Barefoot trims and critique pic heavy
   

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Barefoot trims and critique pic heavy

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  • Affordable barefoot trim for horses aiken
  • BAREFOOT TRIM PIC

 
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    11-25-2009, 08:41 PM
  #1
Weanling
Barefoot trims and critique pic heavy

I wanted to start a thread where everyone could post their barefoot trims, and ask for help. I figured if lots of people were doing a barefoot trim themselves they could post pics if they had questions and we could all learn together. If there are enough people doing barefoot trims it would make a nice resource to have a sub-forum for barefoot trims. Or maybe even just use this post and make it a sticky.
     
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    11-25-2009, 08:47 PM
  #2
Weanling
Left front

I used the trim from this page Barefoot for Soundness
I've ordered pete rameys dvd's under the horse. This is my first full trim myself.
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    11-25-2009, 08:51 PM
  #3
Weanling
Left Rear

I also wanted to say that I don't have the dvd's yet.
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    11-25-2009, 08:55 PM
  #4
Weanling
Right Front

Here's the right front.
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    11-25-2009, 09:04 PM
  #5
Weanling
Right Rear

After looking at all these pics I can see things a bit easier. When I lower the heels how low should I bring em? A couple rasp widths higher than the sole right where the heel is? I really didn't bring em down much on this trim. I just rasped all the hooves heels a little bit. Not much at all. I'll definitely feel more comfortable on the next trim after watching some dvd's over and again. I was also thinking of finding some cadaver hooves to practice with. "I hope people don't frown on that. But it would be good practice."
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    11-25-2009, 09:54 PM
  #6
Trained
I'm not sure I like this idea... Kind of scares me. There are just sooo many things to take into consideration and so many different points of view and sooo many different horses and feet and environments and feed and... you get the idea. There is a whole "sub-culture" just for trimming; a whole other language and a whole other education. I compare it to posting a "vet how-to" thread. Just too involved.

There are lots and lots of great barefoot sites on the internet. For people that seriously want to learn, there is a lot more reading, talking, clinics and hands on to do then what can be covered in this forum. I'd hate for someone to think they are getting qualified advice, run with it and end up with a lame horse.

I'm sure everyone's intentions would be good, but not everyone will proviso their comments with, "Keep in mind, I'm not a qualified practictioner..."
     
    11-25-2009, 10:30 PM
  #7
Trained
Argh! Just wrote an indepth reply & had it disappear into cyberspace! Very basically....

You'll get a heap out of Pete's DVDs and yes, I think visiting a knackery for some cadaver hooves is a great idea. Allows you to practice, experiment & compare without hurting anyone! If you can, get the knackery guys to use their saw to halve some of the hooves(**** hard to do by hand!), so you can see the coffin bone, hoof capsule, etc in profile.

It appears from the cracks, ridges, etc, that diet/nutrition are or were a prob. Safergrass.org is one site that springs to mind re feeding lami prone horses, and FeedXL.com is a fantastic(& very affordable) service/program that I personally subscribe to, which will help you analyse & work out correct nutrition for him. On that note, I'm not sure if they're functioning properly for other countries besides Australia yet(they're new) but if not, I'm sure there are other similar programs or services around.

The front half of his feet are excellent - the walls have been rolled/relieved right back to the damaged laminae which will allow them a chance to grow down strongly. You need to continue that back further to the rear of the quarters tho, instead of to where the overgrown bars & heels meet.

His bars need to come down to near sole level pretty desperately IMO. You're right that his heels are also too long too, but also right to take this gradually. Just lower them bit by bit & play it by ear. If at some point it makes him more sensitive on rough/hard ground on his weak heels, allow them to stay a tad longer than that until his digital cushions strengthen. Frog support pads or 'Sole Guard' or such would help in the meantime.

Lateral balance is hard to assess from these pix, but it does seem that the outsides of his rears at least are a little longer.

Sorry I no longer have time for more detail now.
     
    11-25-2009, 10:34 PM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
I'm not sure I like this idea... Kind of scares me. There are just sooo many things to take into consideration and so many different points of view and sooo many different horses and feet and environments and feed and... you get the idea. There is a whole "sub-culture" just for trimming; a whole other language and a whole other education. I compare it to posting a "vet how-to" thread. Just too involved.

There are lots and lots of great barefoot sites on the internet. For people that seriously want to learn, there is a lot more reading, talking, clinics and hands on to do then what can be covered in this forum. I'd hate for someone to think they are getting qualified advice, run with it and end up with a lame horse.

I'm sure everyone's intentions would be good, but not everyone will proviso their comments with, "Keep in mind, I'm not a qualified practictioner..."
Agree thoroughly with the above, and in my first indepth reply I elaborated on the idea of doing your own research, making your own decisions & not just taking anyone's words for it. So saying, given other posts & info on the situation, I'm confident in replying how I have for this situation. However, that definitely doesn't mean I'd advocate the same treatment for a different horse/situation either.
     
    11-26-2009, 08:22 AM
  #9
Trained
Sorry, Totalfreedom, I responded only to the first post you made and not your pics.

I also say that the bars are overgrown and heels are too long. Also, I would rasp down the sides of the heels -- still some flaring there.

If you can get cadaver hooves, go for it. The ones that I have seen / used have been in terrible shape and it is interesting to see how much can be done in one trim in really bad situation. Also, take pics of your trims to self-critique.

Even when doing your own horse, you have already seen how much of a difference pictures make. For some reason, it's easier to see some of the things in 2D after the fact. Plus you can draw all over it!
     
    11-26-2009, 01:39 PM
  #10
Weanling
I took the rasp out this morning before putting on his boots and lowered the heels and I also rolled the edge all the way to the heel. Not a whole lot. Just enough so that I can take it slow. I took the heel height on the fronts down a bit though cus they were very tall. The hinds were ok so I just lightly rasped em.

I'm kinda wishing I would of taken some pics of his hooves when I first brought him home. It's neat to see the trim going to work. His hooves were very flat and had overgrown bars all the way to the tip of the frog. All I did was after the farrier came out the first time, was two weeks later took out the rasp and kinda touched things up. Lowered the heels, rolled the edge. But I didn't take hardly anything off. I've never touched the sole or the bars. And it's neat to see those overgrown bars turn to flaky/chalky dead sole and just exfoliate off of the sole. Also the soles are beginning to become concave. At least on the fronts. The backs are still fairly flat.

I really like the idea of taking pictures. It's amazing how much it helps me to be able to look at the hooves in a picture. I think before my next trimming I'm going to take before pictures, "and I'll post em here", and then I can have a really good sense of what I need to do to each hoof. It'll help me have a plan of action and what to do. I really am amazed at the power of the pictures to help me see what's going on, I just keep coming back here to look at the pics.
     

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