Advice for going barefoot....
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Advice for going barefoot....

This is a discussion on Advice for going barefoot.... within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • What i can use on my horses bare feet to help with non shoed transisiton
  • Can i boot my horse 24/7 after going barefoot

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-08-2010, 04:30 PM
  #1
Banned
Advice for going barefoot....

Well, my Pj Palomino was shoed in the front… through the left front shoe after two weeks… was re-shoed in both fronts and trimmed in the back… and now after two weeks he has thrown the right foot shoe.

I am so disappointed. My farrier spend an HOUR on that one foot. When Pj through the left front he ‘chipped’ so much hoof away that his hoof is a bit too short and of course tender and sore. Now he has done the same thing to the right foot… thus he is ouchy and miserable on both front feet.

NO cracks in the hoof though. I keep fileing the hoof round to prevent real damage.
I have trimmed my own barefoot horses before, but they all had nice hardy healthy feet. But, I filed Pj’s hoof so at least the chipped edges are rolled and clean.

Next Friday I am moving him to a new barn where he can be turned out in a soft- rock and mud free area or in the indoor with nice footing. I think I will just have the farrier their pull his other shoe and go barefoot. At least in the fluggy indoor footing he will be sound enough to lunge and ride. He is only ouchy on the rocks.

Its making me miserable. I am TRYING to do the right thing, I trust my farrier, but obviously it isn’t working. Another farrier wouldn't even touch him and told me Pj just has crappy feet, he won't keep a shoe on and good luck going barefoot .

He is on a hoof supplement and I use hoof oil every day or every other day depending… but I only have him 2 months and I know it takes MUCH MUCH longer than that…

So I have a few questions for the barehoof experts…

I have been to both KC La Pierre and Pete Ramey clinics and have done my horses in the past but this guys feet are horrible… so I have the whole concept and idea down. His feet just chip and break so easy! He was more sound with shoes. But, it’s clear to me that the shoes are just NOT going to work, and really as it stands now I don’t want to nail another shoe into his already non-existant hoof wall.

He cannot wear the boots during tunrout. They will wear the top of his hoof and make him even more uncomfortable to I would rather go without them.

If I get pictures of his feet tomorrow can someone give me some barefoot advice?
What hoof angles (for photos) would you like to see?

Also he has little fiber-ish things poking out of his feet… I can’t imagine this is good but my farrier didn’t say anything about them… what the heck are they and how bad is it that I can see them… a lot of them, like all around his hoof =(

He have little halter horse feet... like the kind prone to navicular...eventually. I was told the best way to prevent this is to go bare foot... I really don't know the truth to that.

Right now, he has very little hoof to work with... I think... but I'm sick of lost shoes, his hoof chipping away, and not riding. I wanted shoes on him becuase I thought that would be best... I can see that he cannot hold a shoe and I think becuase his feet are so small (and the typical halter horse) its in his best interest to forget about shoes and get him barefoot and hopefully this will help prevent navicular and make his feet healthy and happy... but I really have no idea if that's even possible .
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-09-2010, 03:18 AM
  #2
Yearling
Only kind of related but I feel your pain. My guy pulled three shoes in just as many weeks! He needs to keep the front shod though. What worked wonders is using no turn bell boots so that if he paws or oversteps it's not as likely he'll pull on the shoe.

Ballistic Overreach Boots - Horse.com

They are holding up really well and my horse is a bratty thing that likes to paw. The key is the "no turn" part which keeps them from rubbing your horse raw as the boot spins. My horse wears them 24/7 now, including turn out and although I check nearly daily for any signs of rubbing there are none!

I think barefoot is wonderful for the right horses! Maybe have a barefoot trimmer take a peak for a consultation? I'm sorry you aren't having much luck with your farrier. It seems to be the hardest horse professional to find and trust but they are the very very most important!!

I don't have any advice on going barefoot as I took my poorly trimmed horse and put shoes on him He's doing much better now that he is keeping them on though!

Also... not to detract from the barefoot thing but you might also look into glue on shoes? Good luck!!
     
    06-09-2010, 03:23 AM
  #3
Yearling
Also -- you might want to look into supplements for improving his hoof strength. My mom loves "Farrier's Formula Double," as an example, with her horses.

If the hooves are dry you can also try using a moisturizer like Rain Maker that helps maintain and restore moisture, texture and health Hoof Care Supplies for Horses: Rain Maker Hoof Moisturizer & Conditioner for horses

I'm by no means an expert but Rain Maker has made a huge impact on my guy (as have the no-turn bell boots) and I'm just passing along the advice I've received. ^^
     
    06-09-2010, 03:55 AM
  #4
Yearling
If you always wore work boots outdoors, on every surface, then decided to take your boots and socks off and walk barefoot on gravel, you'd make mincing little steps and it would be painful, right?

Now, lets say you spend time walking barefoot on grass, then sand, then smooth pebbles, and finally gravel? Over time, you'll get calloused feet, and you will barely feel the gravel.

Your horse is the same. When a horse is kept in shoes all the time, his feet get used to it. They no longer have to be tough, they have a layer of steel doing all the work.

I always wonder, when people have the fronts shod and leave the rears barefoot who they are fooling? Your horses feet are composed of the same stuff, front or back. A supplement doesn't just help back feet and leave crappy front ones. If your horse has great back feet and shod crappy front feet that your farrier just keeps shoeing, a supplement is not going to help.

