Colic rage. - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Colic rage.

This is a discussion on Colic rage. within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Will hot water beet pulp cause a horse to colic

Like Tree2Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    08-03-2012, 01:39 PM
  #11
Weanling
Muumi check this website out you will see what the vet means www.lucernefarms.com Its basically like a silage kind of thing.

TRR
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    08-03-2012, 01:56 PM
  #12
Trained
Based on what you've told us here, the first changes I'd make would be to give her soaked hay or beet pulp with salt in it. It will do 3 things. Soaking will make it softer for her and easier to digest, and salt will make her thirsty so she'll drink. Soaking will also add to her water consumption. Can you get beet pulp, either shreds or pellets, in SA?

Right now we're having uncharacteristically hot weather so I'm soaking beet pulp and salting it for all of my horses to make sure they drink enough water. This winter when it starts to really freeze, I'll do it too. If you can get a trough or bucket warmer to keep the water just above freezing, that will help too. I guess I should ask if it freezes where you are?

That would be my first inclination because it's the easiest and cheapest thing to change. Over here in America we have a long, ropey grass that has been known to cause impaction colics because it can be kind of tough for the horses to chew enough to break it down. I mainly saw that in California and Arizona, other grass hays are softer, so you might see what's available in your area. Chopping it up could help and again, soaking to soften it, might be an answer to having to buy haylage or chaff.

Grazing, after she recuperates from this round of colic, will probably be ok because most grazing grasses are kept fairly short by the horses.
     
    08-03-2012, 03:08 PM
  #13
Weanling
Thanks everyone for your kind and encouraging responses... I will definitely talk to my vet about everything mentioned.

Mls: that device is probably exactly what I will need. Hopefully I can find it here, or have it sourced, if its what I need. Sometimes I really envy the variety of products one can get in the US, although we can get most things here, every now and again one can get stuck.

TTR: thanks for the link, yes that is what I meant by saying 'chopped hay' not so eloquently. I know I can get it at the feed store, I have seen it there, but I will admit I am worried at the cost, although I am trying not to be. This poor little lady takes priority, so whatever she needs, I will get her, as long as I know what that is...

Dreamcatcher: you are so helpful as usual. I will talk to my vet about the soaked beet pulp. We do have that here, so its not a problem. Funny enough, at the hospital on Tuesday night, during the rectal exam, the vet was telling me about the grass in the US that often causes this type of colic... Bermuda grass I think it was? Apparently our local grasses are not so hectic as that, and should, in of itself, not cause an impaction such as this.

As to our winters, you guys will probably laugh at it. Its super mild, almost always in the teens (degrees celsius) during the day minimum, and not that often dipping past zero at night. Probably kind of a Californian winter, although I am not saying that from first hand experience, just guessing. We call it cold, but its mild enough that a lot of horses live out all winter just fine. Mine are blanketed and stabled at night, and up until now I have never had any problems. Sometimes we have ice in the early mornings in the outside troughs, but like I said, they are warm and stabled at night also. TBH, I would really doubt I can find water warmers, although I hope I can, because I really think I WANT them now. Like the hay chopper, maybe I can have it sourced if the local shops don't carry them.
     
    08-03-2012, 05:08 PM
  #14
Yearling
Howzit? I was sorry to read about your troubles. Could it be that cold weather has caused the filly to not drink as much water as usual? Here in the winter that can be a major problem as a horse not drinking can cause impaction colic. One trick to try is putting warm/hot water into the stall buckets at night, it takes longer to freeze that way.

I know bucket heaters may be difficult to locate where you live, but you can also look into insulating your stall water buckets as this webpage describes:

Preventing Horse Water in Buckets, Troughs, and Stock tanks from Freezing

I would also suggest you write down a list of questions to ask the vet when he calls, and so you can write down the answers as well. That way you do not have to worry about remembering what you wanted to ask him. Best of luck, keep us informed.
     
    08-03-2012, 05:43 PM
  #15
Showing
Chaff is from grains. If you can't get chopped hay put her hay is small mesh hay nets. These have become popular as a means of forcing a horse to nibble it's feed rather than grab a mouthful and stuff it down. If she's in a stall, fill two nets and tie in opposite corners, of if in a dry paddock. She'll walk back and forth. I stuff them until bulging then weave the tie string down thro the bottom and up the other side then tie it high. When empty it will hang down but not to the floor. Please provide loose salt, many like pickling salt as it's coarser than household but household is good to. Research has proven that horses will ingest as much as 3 x more than off a lick. Because a horse gets a sore tongue from the lick they don't get near enough salt.
     
    08-03-2012, 05:57 PM
  #16
Trained
[QUOTE=muumi;1629216]
Dreamcatcher: you are so helpful as usual. I will talk to my vet about the soaked beet pulp. We do have that here, so its not a problem. Funny enough, at the hospital on Tuesday night, during the rectal exam, the vet was telling me about the grass in the US that often causes this type of colic... Bermuda grass I think it was? Apparently our local grasses are not so hectic as that, and should, in of itself, not cause an impaction such as this.

