Can Cold Temperatures Affect Castration? - Page 4
 
 

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Can Cold Temperatures Affect Castration?

This is a discussion on Can Cold Temperatures Affect Castration? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
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    11-29-2012, 03:57 PM
  #31
Foal
We geld them at that age for a few VERY good reasons.

First of all, we would NEVER geld a weaner or even yearling. We like our colts to get a nice neck on them, and mature a bit before gelding them, it does make a difference in their appearance, and anyone with a good eye can see it. They look better, and we're a position to wait.

Secondly, We have some bloodlines we're pretty proud of, both in saddle horses and our bucking stock. One of the colts I speak of is a double-bred Dash For Cash, and Special Effort 3 yr old. We have lots of people interested in this colt. As for the other colts, since this is a horse riding forum, some people may not be familiar with bucking stock, but NFR level horses are quite valuable. We have a few out of a mare that sold for $125K last year at the NFR sale. These aren't carrot eating pets, they are top quality bucking stock, which is why we wait for the cream to rise to the top. Once we know what we've got as far as the colt's ability and value, we decide what to do with them.

Another reason, we had a 2 1/2 yr old that still hadn't dropped a nut.
     
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    11-29-2012, 04:00 PM
  #32
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
You apparently misread what NdAppy was saying.

The MAJORITY of people geld as soon as the 'boys' drop, which can be any time between 3 and 12 months
Gelding at 3 months? And someone said I'm asinine? LOL
     
    11-29-2012, 04:17 PM
  #33
Trained
Why not geld that young? If the testicles are there, and there is no need for them why not take them off? What physical/medical reasons other than appearance is there to keep the testicles any longer?
     
    11-29-2012, 04:22 PM
  #34
Showing
There's nothing wrong with the appearance of a horse gelded as soon as he drops, unless you're looking for the cresty stallion neck. Not everyone thinks that's attractive in a gelding. 'Looking better' is subjective, and completely open to interpretation.

You certainly are all high and mighty pontificating about what's best for a horse, but since the majority of people geld early, I'd say their opinions have as much merit as any of yours. Also, claiming to be better or having done more than most people on the BB won't get you anywhere, it just makes you look like an arrogant braggart.

Oh, and as far as doing anything based on the zodiac signs? You should be aware that the zodiac charts do not correspond to the night sky of today. Stars and planets are not fixed and move around quite a bit, so all those zodiac charts that people put so much stock in are grossly outdated. But everyone has their own little superstitions and beliefs, and while yours may be a little strange they're not terribly inconveniencing to your vet, which is why he/she goes along with them.
smrobs, NdAppy, Poseidon and 2 others like this.
     
    11-29-2012, 04:29 PM
  #35
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by NdAppy    
Why not geld that young? If the testicles are there, and there is no need for them why not take them off? What physical/medical reasons other than appearance is there to keep the testicles any longer?
I've given you the VERY good reasons why we wait. It's good to wait for the same reason you don't neuter a dog too early. Just because they've dropped doesn't mean they are mature. A colt doesn't complete his growth in the same way as he would, if he were allowed to reach sexual maturity. We have a 7 month old colt who has fully dropped, but he's not sexually mature, and there's no way we'd geld him now.

Also, it will definitely affect personality similarly to the way it affects a dog. If you want a dog that is somewhat puppy-like forever, then neuter him early. The horse WILL perform far better if permitted to mature further. They have better minds, focus and better appearance.
     
    11-29-2012, 04:47 PM
  #36
Foal
Speed racer, it seems the statements I've posted anger you. I really don't care to make friends, I'm only offering helpful advice when I have something to offer on a post, as it may help someone with their horse. Some people benefit from other people's experiences.

As for the appearance, I'm not talking about a thick, cresty neck. Anyone with a good eye can see the difference, and knows what I'm talking about in the difference between a gelding that was cut while immature, and it's not just the neck.

It seems the common sense reasons we wait to geld later anger you. I've posted some very good reasons that some owners of colts may not be aware of. Some people may not know gelding too soon affects their appearance. I'm not all high and mighty, but I think it's asinine to geld a 3 month old, or even 7 month old. I didn't claim to be better, I claimed we probably geld more than many people. You seem awfully angry at being presented with perfectly logical reasoning and common sense.

You obviously know nothing about the signs, or what I'm talking about. If you looked into it at all, you'd understand planetary movement is precisely why the dates change each month. Many people who raise a lot of livestock be it horses, cattle, etc. know about the signs. This even applies to planting crops. It's not superstition, my dear. God gave us the signs in the sky to know when to plant, and care for our God given livestock. Even the Bible mentions the signs in the sky, but I'm going to get into Scripture with you.

While I may be strange to you, I find you to be quite rude.
     
    11-29-2012, 06:01 PM
  #37
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6W Ranch    
I've given you the VERY good reasons why we wait. It's good to wait for the same reason you don't neuter a dog too early. Just because they've dropped doesn't mean they are mature. A colt doesn't complete his growth in the same way as he would, if he were allowed to reach sexual maturity. We have a 7 month old colt who has fully dropped, but he's not sexually mature, and there's no way we'd geld him now.

Also, it will definitely affect personality similarly to the way it affects a dog. If you want a dog that is somewhat puppy-like forever, then neuter him early. The horse WILL perform far better if permitted to mature further. They have better minds, focus and better appearance.
The underlined statement is completely false. It has been a long established fact that geldings will actually "complete their growth" to a greater extent than a stallion. This is because the growth plates get a message to stop growing when a colt reaches sexual maturity, thus actually stunting the horse's potential growth. Not only can this impact the eventual height of the horse, but if a colt reaches sexual maturity at an awkward growth stage, that can be retained as his "normal" conformation. Additionally, any muscle mass gained as a result of the extra testosterone in a colt's system will actually be lost slowly post gelding, so there is no benefit at all.
NdAppy, MsBHavin, Lexiie and 2 others like this.
     
    11-29-2012, 06:04 PM
  #38
Green Broke
So, the OP got her 7-month old colt gelded, seems to be fine & the vet only charged her $75-sounds good all around. Her board barn required the gelding be done. Stallions/intact colts aren't welcome everywhere. Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.
smrobs, Lwhisperer and NBEventer like this.
     
    11-29-2012, 06:06 PM
  #39
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cacowgirl    
So, the OP got her 7-month old colt gelded, seems to be fine & the vet only charged her $75-sounds good all around. Her board barn required the gelding be done. Stallions/intact colts aren't welcome everywhere. Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.
Exactry!!

Yay for good/not crazy vets that charge normal prices!!
smrobs, NdAppy, Chiilaa and 3 others like this.
     
    11-29-2012, 06:55 PM
  #40
Green Broke
And IMO, waiting to geld a horse until sexual maturity so the hormones can bulk them up is pointless and unnecessary. For example, I have a stallion and a gelding at my place right now that are full brothers, the gelding is twice as wide and has much more bulk and substance than his stallion brother. And they are 15 and 12, so obviously aren't going to be maturing any more, lol. If I put them side by side and asked you to guess which was which, with the obvious bits hidden from view, I'd bet money you would guess wrong.
     

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