Roaching?
 
 

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Roaching?

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  • Ca yearlings get sweetitch

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    02-06-2013, 12:06 AM
  #1
Yearling
Roaching?

Hey all,

Since Mudpie's out with a suspensory injury, and we ended up having to purchase the stall next to him to prevent a man from moving his fence-fighting horse there, I've been considering bringing my mother's morgan, Morgan, to the barn (she currently lives about an hour away on 200 acres of pasture with my mother's other four horses) and riding her while Mudpie is injured.

Morgan has had a small history of "skin problems." She developed what I believed to be sweet itch this past summer, and, though my mother never bothered to treat her or take her to a vet, ended up rubbing the top of her tail completely raw. As in, there was only small bits of stubble on the top part of her tailbone. Regardless, now that it's winter and she's running through the trees and brush, she apparently has ticks pretty bad, and half of her mane is missing.

Once she comes to me, I will be getting her healthy, and I've been seriously considering roaching her mane. I was wondering: is there any technique to it? Is it like a bridle path, but just all the way down her neck? Is it easy/hard to mess up? What is the standard "procedure"?

:) I'd really appreciate all of your input/advice/experience, so that I don't mess the poor girl up any more than she already is!

Thanks!
     
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    02-06-2013, 12:14 AM
  #2
Yearling
For those of you who were curious, here are some pictures of her, healthy and happy about one or two years ago! None of them were taken specifically of her, but here you go! :)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 388215_1971299581350_621028784_n.jpg (71.0 KB, 118 views)
File Type: jpg Screen Shot 2013-02-05 at 8.11.57 PM.jpg (7.3 KB, 112 views)
File Type: jpg Screen Shot 2013-02-05 at 8.12.41 PM.jpg (19.9 KB, 115 views)
     
    02-06-2013, 01:04 AM
  #3
Trained
She'll need her mane for the bugs, summer is not far. I'd leave her what she has and start "leveling" once she has new growth coming in.
For sweet itch it would help her if she could be inside, or at least in a dark shed, when the gnats are out, dusk and dawn.
I used Avon Skin-so-Soft bath oil on crest and tail, put some in my hand and just wipe it over the surface, no rubbing it in. Keeps the gnats and other bugs away, smells good and helps detangling. Applying it early morning and late afternoon would be ideal, once a day is minimum. Also a change of feed, rather meager, will help. No alfalfa or high speed grain. Grass hay, a vit/min supplement and flax.
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mudpie likes this.
     
    02-06-2013, 01:19 AM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
She'll need her mane for the bugs, summer is not far. I'd leave her what she has and start "leveling" once she has new growth coming in.
For sweet itch it would help her if she could be inside, or at least in a dark shed, when the gnats are out, dusk and dawn.
I used Avon Skin-so-Soft bath oil on crest and tail, put some in my hand and just wipe it over the surface, no rubbing it in. Keeps the gnats and other bugs away, smells good and helps detangling. Applying it early morning and late afternoon would be ideal, once a day is minimum. Also a change of feed, rather meager, will help. No alfalfa or high speed grain. Grass hay, a vit/min supplement and flax.
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Thanks! I'm mainly concerned about the ticks. I'll be deworming her shortly after she arrives, but I've had loads of experience picking tick after tick out of manes, and I think it might be more effective if I roached it.

I don't know how much of a risk factor ticks are (not sure how rampant lyme disease is in the middle of California xD) but I'd really like to get them all off. I'll definitely take the time to hunt the little buggers out, though.

I don't know for sure if it was sweet itch, or perhaps she was just struggling with worms? I'd left property and was staying primarily at the new house, and never got a close look. It just upsets me a lot, and there's nothing I can do for any animals but Mudpie, so I just have to grit my teeth and focus on his adorable self.

