Rain Rot and Clipping
   

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Rain Rot and Clipping

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  • If u clip a horse with rainrot
  • Rainrot clipping

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    12-01-2011, 10:34 AM
  #1
Green Broke
Rain Rot and Clipping

So Rodeo's had rain rot for quite some time now, and everything that I do seems to help a little bit at first, but then it comes back. He didnt react well to M-T-G what so ever. I went and checked the horse he goes out to pasture with, and she doesnt have it. But I did notice that he seems to have a much thicker coat than the rest of the horses there. Although it gets cold at night, it has been getting close to 80 some days here in NC.

So my first question is, could sweat be causing the rain rot? Its only on his hindquarters, and coming up his back.

Second question, would it help if I clipped him, and then blanketed him when it was cold?

Any and all info would be greatly appreciated!!!


Thanks
     
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    12-01-2011, 10:58 AM
  #2
Super Moderator
I'm not super experienced with rain rot but this last summer, at camp, one of the older horses came in with it so I got to get rid of it. Yay! Haha
The stuff I used on that guy was this stuff: http://www.amazon.com/Mane-Tail-Pro-Tect-Medicated-Shampoo/dp/B000A6ZLN0/ref=sr_1_4?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1322754751&sr=1-4 plus I added Vitamin A to his diet since I heard that can help.
It only took one shampooing to really see the difference in the RR (even when this horse was standing out in the rain etc) and after 3 shampoos (I was only able to shampoo once a week, it'd probably work better shampooing more often) the rain rot was gone. The one this I did notice about that shampoo is that you have to follow the instructions that say to leave the shampoo on for at least 10 minutes exactly. Longer is even better but any shorter that 10 minutes and you don't see any real results.

I'd imagine that blanketing Rodeo might be counter productive (not to mention having to seriously wash your blanket afterwards) since it's a fungal infection that thrives in warm, moist conditions, but I really don't know...

I hope you are able to get it taken care of quickly, rain rot is the worst.
     
    12-01-2011, 11:03 AM
  #3
Showing
I'm dealing with rain rot too, so subbing.
     
    12-01-2011, 11:04 AM
  #4
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallaby    
I'm not super experienced with rain rot but this last summer, at camp, one of the older horses came in with it so I got to get rid of it. Yay! Haha
The stuff I used on that guy was this stuff: Amazon.com: Mane N Tail Pro-Tect Medicated Shampoo: Sports & Outdoors plus I added Vitamin A to his diet since I heard that can help.
It only took one shampooing to really see the difference in the RR (even when this horse was standing out in the rain etc) and after 3 shampoos (I was only able to shampoo once a week, it'd probably work better shampooing more often) the rain rot was gone. The one this I did notice about that shampoo is that you have to follow the instructions that say to leave the shampoo on for at least 10 minutes exactly. Longer is even better but any shorter that 10 minutes and you don't see any real results.

I'd imagine that blanketing Rodeo might be counter productive (not to mention having to seriously wash your blanket afterwards) since it's a fungal infection that thrives in warm, moist conditions, but I really don't know...

I hope you are able to get it taken care of quickly, rain rot is the worst.


Thanks Wallaby!! Only thing is, is that although its still getting warm during the day, by the time Im done work, and Im able to get out to the barn, the sun is just about gone, and its pretty chilly....so I don't know how leaving it in would work with it being cooler.

Its really strange weather, well for me anyways, I grew up in NH, when it was warm, it was warm, when it was cold, it was cold. Here where I am in NC, itll be freezing in the am, warm up, to tshirt weather, and then freeze off again!!! I can't get used to it, and I think Rodeo might be having a hard time adjusting to it as well. Last time I did give him a bath, it def helped....so maybe I just need to do it a few more times, and see if it clears it up?

This was the shampoo I was using....

Eqyss Micro-Tek Natural Medicated Shampoo < Medicated Coat Applications < Horse Grooming Supplies|Dover Saddlery.
     
    12-01-2011, 11:08 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
I'm dealing with rain rot too, so subbing.


Its just frustrating for me! I know there are several posts on this, but Im having such a hard time with it right now

I was able to pick majority of the scabs off when it first stated, used this shampoo, and it seemed to help. But within, I don't know the past two weeks or so, it has come back full force, and he doesnt want me to mess with it a whole lot. He actually flinches if I try to pick all the scabs off.

It actually feels like he had a cut, or scrape, and it has scabbed over, but if you look at it, its a bunch of small bumps. I just want to get rid of it for the poor guy. I know that usually it doesnt bother them, but I feel like its making him sore. He does have a small spot on his back from it that the scabs will not come off, and when I try to get them off, he flinches, and tries to walk off.

Thanks for the info though Wallaby!! Im def going to have to do something before its too late!
     
    12-01-2011, 11:14 AM
  #6
Showing
Yeah rain rot attaches to the bottom of the hair so if you try to peel it off.. it pulls the hair out which hurts. My boy trusts and tolerates me a lot and he deals with me picking at his scabs and his rain rot. I was told to bathe him at least 3 times a week but it's too cold here and our "hot water" isn't even warm. And I already got yelled at by one of the managers for bathing my horse when it's not summer.

I'm conflicted.
     
    12-01-2011, 11:19 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Yeah rain rot attaches to the bottom of the hair so if you try to peel it off.. it pulls the hair out which hurts. My boy trusts and tolerates me a lot and he deals with me picking at his scabs and his rain rot. I was told to bathe him at least 3 times a week but it's too cold here and our "hot water" isn't even warm. And I already got yelled at by one of the managers for bathing my horse when it's not summer.

I'm conflicted.