As to our winters, you guys will probably laugh at it. Its super mild, almost always in the teens (degrees celsius) during the day minimum, and not that often dipping past zero at night. Probably kind of a Californian winter, .........QUOTE]

Bermuda grass is exactly what I was talking about, though there are different kinds. The ones I get here in OK are shorter and softer than the CA & AZ ones I got when I lived there.

Your vet should like beet pulp because it's very easy to digest and really helps with water intake. It's the main ingredient in a lot of Senior feeds because it's easy to chew and they can get the feed nutrients easily.

If you only get into the teens there, a tank or bucket heater might not do you much good. Mine don't kick on until it's below 0 C here and kick off at about 7-10 C, so might never get cold enough to even come on there. They do make a bucket/tank de-icer that you stick in and only leave it for a few minutes, it goes on, gets really hot really fast and then you pull it out again. I use that if I get a really frozen stock tank so that I can get a hole to toss the warmer down and defrost the rest of the tank without getting it too hot.

This is the quick heater:
Bucket Heater | Horse Health USA

And this is the one I put in and leave in once the cold weather hits:

3-IN-1 De-Icer 1500W 6FT Cord | Horse Health USA

Here's a couple other things you might find useful if you can get them:

Thermo Cube | Horse Health USA

I have a couple of these and I love them. I use these in my foaling stalls which are not in the main barn, so there's no tanks to drink from. They keep the water nice and tepid, not too cold, not too hot.

Heated Flatback Bucket | Horse Health USA

The buckets come on a little above freezing about 1.5 degrees and stay on til about 15 degrees.
     
    08-04-2012, 05:01 AM
  #17
Weanling
Thanks everyone for your responses, sorry for the delay in replying, but the time difference meant it was night time for me. I will get back with more detail later, for now, its 11am here, so I am off to visit my my girl in hospital.
I am very excited to see her and spend some time with her.
I will also get to talk to the attending vet in person, which I am looking forward to. You all have given me a lot to think about.

Till later!
PS. Dimsum: howzit bru! Lol
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    08-04-2012, 05:03 AM
  #18
Yearling
Crossing thumbs for you...
     
    08-04-2012, 03:11 PM
  #19
Started
Nothing new to add but after recently battling with ten days of impaction colic myself (((hugg))).

I agree, feed wet foods. Soaked beet pulp or cubes, salt didn't trick my older girl into drinking more but it was worth a shot. Be very conscious of her water intake from here on out, that is a big factor in the impaction colic reoccurring.

Good luck! She is just gorgeous.
     
    08-04-2012, 05:19 PM
  #20
Weanling
Bit of an update:

I went to visit my lil girl today at the clinic. She had an ileal impaction I learned but she is doing really well right now. I spoke to two different vets, and they both agreed that we should keep her on chopped hay for at least the next four months, and then re-introduce long stem hay and see how she does. It is clear that the weather changing rapidly from warm to cold, or even vice versa in winter has compounded whatever has brought on these impactions, so I am going to look out for trough warmers, and give loose salt to help encourage her to keep drinking. Grazing is encouraged, but of course, its winter here now, so the grazing is also pretty dry.

Anyway! But the plan is, that a few months of chopped hay may give her intestinal system some time to heal and recover from whatever damage or stress it was suffering. If this does not happen, she may have to be on chopped hay forever. But at this stage it still seems hopeful, that she may just need some time.

So my girl had actually lost a lot of weight the last few days, she was obviously kept off food until the obstruction passed, and is looking quite hungry and tucked up. Also, she is a fussy eater, so she is refusing everything except the pellets that I feed her at home... she turned her nose up at bran mashes and hay pellets, soaked or dry.

On a happy note, I could take her for a walk on the premises, and managed to take a few pictures to share:

It was so precious spending some time with her... she was the one taking me for a walk actually! Please just ignore her shaved IV patch and needle marks, they are pretty creepy.



Here she is looking at some horses across the way. I couldn't work out whether she was really interested in them as 'people', or simply envying their full hay racks :)





She is just so cute!



Back in her 'hospital room', she is saying 'howzit' to her across-the-hallway-neighbour, a chestnut mare with the biggest eyes I have ever seen.

So it seems she can come home on Monday, so I'm really looking forward to that. It been a rollercoaster, but hopefully we can move on from all this from now on.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Colic like symptoms Colic treatment is not working Cwulfing Horse Health 25 08-07-2012 12:26 AM
Could it be colic? or..? LoveeShowJumping Horse Health 1 01-01-2012 06:29 AM
Colic =/ Sarahandlola Horse Health 8 02-16-2011 04:12 PM
I Just... Mild Rage Inside Broski1984 Horse Talk 10 07-02-2010 04:57 AM
Me and My Rage! Truteno Member Journals 3 11-04-2009 12:34 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0