Pulling back at the hitching post
   

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Pulling back at the hitching post

This is a discussion on Pulling back at the hitching post within the Horse Grooming forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horse pulls back on hitching posts
  • Horse gets nervouse at hitching post

 
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    12-17-2010, 05:45 PM
  #1
Foal
Pulling back at the hitching post

My pony has some trust issues, i'll start with that. I am the only one he trusts. I want to lease him out but he has a problem right now that im concerned to lease him out with. When he is tied up at the hitching post, he is fine as long as the line is slack, but as soon as he steps back and it tightens he freaks out. My first instinct was just to let him fight it out, but he has broken some halters like this and I was getting concerned he would hurt himself. He does the same thing if he steps on his leadline, he basically freaks out whenever there is tension on the line that doesnt give. Does anyone have any tips on how to train him so he knows its ok if his line tenses up and doesnt give? FYI he is fine if its not giving when im on the other end of the line, if I am pulling he is fine, I think its because im alive and flexible, I move with him a little, where the post doesnt give at all.
     
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    12-17-2010, 07:49 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Blocker Tie Rings at horsefriendly.com Tack Shop
Here you go
     
    12-22-2010, 05:01 PM
  #3
Foal
Have him stand there with the line tight and be there to reasure him. Once he settles, unhitch and go do something fun, and try again later. Maybe give remards while the line is tight, so He will learn that it is a nice place to be.
     
    12-22-2010, 05:18 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Pressure and release. Repeatedly! Throw the lead over the post and hold on to the rope. When he starts to get nervous and tightens the rope give a little slack to him. You can also try just holding the lead and pull down. He will resist but don't give in. The slightest try of him giving to the pressure give him slack immediately. If he freaks out now, it may take some time for him to trust that he isn't going to die. And he will freak out when you try to regain his trust on this. His reaction is a claustrophobic one.
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    12-22-2010, 10:55 PM
  #5
Foal
I'm in love with this product called "the clip" it's a clip that you put your leadrope through and you can adjust the resistance a horse gets. It's specifically made for those horses that do pull back or even the horses that don't but you just want to be safe. The leadrope loops through and you tie a stopper knot near the end. Then you set the resistance with the screw. What happens is that your horse pulls back because they freak themself out or something happened and the horse feels a slight tension due to the resistance on the clip but they get a slight release so they can't break the halter or leadrope. Then they don't feel it pulling on them anymore and they typically will relax. It's easy to adjust the length and resistance too. If you tie to a post or something without a bar small enough to clip it onto, they also sell rings that you can put around something to clip it to.

SmartTie Products

There are a few demo videos on the site that will help you understand the use of it better. John Lyons is also uses one in a video and explains how it helps you teach your horse how to tie. Yes, I know he's a famous trainer and everyone has their opinions on the well known trainers but it's not just from him he just chose to use the product. :]
     

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