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The Big Debate Over: Alfalfa does it make your horse hyper? Love to hear your thought

This is a discussion on The Big Debate Over: Alfalfa does it make your horse hyper? Love to hear your thought within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Problems with feeding alfalfa to horses uk
  • Does alfalfa hay cause club foot?

 
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    01-08-2010, 10:56 AM
  #31
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
Alfalfa does kidney damage to older horses. I have seen, first hand, an older horse slowly die from his kidneys shutting down due to an excess of alfalfa hay and oats. He first foundered, and from there his quality of life deteriorated extremely quickly. Because of the "over-work" the kidneys were doing, foundered (and still was being fed a diet of alfalfa and oats)
Your statement could have also been "Alfalfa destroys horses's feet", and it would be equally out of place as you stated the horse was fed an excess to the point of founder. And based upon the same scientific mindset, you could also say "Omolene 200 causes damage to horse feet", and that could be the headline to a major newstory, and like a lot of newstory's you just put in small type or leave out the fact that you fed 25# per day to the horse, thus abusing the product.
Drinking a glass of wine per day will not probably damage your liver; drinking a case of milwalkie's best every night will damage your liver!


Quote:
Most older horses have some type of Insulin Resistance or Cushings. Because of this, no horse older than about 20 (in my opinion) should be fed any alfalfa.
Insulin resistance is a sugar issue. Many alfalfa hay samples will actually have low sugar results, not high sugar!
     
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    01-08-2010, 11:05 AM
  #32
Started
Quote:
Insulin resistance is a sugar issue. Many alfalfa hay samples will actually have low sugar results, not high sugar!
Ive alway thought it had alot of sugar, its really green and vibrant and smells very good. I always thought it was simmilar to grass. It has a different kind of sugar- fructose, where as grain type feeds usually have sucrose (molasses.) Most animals proces fructose easier because its more natural then alot of sucrose we see today. That's why fruit and veggies are easier on your body then processed sugars (and higher on the food pyramid.)
     
    01-08-2010, 11:08 AM
  #33
Green Broke
I agree with Production Acres.

Alfalfa does not do kidney damage when fed properly. If a horse already has a kidney issue, then sure, excess protein in ANY form can cause issues. However, that does not mean it will cause issues for a normal healthy horse, of any age.

Also, the combination of high levels of Alfalfa and Oats has shown to be not the best, considering the protein content of both, the digestible energy of alfalfa combined with the starch/sugar of the oats, and the Calcium:Phosphorous (CA:P) ratio of both. A senior horse with questionable health should definitely NOT have been on that diet.

~*~anebel~*~ your post should have been, ignorant owners who do not care about the health and well being of the horses cause kidney failure (and founder)... .
     
    01-08-2010, 11:18 AM
  #34
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillybunny11486    
Ive alway thought it had alot of sugar, its really green and vibrant and smells very good. I always thought it was simmilar to grass. It has a different kind of sugar- fructose, where as grain type feeds usually have sucrose (molasses.) Most animals proces fructose easier because its more natural then alot of sucrose we see today. That's why fruit and veggies are easier on your body then processed sugars (and higher on the food pyramid.)
Grass Hay has actually shown to have higher levels of sugar in many instances than alfalfa.

Good articles:
Sugar in grass and hay
Better grass and hay for horses with laminitis
     
    01-08-2010, 11:59 AM
  #35
Foal
I just read a study I found and I have to agree with Production Acres. It is finally good to find out for myself the answers and that my gut feeling was right. Balance is the key and K.I.S.S (keep it simple simon). I know that I look after and feed my horses exceptionally well , Buttons was an amazing first horse for my daughter and we were devastated to lose her, I did everythig I could for her, and for the 2 other horses I lost in the last 16 months, 1 to a stroke and 1 to lameness, I spent thousands of $$$$ and lost my georgeous paint... don't tell me Im ignoant. Thankyou Jubilee for your kind words.
     
    01-22-2010, 10:43 PM
  #36
Foal
I just read a report that AQHA has done a study on alfalfa and found that feeding it to horses, esp performance horses , it can help with stomach ulcers as it coats the stomach. Benefical to all horses. Read it on AQHA.
     
    01-27-2010, 03:07 PM
  #37
Foal
Ok I should know a thing or 2 about alfalfa
1.does not make ur horse hyper
2.is very beneficial for their coat
3.alfalfa is less in sugars than T/A
4.fed to many breeds with no sighns of hot headedness
5.fed to my horse and she's a tank weighing in at 1200lbs aka she's an halter mare.
     
    01-27-2010, 03:50 PM
  #38
Foal
Great, thanks for more good info.
     
    01-27-2010, 04:25 PM
  #39
Green Broke
I feed my horse alfalfa and it does seem to give her a bit of spunk. If you have an arab I would not feed alfalfa because they can be high strung/hot already because it's their nature.

I suppose it does depend on your horses level of energy...if you horse is already hyper I wouldn't.
I'm switching over to grass hay once spring comes around.
I am also giving vitamins to my horse and I think that helps her with having a bit of energy when asked to run.
     
    01-27-2010, 05:01 PM
  #40
Guest
Down in Andalusia in hot southern Spain - there is very little grass - except perhaps in the 2 -3 months of winter when the rains come. In the place of hay they feed alfalfa - it is all they can get. They thrive on it.
However almost all the horses are Andalusians or Arabs both breeds used to the climate and the vegetation and of course alfalfa.

In the UK I feed my Irish horse a mixture which contains Alfalfa - she can get hyped up quite easily but I suspect green, green, grass is the culprit rather than the mixture.

It is logical that a horse breed emanating from a hot climate region might seek out vegetation similar to that which its forbears had been fed upon as and when a horse of that breed was moved to a cold climate region.

That same horse might be especially vulnerable to weeds growing in a cold climate area ie yew and ragwort. But has any research work been done on this topic?

I deliberately did not buy an Andalusian from SPain for keeping in Britain because of the British climate and the lush green vegetation. I was told later by a breeder than Andalusians bred in Britain soon acclimatise - but do they?

Measuring hype in a horse is difficult. We quickly blame diet and with good cause - but are we right to do so. Some folks swear that rolled oats are heating feed - others say that in measured quanties oats are good. But when I fed my cob Joe oats he became uncontrollable.

I have a sneaking feeling that breed matters. But who knows?

B G
     

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