Can Salt block be left out in weather, and few more questions
   

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Can Salt block be left out in weather, and few more questions

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  • Left salt outside
  • Can salt be left outside

 
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    07-18-2011, 10:58 PM
  #1
Weanling
Can Salt block be left out in weather, and few more questions

Just wanted to share a few things about today and buying some items. I bought the brown salt block and I'm wondering rather it can be rained on? I was thinking about putting it in the trough I was going to have in the stable yard. I saw my uncle have a nice trough thing he bought and says the horse doesnt waste any hay that way so I was going to put my hay in that trough as well when I hay him.

Bought a horse blanket for $39 bucks from tractor supply. It wasn't the color I really wanted but it was nice and thick and heavy. I still think I can possibly find one at a feed and tack place for maybe 15-30 bucks. It I believe is 2 ply thick and the cushion is about at least 2 inches thick. How thick is thick enough?

Ended up buying the Neutrena safe choice and also a bag of Sweet Mix, which was $9.99 for 50 lbs. Alot of people were coming in buying it and most said they mix it with their other feed while one or 2 said they just feed the sweet mix. Some said with just feeding the sweet mix, it didnt totally keep the weight they wanted on the horse but that it was overall a very good feed but works better when mixed with another or better brand. Also bought a large roll of hay for 50 bucks. The guy said he had rolls for 40 bucks but that they werent fresh cut as the other ones and werent as green so I went with the 50 dollar bale.

What other things will I need to make sure I have in my little tack area? When the flies are bad in the summer, whats best for the flies and will the repellents work for just hrs, days, or what?

How many of you guys administer wormer yourselves? What all do you administer yourselves and what are absolute must to have a vet do? And how often?
     
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    07-18-2011, 11:43 PM
  #2
Foal
Yes the block can be left out and you can just sit on the ground .

$50 for hay is crazy high , find a new hay guy .

Yes most people do worm their horses their self .

The TSC sweet mix , stay away , that feed is an all stock type and doesn't have what a horse needs , it is junk ...

A good fly spray is a musyt have , depends on the weather how often you need to apply . If hot and sweating alot or rainy it will need to be applied daily or every other day ( don't buy the BRONCO from TSC) buy a decent brand .
     
    07-19-2011, 01:20 AM
  #3
Trained
Hi,

Yes, salt licks can be left outside. Of course they will dissolve in water, but usually tend to last well enough in average rain. Don't know what your 'brown' salt lick is, but I'd ensure you get one specifically for horses, if it has other minerals in it and also avoid ones with grain &/or molasses in. I personally put out straight rock salt & provide their other minerals in a 'ration balancer' supp.

Re rugs, if the horse has access to shelter and has free movement - isn't cooped up in stall or pen - then they don't generally need a rug. Horses are actually evolved to be outside animals without rugs Heavy rugs can put too much pressure on skin deep muscles and cause atrophy, as can leaving a horse rugged for long periods. IMO if you're going to rug a horse, it should be as light as possible and should only be used on the coldest nights, out of season cold snaps, or after exercise on a cold day for eg, to allow the horse to cool/dry slowly. If you decide for some reason you want to rug your horse over the entire winter for eg, then a lighter rug is more important and you should budget for getting it off him for at least an hour a day and on any days that are warmer, so it doesn't become a 'sauna suit'!

Don't know about the Nutrena, but I'd avoid sweet feed, except as perhaps an occasional small treat - it's basically junk food for horses. Despite many traditional practices & ingredients, horses don't tend to do well on sweet, starchy feeds, so it's best to avoid grains & other high starch feeds. Your horse, if healthy & not in hard work, should be perfectly fine just on hay/pasture, plus whatever supp that is appropriate for his situation, to provide balanced nutrition. Feedxl.com is a great resource for dietary/nutritional info. Safergrass.org is a good resource for learning how diet(particularly starch/sugar) effects their health. If you are going to 'hard feed', it's important to feed little & often & avoid large &/or infrequent meals. Horses have evolved as 'trickle feeders' and need a tiny but constant amount of feed going through their digestive systems.

