Cold hosing is NOT always good for wounds!
 
 

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Cold hosing is NOT always good for wounds!

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  • Cold good for wounds?
  • Cold hosing wounds

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    02-07-2013, 12:04 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Exclamation Cold hosing is NOT always good for wounds!

This was completely new news to me, so I thought it was worthy of sharing.

My horse Red has been on stall rest for the past 3 weeks, due to an injury. I have a thread going about his progress here, if you want details: Need some healing prayers for my boy Red (some graphic photos -- beware!)

But I thought it was worthy to start a new thread about cold hosing.

I learned from my new vet that cold hosing is great for a fresh new wound. But you should never cold hose a wound once it starts to develop tissue to fill in the wound, because it stimulates the growth of proud flesh. This is also why you should try to avoid cleaning (unless you really need to) an older wound because even the stimulation of brushing or rubbing the wound to clean it can stimulate proud flesh.

This blows my mind because you always heard the old cowboy rule of: If you've got a wound, do cold hose therapy."

I trust my vet 120% as she is fresh out of school and specializes in equine lameness (and I knew her before she went to school, so I know her personally too). What she says is considered gold, in my mind. So if she says no cold hosing for Red, he isn't going to get it!

New thought to process though.

smrobs and Critter sitter like this.
     
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    02-07-2013, 12:05 PM
  #2
Started
That is interesting. I had no idea either!
     
    02-07-2013, 12:17 PM
  #3
Weanling
Yup I knew that........water can also drive bacteria into the wound and lead to an infection.

Super Nova
smrobs and Oldhorselady like this.
     
    02-07-2013, 12:23 PM
  #4
Trained
Our vet always said folks over treat wounds making them worse. His advice for wounds is wash it with soap, put some antibacterial on it (neosporin, swat, etc), and leave it alone.... "benign neglect".
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    02-07-2013, 12:29 PM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
Our vet always said folks over treat wounds making them worse. His advice for wounds is wash it with soap, put some antibacterial on it (neosporin, swat, etc), and leave it alone.... "benign neglect".
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Yup, that's what I do.
     
    02-07-2013, 12:33 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
Our vet always said folks over treat wounds making them worse. His advice for wounds is wash it with soap, put some antibacterial on it (neosporin, swat, etc), and leave it alone.... "benign neglect".
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In general, I totally agree. Nature has a great way of taking care of itself on the smaller stuff.

But my boy Red had his tendon exposed, and the joint capsule nearly exposed too. That had to be bandaged up and taken care of!
     
    02-07-2013, 12:36 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Well initially you want the cold water to decrease inflammation to the area! The cold constricts the vessels which doesn't allow the immune system to get in and make it as inflammed.

Once your wound starts healing you would actually want heat over the area to promote the immune system and blood to fill the area and promote healing.
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    02-07-2013, 12:37 PM
  #8
Started
Wow. I never knew that.
That'll be useful in the summer. We're always getting cuts and scrapes
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    02-07-2013, 12:41 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
Our vet always said folks over treat wounds making them worse. His advice for wounds is wash it with soap, put some antibacterial on it (neosporin, swat, etc), and leave it alone.... "benign neglect".
Posted via Mobile Device
I totally agree, I clean and throw SWAT or bacitracin on the wound. Now that I have lost a lot of my barn managing power to another girl (thanks school) I saw a lesson horse with gauze taped to his fur. I immediately ripped it off. It was a small bite mark! Literally just took the hair off and made a small area oozy area. I just don't get it!
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    02-07-2013, 02:49 PM
  #10
Showing
Yep. I was shocked when I came on here and started seeing all these threads about a horse getting a cut or something and I would see dozens of replies...all basically saying "cold hose for <so many minutes> every day". I've always been taught that you rinse it immediately after the injury to minimize swelling and rinse out debris, then you put some topical goo on it (we generally use a spray...can't remember for the life of me what it's called) and then leave it alone unless it starts to show signs of getting infected or something.

I suppose that may be why I've never had to deal with proud flesh.*shrug*
     

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