Becoming too thin? - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Becoming too thin?

This is a discussion on Becoming too thin? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        07-07-2010, 01:34 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Actually at the barn were at they only are stalled if the weather is really bad or if sick or injured. So he isn't cooped in a stall. He isn't exercized any more than usual (probably less than before actually) so were thinking it may be the mares.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        07-09-2010, 10:49 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    These are some pictures of him. They aren't good but I had only my phone and I was running late for work so I had to quick snap some of him...
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg mail16.jpg (6.7 KB, 49 views)
    File Type: jpg mail18.jpg (7.1 KB, 50 views)
    File Type: jpg mail19.jpg (1.2 KB, 51 views)
         
        07-09-2010, 11:38 AM
      #13
    Banned
    Its hard to tell from the pictures but I don't think he is any real distress. My horse lost about 150# when we moved him because of mares. He loves the ladies and if he has a choice between grazing and chasing the girls, girls win every time. The good news with that is, he needed some weight off of him anyways! I would up his hay and see about putting him in a better pasture if the one he is in is lacking. Get him away from the girls if you can. Grains will help but only forage will actually put the weight on him. Good luck!
         
        07-09-2010, 07:36 PM
      #14
    Trained
    Yes, agree that the pics don't give too much away, but had to go look at the original post, cos got confused as to what the thread was about, cos he looks perfectly fine. Full, muscly forequarters, no ribs, round rump... If that is a good representation of him & he's lost a heap of weight, I'd say it's likely he needed it and you don't want to put it back on.

    If on the other hand the pics are very misleading, I agree with the above poster & others about upping his forage a bit, but I wouldn't be giving him grain. Too problematic.
         
        07-10-2010, 10:21 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    These are horrible cell phone pics but we did find out that he would pace. He is the only one of our horses that has a hard time with grazing and he will eat himself sick so we give him about 20 min. Of graze time a couple times a week. But when the barn owner puts the other horses out to graze, he would be left alone and would pace the fence, (there is evidence of this too because there is a big hole being dug by the gate). Which leads us to a new problem with pacing. I know pacing is stressful to a horse and not good so maybe we get him a buddy to stay with him while the others graze or maybe I ride him while the others get their graze time.
         
        07-11-2010, 12:33 AM
      #16
    Trained
    Poor boy. Sounds like a sorry life he's found himself in. Have you tried a grazing muzzle? Far preferable to leaving him locked up & separated, if it is found to be effective.
         
        07-12-2010, 02:37 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Poor boy. Sounds like a sorry life he's found himself in. Have you tried a grazing muzzle? Far preferable to leaving him locked up & separated, if it is found to be effective.
    a grazing muzzle sounds like a solution to me.
         
        07-12-2010, 02:39 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    A grazing muzzle might work.with the grazing muzzle, with it would he still be able to founder or colic with it?
         
        07-12-2010, 08:28 PM
      #19
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Starlet    
    a grazing muzzle might work.with the grazing muzzle, with it would he still be able to founder or colic with it?
    Yes, unfortunately, as laminitis(I gather that's what you mean by founder?) and colic have other causes besides too much rich grass. Depends what else he's getting fed too. But the point of them is to cut down and slow down intake, to avoid big 'spikes' of sugar and to also reduce the diet without causing the horse to go hungry. So for these reasons it should greatly reduce the risk of lami & colic.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Are they too thin? LoveStory10 Horse Health 22 04-14-2010 12:52 AM
    Too Thin HorseRider403 Horse Health 14 03-01-2010 06:52 PM
    Too Thin? Phantomcolt18 Horse Health 11 12-20-2009 09:59 PM
    Really thin TB MTcowgirl Horse Health 65 12-02-2009 06:41 PM
    Too thin? Lori1983 Horse Health 29 03-11-2009 08:43 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:46 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0