Re hay, if it's fresh & green it's likely got more nutrients in it, but green or brown, hay doesn't lose sugar content over time, and is also likely still deficient/imbalanced in many nutrients, so I personally tend to give precedence to low-NSC level hays(generally native, not 'improved') rather than colour. Of course, a nice fresh, green native hay would be best!

What else should you have in your tack area?? Where should I stop?? Disinfectant, manuka honey, bandages & other stuff for first aid & treating infections or wounds. A hoof rasp, and if you're going to have your horse shod, shoe pullers, for those emergencies where you need to pull the shoe pronto. A soaking boot, perhaps fly veil/mask, bucket & sponge, brushes.... oh and zinc cream or such for a horse with pink skin, to prevent sunburn.

Sounds like you have lots of research to do. In addition to links given, I'd get yourself some good horse-keeping books & look at some horse sites online which have info on management. Of course, as you'll read in my signature link post, you'll get many differing opinions on whatever subject, so it's just a case of educating yourself the best you can, learning all the pros & cons of various specifics and coming to your own decisions.

Oh, fly spray - I don't tend to bother with it much, except if I'm training or trimming a horse & the flies are distracting, but when I do I just use Tea Tree oil or Eucalyptus in water or such. Non toxic, non irritating. Doesn't last that long, but don't need it to. Spose it depends what the flies are like in your parts, too!
     
    07-19-2011, 08:56 AM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Hi,

Yes, salt licks can be left outside. Of course they will dissolve in water, but usually tend to last well enough in average rain. Don't know what your 'brown' salt lick is, but I'd ensure you get one specifically for horses, if it has other minerals in it and also avoid ones with grain &/or molasses in. I personally put out straight rock salt & provide their other minerals in a 'ration balancer' supp.

Re rugs, if the horse has access to shelter and has free movement - isn't cooped up in stall or pen - then they don't generally need a rug. Horses are actually evolved to be outside animals without rugs Heavy rugs can put too much pressure on skin deep muscles and cause atrophy, as can leaving a horse rugged for long periods. IMO if you're going to rug a horse, it should be as light as possible and should only be used on the coldest nights, out of season cold snaps, or after exercise on a cold day for eg, to allow the horse to cool/dry slowly. If you decide for some reason you want to rug your horse over the entire winter for eg, then a lighter rug is more important and you should budget for getting it off him for at least an hour a day and on any days that are warmer, so it doesn't become a 'sauna suit'!

Don't know about the Nutrena, but I'd avoid sweet feed, except as perhaps an occasional small treat - it's basically junk food for horses. Despite many traditional practices & ingredients, horses don't tend to do well on sweet, starchy feeds, so it's best to avoid grains & other high starch feeds. Your horse, if healthy & not in hard work, should be perfectly fine just on hay/pasture, plus whatever supp that is appropriate for his situation, to provide balanced nutrition. Feedxl.com is a great resource for dietary/nutritional info. Safergrass.org is a good resource for learning how diet(particularly starch/sugar) effects their health. If you are going to 'hard feed', it's important to feed little & often & avoid large &/or infrequent meals. Horses have evolved as 'trickle feeders' and need a tiny but constant amount of feed going through their digestive systems.

Re hay, if it's fresh & green it's likely got more nutrients in it, but green or brown, hay doesn't lose sugar content over time, and is also likely still deficient/imbalanced in many nutrients, so I personally tend to give precedence to low-NSC level hays(generally native, not 'improved') rather than colour. Of course, a nice fresh, green native hay would be best!

What else should you have in your tack area?? Where should I stop?? Disinfectant, manuka honey, bandages & other stuff for first aid & treating infections or wounds. A hoof rasp, and if you're going to have your horse shod, shoe pullers, for those emergencies where you need to pull the shoe pronto. A soaking boot, perhaps fly veil/mask, bucket & sponge, brushes.... oh and zinc cream or such for a horse with pink skin, to prevent sunburn.

