Colicing Over and Over Again ...
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Colicing Over and Over Again ...

This is a discussion on Colicing Over and Over Again ... within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Should my horse be allowed turnout after he has had banamine
  • Quest plus gas colic

Like Tree11Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-03-2013, 07:34 PM
  #1
Yearling
Exclamation Colicing Over and Over Again ...

Hello HorseForum. I'm in some dire need of assistance here ...
So, unfortunatly, Cowboy has been colicing a lot lately :( Every time, I'm pretty sure it's gas colic, and all times are pretty minor. But it is colic nonetheless, and it is terrifying. I love my horses to death, and would give everything for their health.


So what happens is, it's usually in the afternoon, BEFORE he has his grain. He will start pawing and biting at his side. His side will swell up a bit (usually his left side) and he will try to roll. So I take him out, walk him, and give him some Banamine. If we don't have any Banamine, I give him Pepto Bismol. I also give him Antacids. He usually stops colicing all together about half an hour after that. He has gone through this 4 times now in a 4 month period. 3 in that first few months, and then once last night. The first time was due to a feed that upset him, the third time due to an ulcer, and the second likely a bit of both. This new time is so out of the blue, and nothing has changed. It was very sudden, and worried me.


Possible reasons? I just want to know why. I called the (ex) vet, she's the one who said Banamine and Antacids. She won't come out to the farm though, which is one of MANY reasons she is our ex-vet, if that's a word :p We are taking him to the Equine Hospital about an hour away from us as soon as we can get an appointment, but I'd like to know something in the meantime.


Thanks for reading the novel! :) Have a cookie!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-03-2013, 07:40 PM
  #2
Teen Forum Moderator
This is worst case scenario, but have you had him scoped for tumors? We recently had a gelding who was otherwise completely healthy until that point, start colicing very frequently (3 times in one week) and after one very severe colic, we scoped him and came to the realization that he had stomach cancer, full blown. He was PTS that evening.

Otherwise it could be a lot of things. Lining irritation, ulcers causing colic, just excess gas, not enoug movement... Giving him free access to a slow feeder of hay might help, because it will keep him digestive tract working continuously as it was meant to.
Cherie likes this.
     
    01-04-2013, 12:12 AM
  #3
Trained
Or infrequent 'meals' but are built for tiny near constant amounts going through their stomachs. Ntensive type traditional management n feeding does commonly cause colic, ulcers, acidosis, laminitis, etc. eeping horses cooped up is also bad for their system, as well as other probs, so keeping a horse turned out 24/7 with free access to grazing or hay is generally best. Anamine will only treat symptoms not problem but extra magnesium in the diet and a probiotic should help his system recover.hi, colic, esp gas colic is generally feed related. Horses don't cope very well with rich, starchy or sugar high carb diets, such as grain, sweet feed, etc(yes, despite what many feed co''s would have us believe!). Hey also don't do well with large
Posted via Mobile Device
Spotted likes this.
     
    01-04-2013, 12:14 AM
  #4
Trained
Hmpf! New computer somehow doesnt like this forum! Sorry formatting n lack of punctuation read above from middle - first bit not meant to be first!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-04-2013, 12:30 AM
  #5
Yearling
Unfortunately, it could be so many different things.
My guy started getting gas colic out of the blue as well. I was in a panic over it. Trainer gave him some Banamine and I got him moving in the turn out. My horse is stalled 24/7. And he does not have free access to hay. However, he's on a very strict schedule and is worked (in full training) every day. Vet came out and we kinda' talked it out. I mentioned the look and feel of his hay and how I felt it had changed from our last shipment. Vet said he thought it was the crappy hay. Sure enough, after that hay shipment was gone, and we'd gotten a new one, he was back to his old self. Haven't had a gas colic episode since. So I dunno... there's a lot of variables with our four legged fur children!
     
    01-04-2013, 07:41 AM
  #6
Green Broke
My 25 yo TWH has been with me since a coming 3 yo. He's never had so much as a tummy twinge until March, 2012.

Between March and October 3rd of 2012, he colicked nine times The regular vet tubed him the first time and stayed until ten that night. The emergency vet tubed him on Sunday afternoon (within a few weeks of the first colic).

Thankfully I am retired and can stay home full time. The other seven times I watched him like a hawk and was able to get Banamine in him as soon as he dropped<---which was literally like a lead balloon

He was diagnosed with Equine Metabolic Syndrome in 2007 for starters; that has been hard on his entire system.

The vet diagnosed this horse as having hind gut ulcers and possibly strangulating lipomas in the GI tract, further to the tumors that have been mentioned. To know for sure about the lipomas would require trucking this horse four hours to UT Knoxville and the vet did not want to do that.

Here's what has completely stopped him from colicking (nothing since October 3, 2012 as I knock on my head).

1. I changed his diet which was already grain-free. Get your horse off any sort of grain and soy products ASAP.

1.1 Giv him his feed pan stuff a minimum of three times daily; four would be better, if you can manage. These types of horses just cannot send too much food thru their digestive system at one time.

1.2 Even though he has metabolic issues, SO FAR, he is able to handle Tuttles Liquid 747 vit/min supplement. The carrier is molasses and I may have to change vitamins when Spring gets here, but for now it's working and the vet said to "go with it" for now.

It only takes one ounce daily.

1.3 Give him equine pelleted rice bran as the vit/min carrier. I know folks will say "beet pulp beet pulp beet pulp" but I should've saved the article that said beet pulp is not ideal under certain circumstances. Chronic/repeated colic and hind gut ulcers is one.

He doesn't need anything else but an ounce of a Liquid vitamin (NOT Red Cell) and some rice bran - essentially an Old People's diet.

