Calming Remedies
   

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Calming Remedies

This is a discussion on Calming Remedies within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • What home remedy can i use to calm my horse
  • Magnesium for herd bound gelding

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    05-08-2013, 09:05 AM
  #1
Foal
Calming Remedies

Basically Im looking for something to take the edge off and possibly calm my gelding. He's become so herd bound within a couple weeks he's become dangerous to be around and work with. If you try to groom him he will freak out calling, pawing and even try to kick you. The farrier was out monday and as she was working on his front right, he picked up his back right and kicked towards her, just grazing past her hat. We didnt continue and he didnt get all feet done. He's fine after you start working with him. He will do everything on the lungeline you ask, pays attention under saddle (in the arena) and will follow you on the line at a w/t/c, stop, back up, turn etc. As soon as you stop working though he's back to freaking out.
He will be moving home which will solve these problems as he will only be with my other gelding but that's not for a month or two still. He still needs his feet done though. Its at a point where my trimmer will not work on him but I would really like to stay with her as she has done wonders on my other geldings hooves.
We were thinking of trying something to "chill" him out. What products have you guys used in the past that have worked. We don't want something that will sedate him but if it comes down to that, I have nothing to do but sedate him to be trimmed till he's moved home and less distracted=(
     
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    05-08-2013, 10:55 AM
  #2
Weanling
I have never used it but the reveiws I have read on it says that it works wonders, smartpak has a supplement called SmartCalm or something like that. You could maybe try that, if you have not already! Wish you luck! Sorry I can't be of more help.
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    05-08-2013, 11:06 AM
  #3
Foal
I can't get smartpak as Im in Canada =( Even if I could it would take too long to get it shipped up with the help of people
     
    05-08-2013, 11:06 AM
  #4
Weanling
I like brewers yeast but it does take time to work. Maybe giving him a really good full-sweat workout before the farrier comes? Changing the area where his feet are done (different scenery/stimulation)? Good luck, that sure is a dangerous habit. I hope it calms down after the move!
     
    05-08-2013, 11:26 AM
  #5
Super Moderator
1. Magnesium

2. If you didn't lace him a good one on that kicking leg with the riding crop or buggy whip, you should have.

I don't care what he is or isn't lacking in his herd bound brain, that kind of behavior needs to be stopped.

I don't blame the trimmer one bit for not wanting to work on him again. It's not her place to discipline him.

I know where I speak from because I have one horse out of four that has gotten more lacings in the 16 years I've owned him than my entire lifetime of Keeper horses put together. If I let one "well I DIDN'T hit you" kick go, the next time he will connect.

He is oat/corn/soy intolerant, and taking him off those things helped his attitude immensely.

But he has all indicators of becoming insulin resistant so I started him on Animed's "Remission". Was I ever suprised at the difference in his behavior.

He is #3 in the herd. He is so quiet these days, even the 27 yr old #2 horse has been allowing him to do the Itchy Thing. That has never happened in 16 years.

If you can't get Animed's "Remission", look into a solid magnesium product in Canada ---- and start disciplining him if you haven't already

I apologize for sounding ugly but the four things in this life my horses would think death looks good, is to get "it" for biting and kicking first and foremost. Bucking & rearing once I eliminate physical reasons or abuse if the horse is new.
     
    05-08-2013, 11:57 AM
  #6
Foal
The hard thing is I can't give him something he needs on a regular basis. They are out on 160 acres and he isnt even coming to the barn for dinner anymore, they are out happy with their grass. I wish I could get out there every night to give him it but it just can't happen.
I would have worked the snow out of him before she came but at this point he's not respectful even after he's worked, he goes back to freaking out and calling. I worked him for almost an hour after the visit, he was sweating everywhere and calm. As soon as we got back to the barn he was crazy all over again.
Walkinthewalk, Im not one to allow this behaviour at all, he does get a good smack after sent out to lunge on the line till calm and then brought back to try again. After the kick of course he got brought back up but not attempt at it again. I don't blame her at all either for not trying again as I wouldnt either and I didnt expect her to. I was fully understanding of the situation and we discussed looking into something to calm him. I emailed her after apologizing again and even said if she doesnt want to work with him at all till after he's moved I understand and would be willing to look at different options.
     
    05-08-2013, 12:23 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Sounds just like a magnesium deficiency. I use a product called MagRestore. But without making the effort to give it to him daily nothing will help you. For the first 10 days you actually have to give it to him twice per day. Depending how deficient he might need to stay on it twice a day just half of the loading dose.

Nothing, absolutely nothing, will help you if you can't get out there to feed him anything.

MagRestore
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    05-08-2013, 12:42 PM
  #8
Showing
You are looking for a quick fix. To get him calm enough for the farrier the vet would have to administer something. This horse is telling you that he knows what he can get away with and he'd doing it. Right now you are in over your head with this horse. You didn't nip his unwanted behaviour in the bud and now it has escalated to the point he is unpredictably dangerous. And until he learns respect I can promise you he will get worse. You need to hire someone to spend a few hours teaching you how to work with this horse. It's not about a trainer working with the horse, it has to be you doing hands on.
     
    05-08-2013, 12:49 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
You are looking for a quick fix. To get him calm enough for the farrier the vet would have to administer something. This horse is telling you that he knows what he can get away with and he'd doing it. Right now you are in over your head with this horse. You didn't nip his unwanted behaviour in the bud and now it has escalated to the point he is unpredictably dangerous. And until he learns respect I can promise you he will get worse. You need to hire someone to spend a few hours teaching you how to work with this horse. It's not about a trainer working with the horse, it has to be you doing hands on.
See the thing is, I have never aloud this behaviour. Its all happened in three weeks and I have been out there 5-6 times in those three weeks. Each time I try to discipline his rude behaviour when he's not being respectful or paying attention. Its not like Im sitting there letting him do this all and get away with it.
Its really sad for me as I have owned him since 2006 and never had an issue this bad with him. When I first got him we went through lots of training to work out little kinks. This is the same horse I used to ride tackless, crawl all over, could take him anywhere alone or with others etc. he's never once acted this way.
     
    05-08-2013, 12:52 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Please read about magnesium deficiency in horses. But you will have to put forth the effort to make sure he gets the supplement twice a day.
     

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