Sounds like you have lots of research to do. In addition to links given, I'd get yourself some good horse-keeping books & look at some horse sites online which have info on management. Of course, as you'll read in my signature link post, you'll get many differing opinions on whatever subject, so it's just a case of educating yourself the best you can, learning all the pros & cons of various specifics and coming to your own decisions.

Oh, fly spray - I don't tend to bother with it much, except if I'm training or trimming a horse & the flies are distracting, but when I do I just use Tea Tree oil or Eucalyptus in water or such. Non toxic, non irritating. Doesn't last that long, but don't need it to. Spose it depends what the flies are like in your parts, too!
I should have been more specific. I was talking about the saddle blanket
     
    07-19-2011, 09:20 AM
  #5
Yearling
Safechoice is a great feed, but why the mix of sweet feed? Sweet feed is crap, IMO and safechoice is a good quality feed ,so there is no need to mix it. Hay, i'm assuming you got a big round bale, I don't know what those run, as I get 60 lb sqaure bales for around $15/bale.

And please ask what your horse was eating before. You can not just switch a horse to a new feed without doing it slowly. IE 1/3 or less of a scoop of the new stuff, mixed with his regular portioned original feed. Then a little more the next day and so forth until he's completely onto the new feed. This is not something to be taken lightly.

Saddle pads- craigslist, ebay, etc are cheapest.

For fly spray I use ultrashield or horse&pony spray, but I am not impressed with either. For fly control around the tack room- I use the (cant think of the name) a bag you fill with water and it attracts the flies so they fly in and can't get back out.

Its important to have first aid equipment- ointment for small scapes, bandages, and so forth. A fly mask if flies are bad, brushes, shampoos, conditioners, are all part of a well stocked tack room.

Please feel free to ask as many questions as possible, so we can help you along the way. You sound inexperienced, which is fine, but do you have someone experienced at home who is knowledgeable to help you along the way?
     
    07-19-2011, 09:37 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by LetAGrlShowU    
Hay, i'm assuming you got a big round bale, I don't know what those run, as I get 60 lb sqaure bales for around $15/bale.

Sorry, off topic but I'm shocked at how much hay costs for you. Those same size bales here are about $3, less in the Northern part of the State.

To the OP. Yes, get help from someone you know, someone who's horses look like you'd like yours to look.
     
    07-19-2011, 09:41 AM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by natisha    
Sorry, off topic but I'm shocked at how much hay costs for you. Those same size bales here are about $3, less in the Northern part of the State.

To the OP. Yes, get help from someone you know, someone who's horses look like you'd like yours to look.
What do you feed? I feed either orchard/alfalfa or timothy/alfalfa. Even fescue here runs $6.50 but I don't feed that.
     
    07-19-2011, 09:51 AM
  #8
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by LetAGrlShowU    
What do you feed? I feed either orchard/alfalfa or timothy/alfalfa. Even fescue here runs $6.50 but I don't feed that.
I feed alfalfa/timothy mix. Never first cutting.
     
    07-19-2011, 10:05 AM
  #9
Super Moderator
Hat can sure be high in some places. In the early eighties, I went to St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands to do a three day clinic and Pony Club testing. At that time they were paying 25.00 a bale for good hay. Of course, they had to ship it from the states.

Salt can be left out and it will erode a little from rain, but still last a good while. One thing I noticed in our area, the salt soaks into the ground and will become a "salt lick" for deer. They will dig and eat the dirt, if the block is gone. So, make sure you use the same spot and always keep a block there. Otherwise, you may end up with a PIT if you have lots of deer.
     
    07-19-2011, 10:12 AM
  #10
Weanling
Also, what about putting anything in the water to prevent bugs and different things from laying eggs in there? I know growing up some would put iodine or bleach in the dogs water to keep it fresh and clean.
     

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