Bringing Horses Home - The Horse Forum
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 10-29-2012, 09:07 PM Thread Starter
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Smile Bringing Horses Home

Hello. My name is Horselover. I own a horse, as does my Dad and we're moving. We have a house that we REALLY like and it has a barn so we're going to fix it up, and move our horses there. Do you have any advice for me that I could use. And before you say I shouldn't, I sit at home doing nothing so if we bring them home, I won't be inside all day and I'll be much more active! Do you have any advice that I could use. Do you also have any advice towards my horse trusting me and having a bond?
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post #2 of 7 Old 10-29-2012, 09:28 PM
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Welcome to the forum, Horselover3418! I can tell you from experience, there's nothing more wonderful than having your horse at home! When I got my 1st horse, she was boarded for only a few months @ a nice stable, and I could see/ride her every day. But I missed her every second in between, so we built a large shed and fenced a pasture....The main thing is to make sure you know what a huge commitment it is, and keep a note book handy with all of the information you need for your horse's care - Vet #, Hay Supplier, local farrier, etc. Check out a few good books @ the library about horsekeeping at home - "Horsekeeping On A Small Acreage" by Cherry Hill is the best!!!! Make sure to keep on top of the condition of the barn, any repairs that need doing, pasture fencing - make sure it's safe! What kind of climate are you in? If in the north like me, winter comes quick and hard, so not only to "batten down the hatches", but horses tend to drink less in the cold - a heated water trough/bucket is worth a million.... just a few little tips, and if one is prepared for the commitment, then I can definitely say, there's nothing more wonderful than having your horse at home! Good luck :)
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post #3 of 7 Old 10-30-2012, 01:02 AM
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Welcome! Agree with northern that having your horses at home is the best! Also that it's a big responsibility & maybe a big learning curve if you've never owned a horse or you've boarded somewhere where it is fully cared for without you.

They're big questions. So basically my answer is to get all the books you can, look into all the good websites you can & learn about horse keeping, feeding & digestion & nutrition, care & management, hoofcare, training.... I don't know where you're starting from or what specifics you need? Eg. How new are you to horses? Do you know they're herd animals that are happier & more confident living with other horses & outside 24/7? Do you know they need roughage nearly 24/7 & high starch feed such as grain is not generally very good for them?

How can you build trust & have a bond? Basically, spend lots of time just being with the horse, teach him in a non-confrontational way & only progress in training when the horse is confident & comfortable with 'easier' stuff - basically, prove to him it's all OK. Be consistent & timely with your reinforcement - eg. Instantly.

Last edited by loosie; 10-30-2012 at 01:08 AM.
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post #4 of 7 Old 10-30-2012, 02:51 PM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Oct 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Welcome! Agree with northern that having your horses at home is the best! Also that it's a big responsibility & maybe a big learning curve if you've never owned a horse or you've boarded somewhere where it is fully cared for without you.

They're big questions. So basically my answer is to get all the books you can, look into all the good websites you can & learn about horse keeping, feeding & digestion & nutrition, care & management, hoofcare, training.... I don't know where you're starting from or what specifics you need? Eg. How new are you to horses? Do you know they're herd animals that are happier & more confident living with other horses & outside 24/7? Do you know they need roughage nearly 24/7 & high starch feed such as grain is not generally very good for them?

How can you build trust & have a bond? Basically, spend lots of time just being with the horse, teach him in a non-confrontational way & only progress in training when the horse is confident & comfortable with 'easier' stuff - basically, prove to him it's all OK. Be consistent & timely with your reinforcement - eg. Instantly.
Thank you sooo much this helped. I'm ready for my horse, as I care for it everytime I see my horse which is 3 times a week. I keep wishing tht she was outside my house soif and when we bring her home I'll snap some photos of her and the farm and post them. Hopefully it'll work
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post #5 of 7 Old 10-30-2012, 02:52 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northernstar View Post
Welcome to the forum, Horselover3418! I can tell you from experience, there's nothing more wonderful than having your horse at home! When I got my 1st horse, she was boarded for only a few months @ a nice stable, and I could see/ride her every day. But I missed her every second in between, so we built a large shed and fenced a pasture....The main thing is to make sure you know what a huge commitment it is, and keep a note book handy with all of the information you need for your horse's care - Vet #, Hay Supplier, local farrier, etc. Check out a few good books @ the library about horsekeeping at home - "Horsekeeping On A Small Acreage" by Cherry Hill is the best!!!! Make sure to keep on top of the condition of the barn, any repairs that need doing, pasture fencing - make sure it's safe! What kind of climate are you in? If in the north like me, winter comes quick and hard, so not only to "batten down the hatches", but horses tend to drink less in the cold - a heated water trough/bucket is worth a million.... just a few little tips, and if one is prepared for the commitment, then I can definitely say, there's nothing more wonderful than having your horse at home! Good luck :)
Thanks, I'll definetley take it into account. If and when we moe and bring her home, I'll post some pics of her. Thanks for your help
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post #6 of 7 Old 10-30-2012, 04:49 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2012
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I agree with the above posters. Welcome.
Make yourself a list
I don`t know how much you already know

1. Get a scale ( a fish scale with work) as you would need to weigh your feed.
2. Horses need 1.5 to 2% of their body weight in feed per day, so if your horse is 1000 pounds he will need 15 pounds of food per day. Majority should be hay or grass
3. Have a plan of how your horse is going to be watered. Horses drink about 10 gallons per day.
4. Check the property, for any loose wire, garbage, boards with nails sticking out ect.
5. Read about signs of colic and abcesses. They are very common in horses and if you learn about it before hand you will spot it right away and know what to do.
6. When you bring your horses home, walk them around the property, so they see where the fences are, try to bring them home in the morning, so they have a full day to check everything out before it gets dark.

Can`t think of anything else right now
I`m sure you will love having them at home :) Have fun!
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post #7 of 7 Old 10-30-2012, 07:37 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotted View Post
I agree with the above posters. Welcome.
Make yourself a list
I don`t know how much you already know

1. Get a scale ( a fish scale with work) as you would need to weigh your feed.
2. Horses need 1.5 to 2% of their body weight in feed per day, so if your horse is 1000 pounds he will need 15 pounds of food per day. Majority should be hay or grass
3. Have a plan of how your horse is going to be watered. Horses drink about 10 gallons per day.
4. Check the property, for any loose wire, garbage, boards with nails sticking out ect.
5. Read about signs of colic and abcesses. They are very common in horses and if you learn about it before hand you will spot it right away and know what to do.
6. When you bring your horses home, walk them around the property, so they see where the fences are, try to bring them home in the morning, so they have a full day to check everything out before it gets dark.

Can`t think of anything else right now
I`m sure you will love having them at home :) Have fun!
Thanks I'llmake sure to mke a list and I'll definetley read and watch out thanks again!
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