Transforming a coat...
 
 

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Transforming a coat...

This is a discussion on Transforming a coat... within the Horse Grooming forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horse health the difference between dull and shiny coats
  • How get more color naturally replensh old horse coat

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    10-24-2012, 12:39 AM
  #1
Foal
Transforming a coat...

Ok guys, don't laugh at me. I have my first horse again is years, but even when I was young and grew up with horses, I never knew the trick to making the difference in a coat like I will show in the photos below (and I stole a these photos from another forum member who owns the horse, if you see this sorry, but I just think you made her coat so beautiful in the photos after you got her). I know you can clip a horse to get a short/shiny coat, but I know not everyone with a sleek coat does a whole body clip, right? There has to be something I don't know. Photos below:

A before picture (and in the thread I read about this horse, he resuced her and she needed weight....)


After:


Is it blanketing? A grooming technique? A supplement?
     
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    10-24-2012, 12:48 AM
  #2
Yearling
The big difference between these two photos is that they are in different seasons. The first one is in winter, meaning the horse may have a thick and sometimes dull looking coat. The second is in summer, meaning the horse has a sleek and more vibrant coat.
Secondly, nourishing feed can make a huge difference.
Thirdly, brushing regularly keeps dirt off the horse (which can make the coat dull appearing) and distribute naturally occurring oils that seem to polish the coat.
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    10-24-2012, 12:57 AM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by AQHA13    
The big difference between these two photos is that they are in different seasons. The first one is in winter, meaning the horse may have a thick and sometimes dull looking coat. The second is in summer, meaning the horse has a sleek and more vibrant coat.
Secondly, nourishing feed can make a huge difference.
Thirdly, brushing regularly keeps dirt off the horse (which can make the coat dull appearing) and distribute naturally occurring oils that seem to polish the coat.
Ok cool, totally understandable. I saw my horse do this "sort of" do this change during the seasons, but I've seen often on either rescue sites or things like that, where the "before" photo is furry, and the after" is sleek and shiny. I brush every day, is there a nourishing feed anyone can recommend? She's on alfalfa 2x per day and Kings 20/20. She's beautiful, but she's more beautiful with that shiney coat she gets in the summer :)
     
    10-24-2012, 01:10 AM
  #4
Trained
A shiny coat only comes from a good diet. No amount of brushing and polishing sprays will make an unhealthy horse shiney.
A balanced diet and appropriate worming regime are the two most important factors. These will make all the difference in a horse's condition if they are lacking already.
Various suppliments can assist in 'finishing' a coat, but note that many of these suppliments will only work if the horse is deficient in something. Which goes back to a balanced diet - if it's balanced, you won't need a suppliment.

Then of course there's the care from the outside. The sun can bleach the coat, making it lighter, coarse and brittle. I keep my horses in light cotton sheets through summer on the high UV days to prevent burning and bleaching of the coat.
Avoiding washing regularly - shampoo's strip oils from the coat, making them fluffy. It takes a few days for the oils to recuperate. So you don't want to be washing more than once every few weeks absolute maximum.
Grooming is good, a regular going over with a curry comb can make a big difference, it lifts all of the dead skin and hair, and massages the skin and muscles, encouraging the production of natural oils.
I also use Hi-Shine hot oil treatments on my horses, after every full bath they get a hot oil treatment to replentish oils. After every ride, they get sprayed down with diluted Hi-Shine.

- By the way - the horses in the original post are not the same horse.
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    10-24-2012, 01:13 AM
  #5
Trained
Oh, and re clipping: clipping does not give a horse a shiney coat. If anything, it dulls the coat. If the coat is already unhealthy, the clipped coat won't be any better.
My gelding came to me in a full winter coat, having sat in a paddock for 12 months prior. As a result, his coat was very dry, brittle and a horrible light colour. He was clipped as soon as I got him, as he was starting to come into full work. Through winter he stayed pretty dull and foul looking despite great diet and worming. As soon as the coat started to shed in spring, he shedded into a gloriously shiney, red bay.
     
    10-24-2012, 01:17 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
A shiny coat only comes from a good diet. No amount of brushing and polishing sprays will make an unhealthy horse shiney.
A balanced diet and appropriate worming regime are the two most important factors. These will make all the difference in a horse's condition if they are lacking already.
Various suppliments can assist in 'finishing' a coat, but note that many of these suppliments will only work if the horse is deficient in something. Which goes back to a balanced diet - if it's balanced, you won't need a suppliment.

