Colic? Ulcers? Or just stress?
 
 

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Colic? Ulcers? Or just stress?

This is a discussion on Colic? Ulcers? Or just stress? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
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    10-26-2012, 02:41 PM
  #1
Yearling
Colic? Ulcers? Or just stress?

I had been talking to Tori and Autumn(? Really bad with names sorry. :( ) last night on chat about this and I thought I would add some details now that I had gotten a chance to think about it a tad bit more.
So what has happened is...
I brought my Appaloosa home the other day (Wednesday) because the leasee wasnít feeding him, on top of other reasons but that being the most predominate one. Well yesterday I went to go ride because I was done with barn chores early and would love to enjoy my horse. I tied him like I would normally and he started getting antsy (Note 1), I got him to settle some and started brushing him and cleaning out his hooves in which he proceeded to keep trying to put them down (Note 2). I was able to get them all clean and began to put the saddle pad on and he started kicking toward his stomach. So my first thought was "well you probably needing your junk cleaned" and I stuck my hand up there and wow was it crusty and gross. I cleaned it out the best I could without water and he seemed to settle down even more and he let me know that he was done with that with lifting his leg at my hand (sounds like an oxymoron). I then went and got the saddle and put it on him and began to tighten the cinch and he was being girthy (Note 3). So I took everything off of him and took him for a walk instead and eat some of the old hay fields that are on the property, and gave him wet grain when we got back.
Note 1: This was a really big issue when I had first bought my horse, I since have corrected it and worked him through it. But the leasee let him eat grass when she was tacking him up and tied him to the side of a trampoline to keep him from wandering.
Note 2: I have NEVER had this problem, ever with this horse. I guess itís out to the lounge line I go with this new problem. He's not fond of his hooves being picked up but not in a disrespectful way.
Note 3: I have never had this problem either. I did check for pinching and other hang ups, and even undid and adjusted the saddle and tried again.
Other Notes: He can be a herd dependent horse, where the leasee was keeping him he was with 5-7 other geldings (didnít really know about this one) that had free range of about maybe 2 acres. And where he is at now he is by himself for now. He does have ribs showing so I am switching feed to something more balanced verses the Tractor Supply sweet feed he was on. He was a hard keeper when I first got him and I worked his diet to be away from that to a point where he would manage weight and not flux weight.
Well I was talking to one of my friends and she says itís just probably stress from not being with all of his old herd mates. He is having BMís and eating. I did go check on him this morning and he seemed a bit anxious but he was moving and not lying down.
What do you guys think? I'm headed to work and will answer any "rebuttal questions" you have when I get a break.
Any input would be great!
     
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    10-26-2012, 03:58 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
Quite honestly it sounds as if he got away with these things and is just trying it all on again. Continue as if nothing has happened. Correct him as you did originally and when he knows he cannot get away with it he will revert to the horse you once had.

I am not saying that he might not have an ulcer - if he was stressed then this could have brought it on but, a heck of a lot of horses do have ulcers and they get over them with no problem once they cease being stressed. Majority of ulcers are low grade.
     
    10-27-2012, 09:02 PM
  #3
Trained
Hi, I first would want to rule out ulcers or other physical problems, as it sounds like they may be contributing, if not the outright cause, but tend to agree with Foxhunter that it is probably as much to do with the handling/training he's been getting.... so don't blame him for it either!
     
    10-27-2012, 09:26 PM
  #4
Trained
A few thoughts...
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissColors    
Well yesterday I went to go ride because I was done with barn chores early and would love to enjoy my horse. I tied him like I would normally and he started getting antsy


How long have you had him back, how much time have you spent with him since he's been back, to re-establish routines & ensure he's confident in his surrounds?

Quote:
(Note 2). I was able to get them all clean and began to put the saddle pad on and he started kicking toward his stomach.


Who knows, could be due to ulcers, back pain, rough saddling & girthing....

Quote:
and gave him wet grain when we got back.
I wouldn't be feeding the horse grain, wet or otherwise, as there are generally healthier alternatives, but please don't feed this or other high starch/sugar feed if you think he may have ulcers especially. I believe this sort of diet, &/or too little roughage is the biggest reason for horses getting ulcers & other gut problems.

Quote:
out to the lounge line I go with this new problem.
I'd probably just address the problems rather than lunging him yet.
Quote:
And where he is at now he is by himself for now. He does have ribs showing so I am switching feed to something more balanced verses the Tractor Supply sweet feed he was on.
So being alone again, he is likely to be more anxious generally can you acquire any company for him to help him be more happy & secure? Yes, sweet feed, being high sugar & generally also high grain, is definitely a potential problem.

Quote:
to a point where he would manage weight and not flux weight.
So long as it's not to extreme levels, it's actually good for horses to 'flux' in their weigh, as you put it. Putting on more than ideal weight in 'good seasons' is OK, if there are regular 'bad seasons' to utilise the fat stores. It seems that a huge factor in horses developing IR & other metabolic issues is that many never get to use up those fat stores.

Quote:
He is having BMís and eating.
He's eating barn managers??!
     
    10-27-2012, 11:01 PM
  #5
Yearling
I mean flux as in being really skinny to being obese. In an unhealthy way I promise. I've moved him to a pellet type feed that should gradually put weight back on from the sweet feed they were feeding him, when he ever did get worked. . And his non training is another reason he came home. He had absolutely NO manners when I first bought him. To the point he was kicking people just because he could. And we worked out of that, he became a horse that not only everybody liked but wanted to ride. He went to the leader and he came back. Just as bad if not worse in some ways.
The lunging is how I train him and it works. We also do it for fun when not with corrective meanings. And I'm not someone who has their horse lunge for hours. I do correct him other ways but make the right things easy and the wrong thing hard.
But his problem I have assured myself on is that he wants to be out with the other horses. He jumped a fence, and took out the top line, and went across the street to hang with my bo's horses. Crazy! Either way he is just in quarantine for 30 days and shall have a pasture mate after that. The girthy ness I think he just worked himself up and was so anxious it was making him nauseous. Dunno. Either way. I am going to ride tomorrow unless this hurricane doesn't let me and I will see what happens after the ride. Lol or if there even is one. :P
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