Should I shoe or not? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 90 Old 12-17-2013, 09:44 PM
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^My farriers have alway provided honest opinions as to whether or not a horse needed shoes. I think most would take a loyal and happy customer (because that means repeated business) than shoes on every horse, when it may not be the best choice.
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post #22 of 90 Old 12-17-2013, 10:01 PM
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I second that,,,, my farrier recommended pulling shoes in winter.
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post #23 of 90 Old 12-17-2013, 10:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Zexious View Post
^My farriers have alway provided honest opinions as to whether or not a horse needed shoes. I think most would take a loyal and happy customer (because that means repeated business) than shoes on every horse, when it may not be the best choice.
Sort of reminds me of a young lady some time back who wanted her horse to be like mine. Unshod and able to ride anywhere.
Her farrier advised her that unshod her horse would be lame.
And true enough, when the shoes were removed the horse limped and was "lame". It's not something new or uncommon to see when a horse that's been shod for so long suddenly has it's foot expanding and more blood flowing it's uncomfortable and even painful. It can often take a year to get the feet right again. I've even spent over a year before getting feet completely back to where they should have been.

Of course her farrier told her that the problem was her horse needed shoes and that it wouldn't be lame anymore once it was shod again. Of course when the shoes went on the horses feet no longer worked like nature designed and intended, but it was use to that and didn't limp. So of course I was wrong and her farrier was correct . No problem. It doesn't cost me anything. She merrily went on her way convinced that her horse had to have shoes (and slightly constricted heels).

I really don't care if you shoe your horse or not. I was just putting out information for the OP so they could be a bit more educated on the subject and hopefully do more research to get the facts. If they feel that the horse needs shoes then no ones going to stop them .

No one will stop anyone from shoeing their horse, or feeing it sweet feed . There is no law against killing a horse with kindness. E.g No one will report you for cruelty for a shod horse with contracted heels or seedy toe, or a horse that's overweight and you're feeding it sweet feed (which will just keep it fat or fatter and lead to food issues). An emaciated horse can get you in trouble though. I guess that's the fortunate thing about a horse's weight. Most people can readily notice a horse that's too thin. But problems developing with the feet or getting overweight often just goes unnoticed. Look at Secretariat. Dead at 19...killed with kindness.

They're always going to be bigger and stronger so you better always be smarter. (One of my grandfather's many pearls of wisdom)
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post #24 of 90 Old 12-17-2013, 10:39 PM
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The fact of the matter is, what you want may not always be what your horse actually needs. For some time my horse couldn't go barefoot due to some factors. But now he is able to be without, and easily too.
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post #25 of 90 Old 12-17-2013, 10:42 PM
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Even endurance riders have started abandoning shoes (and they use to be some of the strongest supporters of having horses shod). This year Tevis Cup winner was unshod.

I've always had to wonder about seasonal shoeing. Gives you a few months for the hoof to react naturally or even get some conditioning done if you wanted, only to put the shoes back on and lose whatever you'd gained.

Oh well, not my problem. As I said. You can do what you want with your horse, just as I do what I want with mine. You'll just never have to worry about someone like me fixing any foot problems that might come up (or selling you any of my horses ). I'm funny about that

They're always going to be bigger and stronger so you better always be smarter. (One of my grandfather's many pearls of wisdom)
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post #26 of 90 Old 12-17-2013, 10:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
The fact of the matter is, what you want may not always be what your horse actually needs. For some time my horse couldn't go barefoot due to some factors. But now he is able to be without, and easily too.
There's never reason a horse must be shod. Even if you're making demands on the feet that they are not conditioned and prepared for you can put boots on them. In my case I just don't ride them under harder conditions until their feet are ready, BUT if the day ever comes that I want to do something before they're ready I'll buy boots to do it. Boots won't allow the conditioning for terrain, but neither to shoes. Boots do allow for normal foot reaction to keep the foot healthy while shoes do not.

They're always going to be bigger and stronger so you better always be smarter. (One of my grandfather's many pearls of wisdom)
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post #27 of 90 Old 12-17-2013, 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by its lbs not miles View Post
There's never reason a horse must be shod. Even if you're making demands on the feet that they are not conditioned and prepared for you can put boots on them. In my case I just don't ride them under harder conditions until their feet are ready, BUT if the day ever comes that I want to do something before they're ready I'll buy boots to do it. Boots won't allow the conditioning for terrain, but neither to shoes. Boots do allow for normal foot reaction to keep the foot healthy while shoes do not.
We tried boots, and it did not work out. So "never" is a bit too much of a blanket statement
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post #28 of 90 Old 12-17-2013, 10:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
. For some time my horse couldn't go barefoot due to some factors.
Would you mind telling us for what reason your horse couldn't go unshod?

I've yet to encounter a situation that a horses "needed" to be shod.

The best one I've heard (not here obviously ) was to treat a rotating coffin bone. It's a special shoe job. Doesn't always work and absolutely never "needs" to be done. Horses that were recommended to be put down, because the traditional shoeing treatment failed (and the coffin bone had penetrated the sole), have been fixed, fully recovered and saved "without" using shoes.

They're always going to be bigger and stronger so you better always be smarter. (One of my grandfather's many pearls of wisdom)
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post #29 of 90 Old 12-18-2013, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by its lbs not miles View Post
There's never reason a horse must be shod. Even if you're making demands on the feet that they are not conditioned and prepared for you can put boots on them. In my case I just don't ride them under harder conditions until their feet are ready, BUT if the day ever comes that I want to do something before they're ready I'll buy boots to do it. Boots won't allow the conditioning for terrain, but neither to shoes. Boots do allow for normal foot reaction to keep the foot healthy while shoes do not.
Competition horses, such as eventing horses and show jumping horses, that are running and jumping at speed on different terrains like grass or mud, need to be shod and have studs or caulks to prevent slipping and reduce the risk of a fall. Corrective shoeing is also a whole other category. Example, I've seen foals born with contracted tendons and trimming was not enough.
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post #30 of 90 Old 12-18-2013, 10:40 AM
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Its--I never suggested you cared whether or not a horse had shoes xD

I guess I'm just old school in that I feel you should be able to trust the professionals you hire (farriers, trainers, vets). Else, why hire them and not just learn to do it yourself?

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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