Oh, and I can get her a fly sheet with a neck cover if need be! (:

Thanks for your ideas! :)
     
    02-06-2013, 01:30 AM
  #5
Trained
Don't envy you for the tick job...at all
There is a spray version of one if the dog spot-on's, can't think of the name right now, white bottle with blue sprayer. I soaked ticks in that. They die and fall off. Just can't get myself to touch them*shudder*
     
    02-06-2013, 01:51 AM
  #6
Weanling
Freedom 45 Spot-On - Horse.com

I use this to prevent ticks, and I think I heard someone say that they put it on their horse close to a tick and it fell off dead in seconds! Not sure if it works THAT well but it's worth a shot I think. At the very least, it's kept them off of my guy. It's a lot less icky than picking them out live and you don't have to worry about heads getting stuck. Just apply it ASAP because while it's not totally rampant, lyme disease can still be a problem in CA. What area are you in? I'm in the bay area, but have lived in central Cali for most of my life.
     
    02-06-2013, 02:28 AM
  #7
Trained
Pet Supplies - Pet Products - Pet Food | Petco.com

That's the one I meant.
     
    02-06-2013, 02:41 AM
  #8
Weanling
For sweet itch horses (I've dealt with a few) I always hog the mane (or roach it... whatever you guys call it on that side of the pond). It lets you get better access to the sores they can develop under the mane. However, if you are going to hog the mane, then get them a good sweet itch rug that will cover them up from the flies, as without the mane they do have less protection. A good fly sheet, lots of fly spray (avon skin so soft is good, I tend to make my own with cold tea, citronella and skin so soft) and wound cream applied daily to the worst bits, and then try to have them stabled when the flies are worst I.e. Sunrise and sunset. Horses with sweet itch, with good management, you can barely tell they've got it.
     
    02-06-2013, 03:48 AM
  #9
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
Don't envy you for the tick job...at all
There is a spray version of one if the dog spot-on's, can't think of the name right now, white bottle with blue sprayer. I soaked ticks in that. They die and fall off. Just can't get myself to touch them*shudder*
Oh yes, it's disgusting. The bigger they are, the more terrible twisting them off is! >.<

I'll check out the spot on stuff, but I may just do it by hand since I've got to buy a Nibble Net and this ridiculously expensive poultice that may or may not give Mudpie more of a fighting chance at a better recovery. And that. ;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2BigReds    
Freedom 45 Spot-On - Horse.com

I use this to prevent ticks, and I think I heard someone say that they put it on their horse close to a tick and it fell off dead in seconds! Not sure if it works THAT well but it's worth a shot I think. At the very least, it's kept them off of my guy. It's a lot less icky than picking them out live and you don't have to worry about heads getting stuck. Just apply it ASAP because while it's not totally rampant, lyme disease can still be a problem in CA. What area are you in? I'm in the bay area, but have lived in central Cali for most of my life.
Once I get her in to a stall, she won't have a problem with gaining new ticks, it'll just be a matter of playing monkey and eeking them all out! ;)

I live between Fresno and Yosemite, about 30ish minutes from both (if you drive like my mother, anyway) in a teensy town that no one's ever heard of. XD I'm fairly new to the area though; up until last June, I lived in Auberry (another tiny town that no one knows of).

Quote:
Originally Posted by minstrel    
For sweet itch horses (I've dealt with a few) I always hog the mane (or roach it... whatever you guys call it on that side of the pond). It lets you get better access to the sores they can develop under the mane. However, if you are going to hog the mane, then get them a good sweet itch rug that will cover them up from the flies, as without the mane they do have less protection. A good fly sheet, lots of fly spray (avon skin so soft is good, I tend to make my own with cold tea, citronella and skin so soft) and wound cream applied daily to the worst bits, and then try to have them stabled when the flies are worst I.e. Sunrise and sunset. Horses with sweet itch, with good management, you can barely tell they've got it.
Thanks, that's all really valuable information! :) Hopefully she doesn't have sweet itch and was just reacting to the pond grass stuff that the horses eat when the grazing gets low. XD Irregardless, I'll keep a close eye on her and keep her covered. :)



Do you guys have any tips on technique, or how I should go about roaching/hogging said mane? My understanding thus far is that you usually take scissors and trim it down and then take clippers and shave it like you would a bridle path. Anything else I should know? :) Thanks!!
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    02-06-2013, 10:51 AM
  #10
Weanling
That's how I do it - cut as much with scissors as your horse will allow, then clip from the bridle path down, keeping it nice and short
     

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