well as watching many other farriers work. Not enough of a start to get into the professional market, IMO. This is why I only trim my own horses (and those kept on my property.)
    This is what I did, and am trimming my own and the other horse that lives with mine. It is a fascinating journey. But by golly it is physically hard, expecially with an already weak back. My dad built me a nifty hoof stand though which makes it much easier. I still get our trimmer to come out and do the more drastic trims and check my progress.
         
        09-27-2010, 06:51 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    I believe there could possibly be financial aid for a program like that? I'm not positive but it may be worth looking into.
         
        09-27-2010, 06:53 PM
      #15
    Green Broke
    W_S same here with the bad back, it's no fun! I have a good hoofjack but more often then not I just hold the legs between my knees anyways and only use the hoofjack when I stretch them forward. I had a local amish guy checking my work initially for quite some time, until he told me to stop paying him to do nothing. He assured me I was doing fine and didn't need "supervised" anymore.

    It's been suggested to me a few times to start doing other people's horses for pay, and honestly, I don't want to. I don't enjoy it. I get satisfaction from it, sure. I do it for my own horses because it was simply the best solution for me and my horses. But it's hot, sweaty, backbreaking work, and not something I ever intend to do as a career!
         
        09-27-2010, 06:57 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Ditto! I don't enjoy it, but I do like knowing exactly what is happening with my own horses feet and I do enjoy the learning part. I find the hoof and it's healthy function fascinating!

    Dad made me a stand the same as the ones they sold at the school I went to, so it has a foam cradle to put the foot on underneath - Because I am horrible at holding it between my knees, I nearly fall over! And then you swap that head out for the rubber stop for out in front. It's handy having a handyman around!
         
        09-27-2010, 08:03 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wild_spot    
    Because I am horrible at holding it between my knees, I nearly fall over!
    Ahh, tell me about it, Claymore sometimes tends to be a leaner (he's improving, but...) his fat butt leaning on me doesn't help my back at all! But he gets dropped and told off when that happens. I can use the cradle for the hoofjack on hind legs, and I can use them on the fores on Finn and Misty, but my other kiddos are NOT real great yet about holding still as they should, so I feel safer holding them where I can set them down quickly if I need to.
         
        09-27-2010, 09:26 PM
      #18
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Indyhorse    
    It's been suggested to me a few times to start doing other people's horses for pay, and honestly, I don't want to. I don't enjoy it. I get satisfaction from it, sure. I do it for my own horses because it was simply the best solution for me and my horses. But it's hot, sweaty, backbreaking work, and not something I ever intend to do as a career!
    It is sweaty work, but I really enjoy not having to pay someone 3x$35 every trim!
         
        09-27-2010, 09:48 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
    It is sweaty work, but I really enjoy not having to pay someone 3x$35 every trim!

    Yes, for sure!! Since I now have 9 horses on the property, and the only decent barefoot trimmer I had found at all (who had stopped being able to come out during winter months because she drove from across the state) charged me $50 per a horse per trim....50x9=$450 a month (although of course, I wouldn't be paying for the 3 of them that don't belong to me, if that were the case!) it's way more than financially making sense to do it myself!

    I also always thought it was kind of unfair that she charged me the same $50 for my perfectly well mannered, holds-her-feet-up-for-you little 11 hand welsh mare as she did for my big, sometimes unruly, draft crosses!
         
        09-28-2010, 04:14 PM
      #20
    Foal
    I trim all of our horses and its hard and hot work. I do enjoy learning more and I enjoy triming my mares my wifes geildings are a pain. Oh get ready to get kicked and leaned on and everything else. Go ahead and buy good tools also the cheap ones are just that cheap and don't hold up.
         

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