Strapping - Page 4
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Grooming

Strapping

This is a discussion on Strapping within the Horse Grooming forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Equine grooming strapping
  • Horse massage strapping

Like Tree53Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-07-2012, 11:23 AM
  #31
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms    
It probably makes more sense to think of it as horse massage - something that might feel good to a horse. Lots of humans enjoy a massage, but there isn't any evidence that it makes them stronger. If 30 minutes of continuous contractions doesn't build muscle in humans, then a few contractions after being 'strapped' isn't going to build muscles or strength in a horse. The horse would get more benefit from walking 50 feet than from strapping. But, as with humans, it might be OK as a massage technique.

No way it will ever happen with my horses. If they want a massage, they can roll in the corral...
Like I said above, it's for relaxtion, like you said a "massage". My horse enjoys strapping, he gets the "thats the spot" face. You are suposed to do it in a rhythm so they don't tense up. For muscle purposes, the best areas to help tone by strapping is the top muscles of the neck & the hind quarters.
I know people that do it on their dogs as well for relaxtion. I have heard people say it's cruel... sure, if your doing it improperly it could be cruel, just like any other method.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-07-2012, 09:35 PM
  #32
Weanling
Just a quick thought I wanted to throw in here. From what I understand, strapping is a method to tone and define muscles, not build strength. Those are two ENTIRELY different things. I think this is a very interesting idea, though I have no experience with it. Also, as long as you're not an idiot, I do not see how it would hurt your horse.
karliejaye and Foxhunter like this.
     
    12-07-2012, 09:43 PM
  #33
Foal
This concept is completely absurd to me. If you want to increase circulation, take your horse for a walk! Yes, that will tone muscles too.
     
    12-15-2012, 03:44 PM
  #34
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
It is supposed to be a means of stimulating circulation to the skin. Grooming with a rubber curry in a circular fashion on all the soft tissue does the same thing. So does the next step, brushing with a stiffer brush followed by a softer one. Two little girls groomed their pony as I had taught them and even tho it was on pasture 24/7 you should have seen the shine. They worked hard at this for 10 days and we heard numerous wonderful comments on the pony's coat.
I had a red sorrel mare and I groomed her with a rubber curry, stiff bristle, soft bristle and then finishing brush everyday. I always got comments on how shiny and red my mare looked, and her coat was always sooo soft.
     
    12-15-2012, 04:00 PM
  #35
Trained
LOL, it is not abuse or absurd when done properly and regularly, yes it is hard work, and was popular back in the day when people weren't scared of hard work, or probably that they were more scared of no work than they were of hard work.

Strapping a horse properly requires expert timing to get the twitching working properly, the knowledge to get the strength of the stroke right, and the fitness to put a deal of hard work in on the job.

I was brought up in stables where liveries where strapped everyday, and exercised, and fed a balanced diet built from the ground up, not ready made. All so they could be led out a couple of times a week for their owners to admire during the summer, and then for hunting through the winter. The grooms and horses were fit, the owners not so much

Don't rubbish something you don't understand, have never tried, and don't know the results of, yes it may be outdated but it worked.
     
    12-15-2012, 05:16 PM
  #36
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
...Don't rubbish something you don't understand, have never tried, and don't know the results of, yes it may be outdated but it worked.
I 'rubbish' it based on how twitching the muscle affects humans, per the FDA based on studies. There is a reason why human athletes don't use it.

But if it makes you happy, go ahead and do it.
     
    12-15-2012, 05:32 PM
  #37
Trained
You may or may not of noticed that humans and horses are different in a lot of ways, again, observation of actual long term results in horses probably trumps twitching muscles on humans, it's the whole apples and oranges again.

No one is asking you to try it, so why worry

More info

Making a hay wisp
From the middle of a hay bale, twist the stalks together until a two and a half meter rope is formed. You will find the hay easily forms into a rope if you dampen your hands and roll the hay between your wet palms. Keep the rope of even thickness as it forms (about 3cm is ideal). Once the rope is long enough, trim it along its length with scissors.
Make two equal loops of nearly equal size (See Figure 6.5). The loops should be about 15cm long. Wind the free end of the rope around the outside of first one loop and then the other. This forms a figure of eight around the two loops. Continue in this way until there is only a little free rope left. Twist the remaining rope into one of the loops securely.
The use and value of a wisp
Grasp the wisp with the whole hand and stand slightly back from the horse. "Bang" the wisp on one of the large muscle areas as shown in Figure 6.6. This will cause the horse to flinch the muscles against the bang. The muscles will be exercised this way.
When beginning to wisp a horse do not overdo it as it can make a horse stiff or nervous. Begin with three minutes on each side and gradually build up. Remember to wisp for an equal time on both sides of the body. You can wisp one area of muscles if they need building up, or all the major muscle seats. Alternatively, wisp all the major muscle seats, but give more time to areas that are weak or underdeveloped.
Wisping is valuable because
(a) it improves the circulation of the horse;
(b) it builds up hard muscle by massage;
(c) it makes the coat shine by squeezing oil from the sebaceous glands in the skin.
Strange likes this.
     
    12-15-2012, 10:54 PM
  #38
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
You may or may not of noticed that humans and horses are different in a lot of ways, again, observation of actual long term results in horses probably trumps twitching muscles on humans, it's the whole apples and oranges again.

