Any ideas for TB weight gain?
 
 

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Any ideas for TB weight gain?

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  • Tb, weight
  • How can i pick up weight if im having tb

 
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    10-02-2007, 05:27 PM
  #1
Foal
Any ideas for TB weight gain?

I got an ottb over the summer but im having a hard time keeping weight on him. He gets alot of food, are there any supplements or anything that will help him?
     
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    10-03-2007, 12:39 AM
  #2
Foal
I have an ottb too and am having the same issues....... He's 5.

I've been feeding senior feed, beet pulp, and sweet feed. Seems to be working well. Diet needs to be highly digestible....

I've also added wheat germ oil and my friend, she's a racehorse trainer, swears by Fat Cat. So I just started him on that too.

Plus, get some alfalfa or alfalfa/mix hay and feed a flake now and again......

Hope this helps a little.
     
    10-03-2007, 12:40 AM
  #3
Foal
Oh, and btw, Digger gets breakfast, lunch, and dinner..... But his lunch isn't such a hefty portion.
     
    10-03-2007, 03:25 AM
  #4
Started
Our guy's get pm6 grass hay (same proten content as alfafa) and n and d pellets (mare and foal), we took our horses off of sweet feed all to geather and started using this and it has turned our horses right around, it's one pound food per 100 of horse wieght split in to 2 feedings....great stuff
     
    10-03-2007, 08:11 AM
  #5
Weanling
What and how much are you feeding now? How much is your horse being worked? Is he on pasture 24/7 or given free choice hay? If you can let me know these things I will try to help.
     
    10-03-2007, 09:48 AM
  #6
Trained
Where are you located? If you are in australia or new zealand, there is a product called equilibrium mineral mix. If you can get your hands on this or a similar equivalent if your country has one, that should help. I have seen typically lean thoroughbreds fatten and round up nicely when being supplemented with equilibrium.

Feed 3 times a day with, as mentioned before, mid day feed somewhat smaller than the others. Also have hay or other roughage available 24/7.i can't recommend certain feeds as if you arent in australia, you will prob have no idea what im talkng about as I scratch my head at some of the things I hear people overseas say they feed their horses. Like beet and alfalfa and stuff. My produce barn has never heard of these things lol
     
    10-03-2007, 10:37 AM
  #7
Yearling
What exactly do you mean by alot of food? Anytime you have a weight issue the first thing you should do is really take a look at what you are feeding and assess whether it's actually what you should be feeding. The most likely situation with a horse that is not gaining weight is that you are not meeting his nutritional needs and supplementing may very well not be the answer.
     
    10-03-2007, 05:53 PM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryle
What exactly do you mean by alot of food? Anytime you have a weight issue the first thing you should do is really take a look at what you are feeding and assess whether it's actually what you should be feeding. The most likely situation with a horse that is not gaining weight is that you are not meeting his nutritional needs and supplementing may very well not be the answer.
if a horse isnt getting his nutritional needs, then how could a complete supplement to fix that not be the answer?? That is what supplements are for, this is of course assuming that the horse has been wormed and there are no other issues. I've known a few horses around who had the same problem until being supplemented and once they start, the improvements are dramatic including my own.

I hate to say it for fear of the backlash that may come my way but what you said goes against everything I have learnt in my life from many different in-the-know people including vets, trainers etc one of the first things I learnt about feeding was that supplementation that provides complete needs is the only way to go once the horse has been cleared of any other issues.

But anyways, supplementing has always helped me and I don't have skinny or unhealthy horses (apart from my mare who I've only had a few weeks and came to me very skinny and malnourished.) the only way to know our horses are getting exactly what they need is by looking at what they are feeding and the different ingredient contents and comparing that with the amounts of each thing he should be getting to remain healthy and therefore gain weight. If any areas are lacking, supplement.

Can you post what you feed him?
     
    10-03-2007, 10:11 PM
  #9
Foal
Ok so Bugs gets 3 scoops sweet feed in the morning and 4 scoops, plus nutra-flax and a joint supplement, new image from select the best and oil. He was at a good weight, but snice it hot colder he lost weight. I live in southern VA. He is out 24/7 but snice he has an over bite he can't graze on the short grass and doesnt really understand how to. I try to give him hay when ever I can in the feild, its just a regular grass hay.
     
    10-04-2007, 09:19 AM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by "jazzyrider
if a horse isnt getting his nutritional needs, then how could a complete supplement to fix that not be the answer?? That is what supplements are for, this is of course assuming that the horse has been wormed and there are no other issues. I've known a few horses around who had the same problem until being supplemented and once they start, the improvements are dramatic including my own.

I hate to say it for fear of the backlash that may come my way but what you said goes against everything I have learnt in my life from many different in-the-know people including vets, trainers etc one of the first things I learnt about feeding was that supplementation that provides complete needs is the only way to go once the horse has been cleared of any other issues.
Because supplements are not generally "complete" and supplements are not going to make up for a lack in the basics of a horses diet like an appropriate amount of forage. Supplements can help if the base diet is appropriate in it's amount/makeup but is deficient in specific nutrients. Now if you are talking about a supplemental complete feed, that is another story. But the granular or pelleted vitamin/mineral supplements aren't going to make up for a lack of adequate protein or fiber.


Bugabo,
From your comment about how much he gets fed I am assuming that he does not get hay everyday and gets very minimal grass from the pasture. This is the most likely source of your weight loss issue and needs to be corrected rather than just adding a supplement as forage should make up the vast majority of a horse's diet both to meet nutrient requirements but also because the fiber helps to keep the GI tract functioning normally. Horses need to recieve a minimum of 1.5% of their body weight in forage a day. If your horse cannot graze due to an overbite then he needs to be getting hay daily. No amount of sweet feed or supplement is going to make up for this lack of forage in his diet. However if you switch to a complete feed (which is designed to meet all nutritional needs including the fiber) then you can feed just that at the amount recommended on the bag, however all of the time spent without hay during the day increases the risk of gastric ulcers and colic.
     

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