If this were my horse I would pull his shoes off and turn him out for a few weeks. Sure, he's going to walk sore for a while. His feet are healing from having shoes. The sole is toughening up with every little bump and imperfection on the ground. When you have him trimmed up, make sure the frog is in good contact with the ground. Shoeing tends to lift the frog up off the ground, which is bad for the foot.

Let him mince around for a while. His feet WILL toughen up.
     
    06-09-2010, 05:32 AM
  #5
Foal
Have you investigated why he's pulling the shoes off in the first place? Is he working in deep ground which may have a suction effect on the shoes?

I agree that it's probably a good idea to put him on a hoof formula containing biotin. It'll take a good 9 to 12 months to grow out the weak horn and replace it with healthier stronger horn, but it's worth it.

In the meantime, consider glue-on shoes. And try to avoid both soft, deep ground, and hard ground.
     
    06-09-2010, 07:30 AM
  #6
Banned
OK, I am going to try to address everyone becuase I really need the help .

He is on "Horseshoer's Secret Pelleted Supplment" and I use the hoof conditioner "Horseshoer's Secret" also... so we have already been doing that, but I know it will take a while to see a difference.

The reason behind him looseing shoes, from what I can see, is that his hoof is week and brittle, and the nail holes must not hold and the shoe comes off. The farrier spent and hour trying to put a shoe on that would hold, but I think his hoof wall (what little he has of one) just can't hold the nails?

I think...

I understand that eventually being turned out he will no longer be ouchy.

I am afraid, however, that he will have no feet left by the time that happens! His back feet arent as bad, but are similair in that you don't have to trim them ever (just round them off) becuase they wear so fast and chip away.

He is not just ouchy becuase he is used to wearing shoes, he is ouchy becuase his feet broke down so much that they are to short and stubby now. I am afraid he will keep this up and do major damage.

Can feet litterally wear down to much to cuase an issue?

Becuase his feet are too short, his hoof wall is very thin and terrible, and I can only round his feet off so well becuase there is nothing there to file!?

And what are the little fiber things sticking out of his hoof?

I will get pictures later today!
     
    06-09-2010, 07:52 AM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by IllComeALopin    
Its making me miserable. I am TRYING to do the right thing, I trust my farrier, but obviously it isnít working. Another farrier wouldn't even touch him and told me Pj just has crappy feet, he won't keep a shoe on and good luck going barefoot .
You may want to consider having your farrier consult/work with your vet. There may be some underlaying medical issue (i.e. Something more specific than just saying crappy feet) going on.
     
    06-09-2010, 09:02 AM
  #8
Green Broke
I would stop the hoof oil (they really don't do much good) and buy him some boots for riding. I have easy boot Edge boots for my mare and they're very nice. I use the comfot pads in them now, as she has some separation that's cauing pain. The easyboot Bares are also good, but a bit harder to fit.

You can use "Durasole" to help toughen the bottoms of his feet. It's helped my mare some. Valley Vet carries it (and has good prices on Easyboots).

For a supplement, you might try Source Focus HF. I've seen great results with it, and I've tried a lot of other supplements. I get over 3/4" of growth every month.

Also, to be successfull barefoot, your horse needs the right diet and living environment. No grains or sweet feed, grass hay or mixed hay, if you use feed, only a "low starch" feed or a ration balancer or supplement that is feed at the rate of 1-2 lbs a day. He should have as much turnout as possible, preferrably 24/7. Healthy hooves need movement to grow. I only bring mine in to eat, then right back out.

Good luck!
     
    06-09-2010, 09:19 AM
  #9
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvs2ride1979    
Also, to be successfull barefoot, your horse needs the right diet and living environment. No grains or sweet feed, grass hay or mixed hay, if you use feed, only a "low starch" feed or a ration balancer or supplement that is feed at the rate of 1-2 lbs a day. He should have as much turnout as possible, preferrably 24/7. Healthy hooves need movement to grow. I only bring mine in to eat, then right back out.

Good luck!

So becuase I want him stalled at night and he cannot be turned out in a huge natrual-type enviroment He cannot go barefoot?

Guess I will be searching for a new farrier...

What if he gets 24/7 turnout and his feet chip away?
His feet are really brittle.. and AGAIN even though I roll them you can only roll them so much becuase there is nothing left to file. What do I do?
     
    06-09-2010, 09:50 AM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by IllComeALopin    
So becuase I want him stalled at night and he cannot be turned out in a huge natrual-type enviroment He cannot go barefoot?
Stalled horses can still go barefoot. In my opinion, though, the point is that for any horse, the more movement the better for circulation and foot health. In a 'natural' setting, horses can wind up walking upwards of 30 miles a day while grazing.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Barefoot trimming for already barefoot horses? Crimsonhorse01 Horse Health 6 12-07-2009 06:09 PM
What made those who are barefoot decide to go barefoot??? HalfPass Horse Health 14 06-22-2009 10:55 AM
How much can YOU do barefoot? Ne0n Zero Trail Riding 40 06-19-2009 09:08 PM
Considering barefoot... twogeldings Horse Health 6 04-20-2009 09:23 PM
Barefoot in MN? MN Tigerstripes Horse Health 6 03-18-2009 10:12 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0