All of this happened in 9 days - which is when we had our meeting and was last ridden - Page 2
   

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All of this happened in 9 days - which is when we had our meeting and was last ridden

This is a discussion on All of this happened in 9 days - which is when we had our meeting and was last ridden within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        07-08-2013, 11:00 PM
      #11
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KigerQueen    
    Founder is where the Lamina in the hoof inflame causing pain on the feet, and can progress into laminates (where the coffin bone sinks and rotates) causing extreme pain and can be fatal (EX coffin bone falling out of the bottom of the hoof). I would get a vet on this asap. Founder dose not cause weight loss and a weight change that quick with stiffness needs to be taken seriously.

    I have always thought it was the other way around;

    Laminitus is where the laminae become inflamed, and allowed to progress, it leads to the condition called "founder" , where the coffin bone rotates since it is not longer held firmly by the laminae (they loosen and literally die).
         
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        07-08-2013, 11:57 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    Tiny lily is 100% correct. Laminitus is the technical term for inflamed lamina. A horse with laminitus caught early enough can sometimes be recovered without the condition progressing to founder. Founder is a common term used for a symptom of advanced laminitus. It occurs when the inflamation from laminitus becomes so advanced the lamina actually loose blood supply and die off and release their velcro hold between the wall and coffin bone causing the coffin bone rotate away from the hoof wall. Basically

    Left unsupervised and in pain from serious laminitus for 9 days? Absolutely.....a horse could certainly become gaunted up looking and thin from pain, ulcers, dehydration from lack of movement to get water and.food, etc.etc. I've seen it happen even with supervision. Laminitus is a killer even with the best care. If you suspect it, you need a great knowledgeable vet and farrier on board asap. Google founder stance. Usually thr horse will not want to move however.


    Gaunted up in the flanks usually means dehydration and/or lack of sufficiant forage in the gut. Might be having trouble.eating or have to salt or something wrong with the water source? Id check. Stiffness could be a multitude of things. A vet visit might be a great idea.
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        07-09-2013, 08:24 AM
      #13
    Started
    Our boarder doesn't think it is that, but we are leaving out of town early this morning and the boarder is keeping an eye on him. When we get back we will be checking up on him. The boarder has put him and his pasture buddy in a smaller arena with the same amount of grass - so she can keep an eye on him better.
         
        07-09-2013, 11:55 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    Sounds like he's definitely hurting. Could you at least get him some Bute until you can have the vet out? Seems unfair to leave him in mysterious pain that is causing him not to eat/drink or to lose weight from stress. You could also check his digital pulse (or have your BM do it), which might help determine if it is laminitis.
         
        07-10-2013, 10:19 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    I thought from your description that it might be tetanus. He is vaccinated RIGHT? Has he been hurt (puncture wound.. seemed minor at the time and is healed) at all in the last 30 days? That you have noticed?

    A horse can be on the same feed for years and develop laminitis. A horse that is an easy keeper is the one most prone. They just reach a tipping point.. and there you have it. Grass can cause laminitis. Grass that has been fine for years but is suddenly lush due to rain can cause laiminitis.

    I hope this horse is OK since he is not really being looked after closely considering the circumstances.
         
        07-10-2013, 10:35 AM
      #16
    Started
    Your right lol had a blonde moment XD. I mix things up sometimes -_-' Curse you Dyslexia!!!

    To OP: give us an update as soon as you can, im really curious to see what is up with your poor guy.
         
        07-10-2013, 11:40 AM
      #17
    Yearling
    Does the person keeping an eye on your horse have vet authority in case your horse needs the vet while you are out of town? Do they have a good contact number for you?

    My recommendation is to get a vet out there ASAP rather than waiting. If he is foundering time is of the essence.
    KigerQueen likes this.
         
        07-12-2013, 06:39 PM
      #18
    Started
    Any updates?
         
        07-14-2013, 11:26 AM
      #19
    Started
    I'm sorry - we got held back with traveling.

    @elana: yes, he is vaccinated correctly. But there hasn't been any other issues with anything, no bruises, no cuts, no nothing.

    @tlking1: Yes our boarder has vet authority, our phone number to our cell phones and home phone, and she knows where we live in case there is a huge emergency.

    We are going out today to go ride - if he hasn't changed or one of his situations (the stiffness or weight) has not gotten better or it has gotten worse - I will make sure to post some photos and videos.
    Either way I am hoping to get a vet out here - my mom isn't too worried about it so I don't know what she is going to say. But if it hasn't changed I will be convincing her to call one. And I will be checking everything on that horse - even if it has nothing to do with the problem.
         
        07-14-2013, 05:46 PM
      #20
    Started
    I am back.
    Well Golley has improved quite a bit. His weight seems to have gotten just a tad bit better and his leg is hardly stiff at all now.
    I took some photographs of Golley's flanks - where his weight loss is most noticeable. As well as the bottom of his hooves for deserthorsewoman: I took photos of the front and both sides of his legs and his soles.

    Again, his legs have improved greatly - so I am no longer concerned about his legs. When we loped he felt like new again, no more "hopping" feeling.
    Right now I am worried about his weight - it hasn't gotten worse and it hasn't gotten better.
         

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