Advice/input on lame horse, please!
 
 

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Advice/input on lame horse, please!

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    • 1 Post By loosie

     
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        08-24-2013, 03:02 AM
      #1
    Weanling
    Advice/input on lame horse, please!

    Hi everyone,

    Sam is lame in his right front leg. I don't really know anything about lameness, so I'm hoping you can help me figure out the possible causes, likely outcome and what to do. There's definitely something going on with his right front, and I have a vet coming Monday, but I'm a worried mom and would like to get your thoughts now :) Here's the info (bulleted because I don't know what's relevant and what relates to other pieces of information):
    • Sam had his feet trimmed Monday right after I rode him, and the farrier is trying to gradually correct a slight dish in his hooves and a high heel in his front right hoof. This is the second time that farrier has seen him
    • I tacked him up and went to mount on Tuesday evening, and he wouldn't let me get on. We "fought" about it for half an hour (me repositioning him or lunging him and trying again). By that time it was dark, so I had someone hold him while I mounted just so he didn't "win" and then got right off. I didn't think much about it because we worked through a mounting issue when I first got him and figured the fact that it was feeding time and he could hear his friends eating was inspiring extreme brattiness.
    • On Wednesday morning I lunged him and he kept tripping over a wet area in the outdoor ring and bucking when he tripped. I thought maybe he had something in his hoof, so I brought him in, checked his feet and took him into the arena (softer footing). He looked a little funny to me, so I had a trainer watch him move, and she said he was lame in his right front. She noticed this when he was tracking right.
    • I haven't ridden since Monday, and he had Thursday totally off (no lunging).
    • Today I started to lunge and saw he was off, but this time it didn't show going to the right but to the left. Another trainer helped me test him (she held up each foot for a few minutes and then had me trot him) and said she thought it was his knee — same leg.
    • Today, at the advice of my barn manager, I put mineral ice on his knee and gave him one crushed bute tablet in his dinner.
    • He doesn't show signs of pain when he's walking — just trotting. I've been grazing him in hand, and he doesn't seem to hesitate in stepping on rocky or sloped ground in the pursuit of tasty grass :-p

    So what I'm hoping you can speculate on is whether the pain could have something to do with the hoof being worked on (maybe changing the angle made him put different pressure on his knee?), whether you think it's more likely something more serious, and what you would do over the weekend until the vet comes (stall rest or is pasture ok? Bute? Should I walk him around at all?)?

    Thanks, you guys!!
         
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        08-24-2013, 03:34 AM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Fix a dish in the hoof? Meaning he doesn't want the foot concave? That's what a hoof is supposed to be like.

    All exercise should have stopped when you saw him lame, even lunging. Why exacerbate the issue?

    There could be calcification or arthritic changes in the knee. He may have sprained a tendon depending on how much the farrier brought the heel down at once. What will the vet be doing? I'd want some radiographs of his knees at the least. Hopefully it's nothing serious.
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        08-24-2013, 03:54 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayella    
    Fix a dish in the hoof? Meaning he doesn't want the foot concave? That's what a hoof is supposed to be like.

    All exercise should have stopped when you saw him lame, even lunging. Why exacerbate the issue?
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Thanks, Kayella. Sorry, I wasn't paying attention. The farrier is trying to correct the heel on that foot, not the dish. The front of his hooves aren't as straight as they apparently should be, but what the farrier is correcting is a too-high heel.

    And just to clarify, I wasn't lunging him while lame on purpose. I didn't realize it was a problem until Wednesday, and we (the trainer and I) thought he might be tender from the farrier. She suggested giving him two days to rest, which I did, and then I lunged him very briefly today to see if he was still affected and stopped as soon as I saw the issue was still there.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        08-24-2013, 05:28 AM
      #4
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SammysMom    
    So what I'm hoping you can speculate on is whether the pain could have something to do with the hoof being worked on (maybe changing the angle made him put different pressure on his knee?), whether you think it's more likely something more serious, and what you would do over the weekend until the vet comes (stall rest or is pasture ok? Bute? Should I walk him around at all?)?
    Since it sounds like your farrier was working on both the toe and heel areas of the foot, I would certainly make a sore foot my first guess unless you feel swelling in the fetlock or knee.
    Unless they're almost 3 legged lame, we don't bute. Slight discomfort will naturally keep them from being as active. If it were my horse, from what you describe, pasture ok, no work. If it gets worse, limit movement in a paddock or stall. If it is a sore foot, unless you have boots, you're probably looking at a week or two rest.
         
        08-24-2013, 01:37 PM
      #5
    Weanling
    Thanks, Paint HM! I will let him rest in the pasture and see what the vet says. I think I'll also not give him any more bute since the pain seems very minimal.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        08-27-2013, 06:32 AM
      #6
    Weanling
    I said basically the same thing in my thread asking about what to expect from the vet appointment, so I hope it's not against the rules to say it again here.

    I had the vet come out today. He did some imaging and determined that Sam has arthritis in his right pastern and some navicular damage above his hoof. He said it likely flared up now because of the farrier's corrections and the fact that he was sitting a long time before I got him.

    For now the vet said it's not bad and I should be able to ride him normally if I treat it. I'm supposed to give him supplements, avoid deep/soft footing, and let his heel grow back up and just have the farrier ignore the slight club foot.

    I'm hoping it doesn't get worse any time soon, but I can try injections and a suspension boot if it does.

    Vet said it has most likely shown up before, too. I really wish the seller hadn't kept it from me. I still would have bought Sammy -- he's the perfect horse for me -- but I at least could have had him on G&C this whole time and told the farrier so he'd have known not to mess with the angle on that hoof :/
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        08-27-2013, 07:23 AM
      #7
    Green Broke
    Sorry you are having to go through this-I'm on a horse hunt myself & these stories of what the seller hides are a bit scary.
         
        08-27-2013, 05:28 PM
      #8
    Trained
    Hi, yes, the farrier 'correcting' the high heel was my guess too. There are a range of reasons a horse may be 'clubby' and without further info and working in conjunction with a body worker at least, a farrier would be I'll advised to attempt to 'fix' it, especially in a mature animal.

    By correcting a 'dish' I am assuming a flared wall, which often goes with high heels. I would indeed want to correct that, but depends how it's done as to whether it may be problematic/helpful.

    You can learn more about hoofcare & also 'navicular' so that you have a better idea about what is needed & the sort of job your 'expert' of choice is doing, and what you can do to avoid /minimise any 'navicular' issues. Barehoofcare.com & barefoothorse.com are 2 good starting points.

    You can also post hoof pics here if you want opinions, as there are a few experienced people here, but as with anywhere, remember, we're just opinions, so best not to take any advice purely on blind faith - do your own homework too
    Posted via Mobile Device
    deserthorsewoman likes this.
         

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