Articles on riders weight effecting a horses soundness?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Articles on riders weight effecting a horses soundness?

This is a discussion on Articles on riders weight effecting a horses soundness? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Ratio of riders weight to horse
  • Heavy riders horses formula

Like Tree20Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    09-01-2011, 02:11 PM
  #1
Weanling
Articles on riders weight effecting a horses soundness?

I have an acquaintance who is a fairly large woman she rides a short morgan mare she rides her hard this horse has had fractured legs and some soundness issues I think she's to heavy for the mare and that she is stressing her horse to the max I want an article or something explaining rider weight versus horse size ratio
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    09-01-2011, 02:45 PM
  #2
Weanling
I don't have an article, but I have heard that you should be no more than 30% of the horse's weight, including tack and gear. However, the ability of the rider and the conformation of the horse can cause this percentage to alter. I wouldn't go over the 30% rule, but some horses may not even be able to carry that load.
     
    09-01-2011, 04:12 PM
  #3
Started
I had always heard it was 25% of the horses weight. A 1,000 pound horse under regular riding or a heavy work load should carry no more than 250 pounds of rider & tack. As said breed, built and conformation would play into this a great deal.

If the horse has had fractured legs and other soundness issues this is certainly a problem that needs to be addressed (light riding, not sound for riding, a lighter work load and lighter rider). This would not be the first heavy person that I have told to get a 4-wheeler.
     
    09-01-2011, 05:37 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by New_image    
I had always heard it was 25% of the horses weight. A 1,000 pound horse under regular riding or a heavy work load should carry no more than 250 pounds of rider & tack. As said breed, built and conformation would play into this a great deal.

If the horse has had fractured legs and other soundness issues this is certainly a problem that needs to be addressed (light riding, not sound for riding, a lighter work load and lighter rider). This would not be the first heavy person that I have told to get a 4-wheeler.
I imagine the mare is maybe 1000 lbs and she's well over 250 with out her tack I feel so bad for this horse. She sits heavy in the saddle too galloping hills and just riding her hard all day at least 4 days a week and hard for shorter periods the other days.
     
    09-01-2011, 07:02 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Horse may have soundness issues causing problems but no reason healthy horse with decent conditioning can't carry any human load. Shetland ponies routinely carried 400 lb loads in the British Army. I carried my body weight in rucksacks on two legs, I am sure a horse with four legs has no problem with 300 lbs.
     
    09-01-2011, 07:04 PM
  #6
Yearling
I've heard 20%, lol.... So that would mean the 1000 horse can only carry 200 lbs total. There was a formula I found online somewhere that gives you a formula to do using the measurements of the horse.


How does one determine the proper size horse for him/herself? Here is a formula with example:

Add up the total weight of the horse, rider, and tack. Our example: Horse + rider + tack= 1188 pounds
Measure the circumference of the cannon bone midway between the knee and fetlock. Our example: 7.5 inches
Divide the total weight by the circumference. Our example: 1188 / 7.5 = 158.4
Divide the result by two. Our example: 158.4 / 2 = 79.2
Values below 75 are great! Values from 75-80 are acceptable. Values over 80 indicate weaker legs and a need to train carefully, especially downhill. At this level a rider needs a horse with more substance.

* Reference: The Heavier Riders' Guide by Beverly Whittington and Rhonda Hart-Poe


I copied that off of What Size Horse Is Right For You? I found on google just now.
     
    09-02-2011, 04:58 AM
  #7
Trained
Yes, a heavy rider can damage a small horse, no matter how fit, I think. However, a light rider riding badly can too. A heavy rider riding badly... well better off on a clydie or such! Try looking up Dr Deb Bennett. She might have something on rider weight. Know I've read some studies & articles, just don't know where ATM, sorry.
Wheatermay likes this.
     
    09-06-2011, 06:13 AM
  #8
Started
Well I am going to throw a spanner to the works and expect to get a whipping.
What makes us think the horse was ment to carry any weight on its back.

I remember giving my kids a horse ride in my back on all fours, kid on back and no saddle to spread the load or soften those bum bones from digging in. Not the best example but I did not last long. Back began to hurt.

The horse was not designed with the object of carring us on its back.
     
    09-06-2011, 09:23 AM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan    
Well I am going to throw a spanner to the works and expect to get a whipping.
What makes us think the horse was ment to carry any weight on its back.

I remember giving my kids a horse ride in my back on all fours, kid on back and no saddle to spread the load or soften those bum bones from digging in. Not the best example but I did not last long. Back began to hurt.

The horse was not designed with the object of carring us on its back.
I completey disagree, the horse has specifically been designed to carry a load on his back, through thousands of years of selective breeding, Lots of people have tried to ride other critters, I am sure Grog and Nog climbed on others before they caught a horse, the horse worked out, the pig, rhino, and moose didnt. So taking that horse, Grog and Nog started a breeding program, till Abdul came along, and started getting really fancy, The horses that carried us good got to live and breed, the ones that didnt made great steaks,

The 20 and 30 percent rules actually have a basis in fact on quite a few studies by the US Army, The 20% rule was for a forever load, basically it was found a horse could carry a 20% load all day every day for years without any ill effect. 30% for short campaigns, but the horse would wear down after a couple weeks, The way most of us ride only a few hours at a time once or twice a week, the horse will most likely be fine with alot more.
The horse in the OP may have issues that would limit that though.
     
    09-06-2011, 05:10 PM
  #10
Started
I did say I was probibly going to get a whipping, I got caned. But the steak sounds good, beef that is. They still eat horse in France I have been told. For the life of me I can not look at my mare as food
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
dampness effecting new hoof growth? should i get a vet check? opinions pls AngieLee Hoof Care 5 05-31-2011 08:20 AM
Does dressage have an effect on soundness? SpiritJordanRivers Horse Training 7 01-01-2011 09:08 PM
Soundness issues back in the crosby again Horse Health 5 10-22-2009 07:25 PM
my back problems...could it be effecting my riding jazzyrider Horse Talk 1 07-27-2008 10:58 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0