No one is asking you to try it, so why worry...
You would need long term observation of TWO groups: those strapped, and those not strapped, with everything else held equal. Your observation is based on horses "strapped everyday, and exercised, and fed a balanced diet built from the ground up". To show strapping is effective, you would need to compare them to a group of horses that were cared for equally, "exercised, and fed a balanced diet built from the ground up", but who were in worse condition with strapping/not strapping as the only variable.

Human muscles and horse muscles and muscles of other mammals are not all that different. The twitching done with electrodes in humans would involve a much greater number of twitches done for longer periods of time. If not effective there when compared to exercise, then there isn't much realistic hope that strapping a horse to get 100 twitches a day will do anything that couldn't be done better by walking for a couple of minutes.

I'm not worried. However, there has been a lot of stupidity that stays around in the horse world forever, such as not allowing horses to drink after exercise, or not to cool them off with water, or the 20% rule for weight carrying by horses. It is completely reasonable to bring any studies available to bear.

As massage, strapping may work well. But the video claims it will build muscle, and there isn't any good reason to believe that, and a lot of info that would contradict it.
     
    12-16-2012, 02:42 AM
  #39
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms    
You would need long term observation of TWO groups: those strapped, and those not strapped, with everything else held equal. Your observation is based on horses "strapped everyday, and exercised, and fed a balanced diet built from the ground up". To show strapping is effective, you would need to compare them to a group of horses that were cared for equally, "exercised, and fed a balanced diet built from the ground up", but who were in worse condition with strapping/not strapping as the only variable.

Human muscles and horse muscles and muscles of other mammals are not all that different. The twitching done with electrodes in humans would involve a much greater number of twitches done for longer periods of time. If not effective there when compared to exercise, then there isn't much realistic hope that strapping a horse to get 100 twitches a day will do anything that couldn't be done better by walking for a couple of minutes.

I'm not worried. However, there has been a lot of stupidity that stays around in the horse world forever, such as not allowing horses to drink after exercise, or not to cool them off with water, or the 20% rule for weight carrying by horses. It is completely reasonable to bring any studies available to bear.

As massage, strapping may work well. But the video claims it will build muscle, and there isn't any good reason to believe that, and a lot of info that would contradict it.
Absolutely no good I comparing two horses on the same regime unless they are identical twins!

As for muscles - why is it that women after having a baby are told to contract and relax their vaginal muscles to tighten them up?

As for watering a horse after exercise - it depends on the exercise. A horse that has come in hot after hard work, is hot and sweaty as well as tired, like a horse that has been around a top event cross country or run a distance race, to give it a bucket of cold water is detrimental to its health. They are cooled somewhat before they are allowed to drink and the water is generally warmed.

As I said earlier, that woman couldn't groom her own hair let alone a horse!
Golden Horse likes this.
     
    12-16-2012, 08:12 AM
  #40
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
Absolutely no good I comparing two horses on the same regime unless they are identical twins!

That is why you would need a large sample size, and thus a very expensive experiment. And that is why you will never see an experiment like that with horses. They have been done with humans. But if you do strapping, and also exercise and good feed and regular care, then you can't say what strapping does or does not do because you have too many variables.

As for muscles - why is it that women after having a baby are told to contract and relax their vaginal muscles to tighten them up?

Because right after having a baby, that is about all some women can do. The FDA says "Stimulating muscles repeatedly with electricity may eventually result in muscles that are strengthened and toned to some extent but will not, based on currently available data, create a major change in your appearance without the addition of diet and regular exercise." It is better than nothing, but not as good as actual exercise.

As for watering a horse after exercise - it depends on the exercise. A horse that has come in hot after hard work, is hot and sweaty as well as tired, like a horse that has been around a top event cross country or run a distance race, to give it a bucket of cold water is detrimental to its health. They are cooled somewhat before they are allowed to drink and the water is generally warmed.

http://www.ivis.org/proceedings/aaep...chott/ivis.pdf

How much is too much water for a horse to drink after a long ride, and how long between letting him drink what he wants after a ride? - eXtension

01 Voluntary Water Drinking in Horses - VeterinaryPartner.com - a VIN company!

"Traditional advice has been to limit the intake of water immediately after exercise. This was because of the perceived risk of causing colic or laminitis. However, the researchers found that this fear was unfounded. Horses given free access to fluid immediately after exercise had no greater incidence of such problems. And in fact horses tended to limit the fluid intake to the size of the stomach (about 10 litres) On the other hand, restricting the amount of water in the first five minutes after exercise did not adversely affect the overall recovery from dehydration."


Cooling out a Hot Horse

As I said earlier, that woman couldn't groom her own hair let alone a horse!
My comments in bold. Then there is this:

Beer After Exercise May Be Better Than Water, Study Finds

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,...#ixzz2FDinGNcu

I refuse to try it with horses. Mia would probably insist on a premium beer....
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Strapping? Calling on the UK memebers here barefoothooves Horse Grooming 7 07-19-2008 04:13 PM
Strapping Horses?? What your opinion??? HorsesAreForever Horse Grooming 17 12-23-2007 11:17 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0