Blood work, plus new to this site!
   

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Blood work, plus new to this site!

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  • Corrected calcium for low albumin horse
  • What is alb on blood work

 
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    12-10-2008, 02:33 PM
  #1
Foal
Blood work, plus new to this site!

Hello everyone, I have been reading here for a couple days and have seen some very interesting and good advice given to some people. I have a few questions if you don't mind. I have posted on another forum and they have given good advice to.

First off my gelding was rescued at 2 1/2 mths old. He was in very bad shape. He is now 2 1/2 yrs old. Has been on good hay, free choice and a texas feed...One&Only, suppose to be a forage feed. Didn't give Vit/mins because of the rep told me it had all that my horses needed in it. This horse had lung worm, pnemonia and very under weight when I got him here. Since then he has grown out very nicely, by looking at him you wouldn't think a thing was wrong with him, only problem....he had fractured his jaw and surgery was done, he messed up the wire and messed up his teeth, but kept his weight...he has been having an ongoing abscessing in his front right hoof, so bad this past time, we thought founder, called vet out, she took xrays, coffen bone rotated a hair, abscess on top tip of coffen bone, but no founder, soft soles and very flat...changed farriers since then, he is doing much better then before. So we did the soaking again, with boot 21 on and 3 off.....the day the vet came out had blood work done...vet called back in 4 days and this is what they had found....

ALB = 3.5 G/DL LOW RANGE
ALKP< 10 U/L ON THE LINE LOW/NORMAL
ALT= 23U/L NORMAL
AMYL=19U/L HIGH SIDE
BUN= 22MG/DL ON THE LINE OF NORMAL/HIGH
Ca= 0.0 MG BOTTOMED OUT
CHOL= 100MG/DL NORMAL
CREA=2/0 MG/DL HIGH
GLOB=3.3 G/DL NORMAL
GLU= 86 MG/DL LOW NORMAL
PHOS=3.6 MG/DL LOW
TBIL= 1.3 MG/DL NORMAL
TP= 6.8 G/DL NORMAL

So we have changed his feed.....nutrena safechoice, 1 lb 2x daily of the one&only. 2.5 lbs 2 x daily, moormans vita/mins 1 oz daily, 3/4 cup farriers formula, 1 tbls salt, 2 sq. Coastle/bermuda 2 x daily, plus he gets 4 sqs spread out in the pasture daily, split between him and my filly. Both of my horses, both the same age have shot up in height, nice coats, but they had this before the change in feed, my gelding who has had the problems is actually running, bucking and just being a brat...I am loving every minutes.
Now this thing I have a question about is he is not eating as much hay as he used to, leaving a good bit, plus when I am mixing up his feed, it seem like alot! Then today, when I was cleaning stalls, I found he had left some of the min/vita in his bucket, this is something he hasn't done until today???? He drinks ALOT of water!
I don't have time to read over my post, but any advise would be great.
Sorry this is soooo long. Trying to get all information out there I can. Thanks for your help!
     
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    12-10-2008, 07:03 PM
  #2
Trained
Hi & Welcome
Quote:
...he has been having an ongoing abscessing in his front right hoof, so bad this past time, we thought founder, called vet out, she took xrays, coffen bone rotated a hair, abscess on top tip of coffen bone, but no founder, soft soles and very flat...changed farriers since then, he is doing much better then before.
I'm a hoof care practitioner, FYI. Coffin bone 'rotated' any degree away from the hoof capsule, &/or flat, thin soles says founder to me. Why did she think not? What did she call it?

There are a number of factors influencing soundness & hoof function. Diet & nutrition is a big one, as is *good* regular trimming. Exercise is another. The more the better. 24/7 turn out with company is a good start for this.

Feel free to send hoof pics for myself & other hoof 'boffins' to give more specific opinions on, if you like. Hoofrehab.com is one source of some great info on hoof care, function, rehab, etc.

Quote:
Now this thing I have a question about is he is not eating as much hay as he used to, leaving a good bit, plus when I am mixing up his feed, it seem like alot! Then today, when I was cleaning stalls, I found he had left some of the min/vita in his bucket, this is something he hasn't done until today???? He drinks ALOT of water!
Splitting feeds into as many meals per day is best. Feeds which are too big or too infrequent can pass thru the small intestines into the hind gut without being digested, and cause issues, including laminitis. While horses need lots of reasonably low grade roughage - ie hay - if they are having bulky hard feeds, this will reduce the amount of hay they eat.

Re leaving supps, it could be that he instinctively 'knows' he's had adequate of those minerals, or it could be that he just doesn't like them & has sifted them from the feed. If you think he does need them, wet down the feed a bit more and perhaps add *a little* molasses to make it more palatable.

I can't comment on the amounts & specifics of what you're feeding, because you really need a proper analysis to work it out. It also depends on the area the hay/pasture is grown as to what nutrients will be in it. I use KER(Kentucky Equine Research) Gold pellets as supplimentary to pasture & I have found their nutritionists are happy to provide nutritional advice by email.
     
    12-10-2008, 07:19 PM
  #3
Yearling
Could you please post the normal ranges listed for each chemistry/test?
     