Then of course there's the care from the outside. The sun can bleach the coat, making it lighter, coarse and brittle. I keep my horses in light cotton sheets through summer on the high UV days to prevent burning and bleaching of the coat.
Avoiding washing regularly - shampoo's strip oils from the coat, making them fluffy. It takes a few days for the oils to recuperate. So you don't want to be washing more than once every few weeks absolute maximum.
Grooming is good, a regular going over with a curry comb can make a big difference, it lifts all of the dead skin and hair, and massages the skin and muscles, encouraging the production of natural oils.
I also use Hi-Shine hot oil treatments on my horses, after every full bath they get a hot oil treatment to replentish oils. After every ride, they get sprayed down with diluted Hi-Shine.

- By the way - the horses in the original post are not the same horse.
LOL, about the photos I posted...I either totally missed something, picked the wrong photos when I linked them here, or someone else posted the wrong photos of their horse(s)...sorry about that. I feel like an idiot now for not looking.

Thanks for the tips. Her coat seems healthy, and I don't know of any deficiency she has, or how I would know, because she seems very healthy and happy...but if something is lacking for her coat I wouldn't know how to assess it. So is it just an illusion that its actually longer hairs? Are they always the same, but sometimes they're laying down slick and healthy, and if it's winter or they're being bathed too much it's more "furry". I understand I sound like an idiot, but I appreciate the help. I know it's a dumb thing to be worrying about, but I see photos sometimes that make me wonder how to get her coat that way, so I thought I'd ask :)
     
    10-24-2012, 01:35 AM
  #7
Trained
Of course you're not an idiot for asking questions!

Well, in winter the coat isn't going to be as sleek and beautiful as a summer coat. But, a healthy coat should still be shiny in winter, particularly if the horse is rugged, as the hair will then lie flat rather than puff up, which can make it appear duller.
My rising 2 year old was lightly rugged through winter, and had a brilliantly shiny coat, despite it being a good inch long!
As for finding out if the horse is deficient in anything - a full blood run up is worth it's weight in gold. Gives a great starting point for forumlating a balanced diet.
     
    10-24-2012, 01:54 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
Of course you're not an idiot for asking questions!

Well, in winter the coat isn't going to be as sleek and beautiful as a summer coat. But, a healthy coat should still be shiny in winter, particularly if the horse is rugged, as the hair will then lie flat rather than puff up, which can make it appear duller.
My rising 2 year old was lightly rugged through winter, and had a brilliantly shiny coat, despite it being a good inch long!
As for finding out if the horse is deficient in anything - a full blood run up is worth it's weight in gold. Gives a great starting point for forumlating a balanced diet.
Thanks, I should really do that since she's new anyways. I did a basic vet check, but they just did teeth, legs, etc. I wouldn't say her coat isn't shiny, it just sticks way up all furry. I have photos from before I owned her where she is sleeeeek, so we should be able to make it happen. What do you mean by "rugged"? Also, she is 14, so she's no baby any more, I don't know if that makes a difference. Everything about her seems very healthy :)

Side question: Arent gray horses (if they change at all) more dapple in the summer and more flea bitten in the winter? I seem to have heard this somewhere, but she was flea bitten and is not getting more dapple-y....if that's a word, haha. No purpose for asking, just thought it was interesting.
     
    10-24-2012, 02:09 AM
  #9
Trained
Sorry, rugging is the Aussie term for 'blanketing' in the US ;)

Grey horses are so many different shades that you can't pin point what they will look like in each season.
The darker dappled greys will be a bit darker in summer, but each season they lighten up as they grey out.
Some will grey out to fleabitten grey, and they will stay fleabitten whether summer or winter.
Others will grey out to completely white, and they will stay white in summer and winter.
     
    10-24-2012, 02:20 AM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
Sorry, rugging is the Aussie term for 'blanketing' in the US ;)

Grey horses are so many different shades that you can't pin point what they will look like in each season.
The darker dappled greys will be a bit darker in summer, but each season they lighten up as they grey out.
Some will grey out to fleabitten grey, and they will stay fleabitten whether summer or winter.
Others will grey out to completely white, and they will stay white in summer and winter.
Haha!!! I thought you were saying rugged, like rug-ed, like a "rugged outdoorsman". LOL. I wondered if you were calling my horse a wimp because she isn't "rugged". Haha, you made me laugh. Yes, I am going to blanket her, it just hasn't gotten very cold in CA yet. Thanks for all your input!! :)
     

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