My guy let me pick it off for quite some time, but now I think its just too painful for him, he lets me get a few off, and starts flinching so. But yeah, like I said, by the time I go out to the barn after work, its pretty chilly.....Im going to try my hardest to get out there today when its still warm. We'll see how that goes ;)
     
    12-01-2011, 11:48 AM
  #8
Weanling
If it isnt clearing up perhaps try VItamin A. Some don't even treat their horses, they simply add |Vitamin A to their diet and it clears up. We have never had a problem with rain rot but then we also make sure their supplement has Vitamin A in it so I think it works well.
     
    12-01-2011, 11:59 AM
  #9
Showing
How do you usually give it to your horse.. is it a supplement powder you buy and sprinkle over their grain? He's never ever had rain rot.. it started when I moved to MD and it appeared on his rump and on his shoulder
     
    12-01-2011, 12:21 PM
  #10
Weanling
Ours is fed in a supplement. Here is an article about VItamin A requirements for horses. Its a bit of a long read but it does give you amounts and requirements etc. I was told it can also be fed orally but we have never done so.

VITAMIN A and HORSES
Dr. Frederick Harper
Extension Horse Specialist
Animal Science Department
University of Tennessee
Many individuals take a multiple vitamin daily. Some people even take individual
Vitamins such as vitamin A.
So, vitamin A should be well-known by most horse owners. Do you know that your
Horse may need a source of vitamin A now?
Vitamin A is important in vision, reproduction, digestion and respiration. The
Epithelium cells which line the reproductive, digestive and respiratory tracts require
Vitamin A to be normal and healthy. Vitamin A also is important in bone remodeling in
Young, growing horses.
Vitamin A as such is not found in nature. It occurs as carotenes, which are
Commonly called provitamin A. The carotenes are converted to vitamin A in the lining of
The small intestine of horses. Horses are not as efficient in converting carotenes to vitamin
A as are some other animals. This is the reason that the blood plasma of horses is rather
Yellow.
Carotene is in high concentration in green forages and is also found in yellow corn.
Since light and heat destroy carotenes, sun cured hays are lower in carotenes than fresh,
Green forages. Hays cut at late stages of maturity, rained on and/or with extended field
Curing are of poorer quality and have less carotenes than good or high-quality hays. High-
Quality hays, such as alfalfa, can contain rather large amounts of carotenes. Carotenes
From alfalfa hay is more available than that from grass hays.

It has been shown that in winter the horse=s blood levels of carotene and vitamin A
Decline. Another decline is often observed in mid to late summer. These lower plasma
Values are correlated to forage intake. In winter, horses are fed hays which have a lower
Carotene level than spring pasture forages. In mid to late summer, pasture forages are less
Productive. The fact that blood levels of carotene and vitamin A increase in spring and in
Fall reflect the value of green pasture forages as a source of carotenes.
Some of the problems noted in a vitamin A deficiency are night blindness, tearing,
Poor skin, poor growth, impaired reproduction, respiratory infections, rough hair coats
And declining plasma, liver and kidney vitamin A levels.
Feeding excessive vitamin A also can cause problems. Unthriftiness was noted in
Ponies fed excessive vitamin A for 15 weeks. Following the unthriftiness, the ponies had
Rough hair coats, poor muscle tone and were depressed. After 20 weeks, large areas of hair
Were lost. The ponies were periodically in-coordinated, severely depressed and laid down
Most of the time.
The toxic level of vitamin A is 454 IU (International Units) per pound of body
Weight. So 544,800 IU of vitamin A would be toxic for a 1,200 pound horse which is more
Than 10 times the recommended level.
Recently data from Virginia Polytechnic Institute noted that broodmares with
Access to pasture during the winter had a depletion in their vitamin A levels. If the
Broodmares were fed two-year-old hay and a grain mix without any vitamin A in dry lots,
They became marginally vitamin A deficient within two months.
These same researchers showed that the serum vitamin A levels of weanlings were
Lower than for their dams on the same feeding programs. These weanlings were kept on

Pasture and fed hay or hay and concentrates. They concluded that weanlings should be
Supplemented with vitamin A regardless of diet.
Where low-quality hay was fed this winter, vitamin A status of horses could be
Marginal at best if they were not fed a grain mix that was fortified with sufficient
Vitamin A. This could especially be a problem for broodmares that will foal and be re-bred
This spring or open mares designated to be bred this spring as well as young, growing
Horses that turned a yearling this winter. Since hay quality was lower than normally
Recommended to be fed to horses in some areas, broodmare and yearling owners which had
These conditions this winter needs to consider feeding a supplemental vitamin A source this
Spring.
Spring forages are a good source of carotenes; however, in animals with a low level
Of vitamin A, it will take longer to replenish their body vitamin A stores. This delay could
Be occurring when mares are getting ready to foal, produce colostrum and/or being bred.
Yearlings normally have a growth spurt associated with lush spring pastures. Their
Growth could be less or delayed until vitamin A levels are restored from spring grass.
Vitamin A can be supplies by fortified grain mixes, alfalfa hay or a vitamin
Supplement. It is advisable to select a vitamin supplement that has 10 parts of vitamin A to
1 part vitamin D. For individuals who have their feed mixed or mix their feed on the farm,
They can add a vitamin A pre-mix to these grain mixes.
Pregnant broodmares that weigh 1,200 pounds in their last trimester or early
Lactation need about 50,000 IU per day. Feeding a slightly larger amount of vitamin A
Would aid in replenishing vitamin A stores.
Yearlings weighing about 775 pounds need 24,400 IU of vitamin A daily.

Broodmares and/or yearlings on good quality spring pasture probably only need a
Vitamin A supplement for one to two months.
     

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