    12-10-2008, 08:26 PM
  #4
Started
I don't know horse ranges but I would suggest putting normals here. What did the vet say? Was your horse dehydrated? Is he underweight? I'd guess from looking at these labs that his nutrition is poor. Protein looks low. The poorly healing wound would also indicate that nutrition is poor. How are his kidneys?

I'd do better with these if I knew norms and if these belonged to a human.
     
    12-10-2008, 10:56 PM
  #5
Foal
First thank you for all your responses.
Here is what the vet sent me.

ALB = 3.5 G/DL LOW RANGE 3.8-4.7 low range
ALKP< 10 U/L ON THE LINE LOW/NORMAL 10-469 low/normal
ALT= 23U/L NORMAL 5-30 normal
AMYL=19U/L HIGH SIDE 0-9 high
BUN= 22MG/DL ON THE LINE OF NORMAL/HIGH 11-22 normal/high
Ca= 0.0 MG BOTTOMED OUT 9.9-12.4 bottom out
CHOL= 100MG/DL NORMAL 53-113 normal
CREA=2/0 MG/DL HIGH 0.4-1.8 high
GLOB=3.3 G/DL NORMAL 2.4-4.0 normal
GLU= 86 MG/DL LOW NORMAL 58-167 normal
PHOS=3.6 MG/DL LOW 4.4-6.3 low
TBIL= 1.3 MG/DL NORMAL 0.0-2.5 normal
TP= 6.8 G/DL NORMAL 5.2-8.5 normal

This is all that is on the report. My husband and I did do some research to see what the abbrevation were and found that some of the pointed to kidneys....I did ask the vet and she didn't say much, thinking she wasn't really listening to me. She is always busy.

Hope to answer you questions, if I miss someone, please let me know. I really want him better. He has been doing great since the change in is diet, but I am now worried because he isn't eating very much hay.

Loosie- Why did she think not? What did she call it? She didn't, she just said abscess, soft sole, flat and rotated a hair....
I do have a new farrier he checked the xrays and did mention that she didn't mark the cornet band on the xrays, but after this man did his trim, Sammy ran off happly, for time ever to see that. He is trued out early in the morning and put up late in the evening, he runs after my filly almost all day long, I speard the hay out all over the pasture, pasture has different terrian in it that some we did ourselves. I have visited hoofrehab.com, many times and reading there has helped me to understand more then I did before, just wish I would have done it sooner, like when the abscessing started. He has been having abscessing since his fracture. He had been eating all his supplements, today is the first time he hasn't eatten them. I will divide up his feedings more. Right now our pasture isn't good at all. The terrain is good, but as for grasing it isn't, that is why I try and spread out the hay in many different places. Was going to get a round bale for them, but desided they would probably stay there and not move around...he isn't lame and hasn't been for 2 mths..knock on wood.
I will also look into the Kentucky Equine, we have done so much for him....like I said we just want him healthy and happy....I have noticed he isn't stocking up anymore, he is paying better attention when we are exercising him and isn't as nervous....
I hope I answered you questions, I only have pictures of his hooves when this last episode happened. If you would like those I can figure out how to post them here.
     
    12-10-2008, 11:25 PM
  #6
Started
Calcium levels should be corrected when protein levels are low.

Corrected Ca = measured Ca/0.6 + [total protein/8.5]

Corrected calcium =0/0.6 + (6.8/8.5)= 0.8

Glucose looks perfectly normal, not low at all.

I would ask the vet to explain your horse's nutritional status, cardiac, renal (kidneys), liver, and hydration status.
     
    12-11-2008, 11:06 AM
  #7
Yearling
First, I would remember that "normal ranges" are not normal for all horses. They are in fact an average of the results found on multiple "normal" horses. There will be variation based upon breed, age and even individual. I would not worry unless something is really out of range and then it would be a good idea to recheck the bloodwork in a week or so to assess whether the trend is for it to get worse or better.

The protein is not low on these results, so there should be no need to correct the calcium. But there are handling issues that could have affected the calcium and they are common in mobile equine practice and mailing out samples. Did you notice what color top was on the tube that your vet put the blood into?

Is your horse on a high fat diet?
     
    12-11-2008, 11:45 AM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshie    
Calcium levels should be corrected when protein levels are low.

Corrected Ca = measured Ca/0.6 + [total protein/8.5]

Corrected calcium =0/0.6 + (6.8/8.5)= 0.8

Glucose looks perfectly normal, not low at all.

I would ask the vet to explain your horse's nutritional status, cardiac, renal (kidneys), liver, and hydration status.
Should this not read that the calcium should be correct when the Phosphorus levels are low?????
     
    12-11-2008, 06:03 PM
  #9
Yearling
No, she's looking at the low Albumin which is what is used to correct calcium.
     
    12-11-2008, 06:30 PM
  #10
Started
Yep, I was looking at low albumin and didn't notice that the total protein was OK.

I would really suggest that you speak with your vet about your horse's nutrition is OK. It's really impossible for us to tell you what these results mean. We don't know your specific horse and breed. I'd want to know what the vet and a nutritionist say about these results. I'd want to ask about kidney function, hydration status, nutritional status, and liver function.

Does your horse look unhealthy? Fat? Skinny? Amount of muscle? Any muscle wasting?

People on computers cannot diagnose your horses problems.
     

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