4 week old colt doesn't look like he is going to make it: seeking tips/advice - Page 3
 
 

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4 week old colt doesn't look like he is going to make it: seeking tips/advice

This is a discussion on 4 week old colt doesn't look like he is going to make it: seeking tips/advice within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Where is horse colt looking people
  • Looking after 4 week old foal

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    06-03-2012, 11:32 PM
  #21
Weanling
You say we are quick to judge, that is because we have seen SO much of this before. Naive people who get horses and can't afford them, and the horse suffers for it.

I'm glad your foal is alive and doing well, but 2nd the good advice that, if you can't afford a vet, you don't need a horse. I've seen it too many times.

We don't mean to be harsh or cruel, we are just realistic. And after years of experience with horses, we have seen this situation to much. Person buys horse, horse gets sick, oh no, I can't afford the vet, what should I do?
     
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    06-03-2012, 11:39 PM
  #22
Trained
Glad to hear that the foal is well.
If the mare was stressed and delivered the foal in such circumstances she may not have had or given the foal enough colustrum to build up his immunity. Or else she may have not gotten the proper round of shots to prevent illnesses and did not have any immunity to pass to the foal.
I understand the frustration some members have with the lack of prfessional care available to the foal.
However this is a new member who is asking for advice.
The OP could in the future use the knowledge of the members this forum has to prevent further problems.
Advice given without judgement is usually heeded better than that given in a judgemental manner.
Implying that the OP is not responsible will do the foal no good and only negate the good advice members have posted. Perhaps we need to remember the foal is the purpose of the thread.
To the OP good luck. This forum is full of sound advice and people that care about all horses. Your foal included. Shalom
     
    06-03-2012, 11:54 PM
  #23
Weanling
I think what it is with alot of us horse owners is we see so many coming on here with tradgic cases and never a mention of a vet or being told a vet wont come. And in most cases its people looking for attention.
Not saying that this is the case but in most cases that is what it is.
I cannot see how a vet refuses to go to a call unless its to a person who does not pay their bills. I cannot see how any good vet will diagnose a case over the phone. If vets could do that they would never leave home.
Im glad the foal is doing better. And Im sorry you got honest Not what you wanted to hear opinions. Im tired of the lets play the "Im going to lie to please anyone" game. Sorry JMHO

TRR
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    06-03-2012, 11:57 PM
  #24
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbarabians    
Glad to hear that the foal is well.
If the mare was stressed and delivered the foal in such circumstances she may not have had or given the foal enough colustrum to build up his immunity. Or else she may have not gotten the proper round of shots to prevent illnesses and did not have any immunity to pass to the foal.
I understand the frustration some members have with the lack of prfessional care available to the foal.
However this is a new member who is asking for advice.
The OP could in the future use the knowledge of the members this forum has to prevent further problems.
Advice given without judgement is usually heeded better than that given in a judgemental manner.
Implying that the OP is not responsible will do the foal no good and only negate the good advice members have posted. Perhaps we need to remember the foal is the purpose of the thread.
To the OP good luck. This forum is full of sound advice and people that care about all horses. Your foal included. Shalom
Wow. So the best we can do is sugar coat the issue and not tell the owner what she doesn't want to hear, that she needs the help of a professional, and then go research home remedies that probably are ineffective to help a foal who possibly is dying?

Telling the owner that she needs a vet and, if she cannot afford one, she doesn't need the horse, is realism. Not judgement. I have friends right now who were a little peeved at me but now grateful, because I told them they could not afford a "horsey" for their grandchild, no matter how she cried for one. Instead, they are letting her spend time with mine until the time they can afford one, vet and all.

Should I, instead, have let them plunge in? Well, I am plain-spoken and just call it like it is. Sorry.
     
    06-04-2012, 12:17 AM
  #25
Trained
I do not bite my own tongue and say what I please.
As a mental health professional I do understand that to get my point across I sometimes must frame my advice so the receiver will be more inclined to heed it. Everyone is not as emotionally secure to handle blunt advice .
Questioning the avaialbity of professional care or even the OPs ability to care for the animals does this foal no good.
It is not what was said that is the problem. Neither is the messenger.
My point is this the OP could use the knowledge of the members of this forum to improve the lives of the animals in their care.
Suggestions may have more power to improve the foals care than criticism.
Shalom
     
    06-04-2012, 12:24 AM
  #26
Weanling
Dbarabians, that is true and point taken. However, I suspect that someone who is not willing to face harsh truths on an on-line forum is not likely to be able to face them in real life situations. So I have my doubts whether this person would take any advice from anyone but those that agree with her anyway.
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    06-04-2012, 12:32 AM
  #27
Yearling
Like Sky says on here and I totally agree, "Don't make me shout, when in doubt get the vet out!" Although some posts did come off rude everyone is worried and many of us have not only in our horse-filled lives but also on here seen this happen. They vet should be called. Backyard remedies are helpful, but they're not the answer in a lot of cases. If your horse and colt happen to have an emergency they will need a vet! I don't think the poster that said if you don't have the money you shouldn't own a horse meant it in a rude way BUT it makes sense. Horses ARE expensive and they take a lot of blood, sweat and tears. Joy comes with it as well. I don't think anyone was trying to be rude just HONEST. It is a forum and you will have other people's advice. Again, sorry. JMHO.
     
    06-04-2012, 02:28 AM
  #28
Banned
I think the question of affording vet care is a real concern for many of us, I know that I worry about unknown costs like that, as I just don't have spare money hanging around for a colic surgery or alike. However there are some things that you should just expect to have a vet out for - I think foaling is one of them.

I don't think that's terribly harsh, or unkind.

To the OP, you will find that there are lots of opinions here, I believe that's actually why you originally posted as you wanted advise. Sometimes they will not fit with your own ideas, that doesn't make them wrong or a reason to leave.
     
    06-04-2012, 06:24 AM
  #29
Trained
Sorry if you thought we were rude, but the truth is hard to hear sometimes. The fact remains that you should NOT give antibiotics willy nilly and never ever give them in any way other than as the vet(or MD) prescribes. I would also caution you that your homeopathic remedies may not always have the same effect on an animal as a human. If you want to try them, fine, but be open and objective as to whether or not they are working. You always have to be prepared to get proper medical care, and you may have to start a fund for just such things. If there is a way to get hurt, horses will find it.

Good luck, glad your baby is better.
     
    06-04-2012, 07:02 AM
  #30
Yearling
Actually I thought this thread rather tame. As I was one of the first ones who posted I'll take for granted my post was rude. Ok. It still doesn't change the fact that a foal in any kind of distress is an emergency situation.

I was taught any baby emergency calls for the fastest, most professional, and knowledgeable opinion and treatment option you can get! I was sincere in the wish that it wasn't to late for the foal in question. I was sincere in my advice to seek veterinary treatment. I was sincere in my hope that you honestly did not want to lose the foal and would do what was needed to insure its health and well being.

If you take offense that easily with the answers/advice you were given then you are correct, public forums are not the place for you to seek medical advice about your animal.
     

Tags
colt, foal, trouble breathing, weak, wheezing

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