But you could add some Omega-3 Horseshine if you'd like; NOT flax seed NOT BOSS, Omega-3 Horseshine. If he colics with it, take it away. My horse does great on 1/2 cup twice daily.

1.4 My horse is now a hard keeper and eventhough metabolic, can handle one pound daily of mushed up timothy/alfalfa cubes. He needs the protein and amino acids from the alfalfa.

1.5 Last and far from least, put your horse on Succeed if you can possibly afford it.

SUCCEED Digestive Conditioning Program Equine Supplement This stuff smells like cookie dough and my horse eats either in meal form or he will try and grab the tube out of my hand. Taste great and works - what a concept

I can't say enough about this expensive stuff ($90/month The vet was here for another horse December 18th. Free-of-charge, he re-examined all my horses because they're up there in years and all have an "issue".

The vet told me to keep my colicy horse on the Succeed because it seems to be doing its job. Also to keep feeding his feed pan stuff three times a day, even though it's only rice bran and some timothy/alfalfa cubes in the AM because he is now a hard keeper.

1.6 Plenty of quality grass hay and if hay is in short supply buy straight timothy pellets as a filler. You could measure out one dry pound and soak them a little bit to get more moisture into his gut. These horses need a lot of moisture in their digestive system. I wet everything that goes into the feed pan, each and every time.

Just feed one pound at a time as it seems my horse cannot handle much more than 1 - 1-1/2 pounds of something in his feed pan, at one time.

It's not as complex as it sounds - I am sorry I'm not good at explaining things.

The bottom line is feed him more often but little amounts, get him off anything grain and soy, lots of good hay, and Succeed, even it's only to get him thru the winter months.

Do not deworm this horse without doing fecals and let the vet recommend what to use. Naturally the horse I am talking about is my only horse that shed enough to need wormed. The vet told me to wait until our cold & fickle weather levels out to worm him and to use pure Ivermectin. Worming happens next week if the weatherman is correct.

I hope this helps and best of luck getting him squared away
amp23 and DraftXDressage like this.
     
    01-04-2013, 07:59 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Is he drinking enough WATER?
Is he eating hay off sandy ground? Is he grazing (or has been grazing) off sandy ground?

No more grain. Just hay. If he scarfs his hay like a pig, put it up high in a net. Offer warmed water as often as you can (warm water in winter can get them to drink more.. NOT HOT.. just luke warm). Put a tablespoon of molasses in the water to make it more attractive.

If he can be turned out in a paddock with a run in shed ALONE, do that and put his hay out in small piles so he has to keep moving (unless the ground is sandy or he bolts his hay.. then put it in a hay net hung high). Measure his water intake by measuring water INTO the bucket, then measuring what is left over and subtracting each time you refill.

Just random thoughts on this and that you do need a vet who will look deeper into the situation beyond a stethoscope on the tummy and a capillary refill time on the gum. BTW have you taken this horse's temperature?
     
    01-04-2013, 01:11 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Does your horse crib, by any chance? Mine does, and he's noticeably gassier when his collar has been left off or not adjusted correctly. I'm also fairly certain he had a mild gas colic once before I got the collar for him. (Some sources say that when horses crib the air only gets into the first few inches of the esophagus and then is expelled again, but my observations suggest otherwise...)
     
    01-04-2013, 01:19 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
My 25 yo TWH has been with me since a coming 3 yo. He's never had so much as a tummy twinge until March, 2012.

Between March and October 3rd of 2012, he colicked nine times The regular vet tubed him the first time and stayed until ten that night. The emergency vet tubed him on Sunday afternoon (within a few weeks of the first colic).

Thankfully I am retired and can stay home full time. The other seven times I watched him like a hawk and was able to get Banamine in him as soon as he dropped<---which was literally like a lead balloon

He was diagnosed with Equine Metabolic Syndrome in 2007 for starters; that has been hard on his entire system.

The vet diagnosed this horse as having hind gut ulcers and possibly strangulating lipomas in the GI tract, further to the tumors that have been mentioned. To know for sure about the lipomas would require trucking this horse four hours to UT Knoxville and the vet did not want to do that.

Here's what has completely stopped him from colicking (nothing since October 3, 2012 as I knock on my head).

1. I changed his diet which was already grain-free. Get your horse off any sort of grain and soy products ASAP.

1.1 Giv him his feed pan stuff a minimum of three times daily; four would be better, if you can manage. These types of horses just cannot send too much food thru their digestive system at one time.

1.2 Even though he has metabolic issues, SO FAR, he is able to handle Tuttles Liquid 747 vit/min supplement. The carrier is molasses and I may have to change vitamins when Spring gets here, but for now it's working and the vet said to "go with it" for now.

It only takes one ounce daily.

1.3 Give him equine pelleted rice bran as the vit/min carrier. I know folks will say "beet pulp beet pulp beet pulp" but I should've saved the article that said beet pulp is not ideal under certain circumstances. Chronic/repeated colic and hind gut ulcers is one.

He doesn't need anything else but an ounce of a Liquid vitamin (NOT Red Cell) and some rice bran - essentially an Old People's diet.

But you could add some Omega-3 Horseshine if you'd like; NOT flax seed NOT BOSS, Omega-3 Horseshine. If he colics with it, take it away. My horse does great on 1/2 cup twice daily.

1.4 My horse is now a hard keeper and eventhough metabolic, can handle one pound daily of mushed up timothy/alfalfa cubes. He needs the protein and amino acids from the alfalfa.

1.5 Last and far from least, put your horse on Succeed if you can possibly afford it.

SUCCEED Digestive Conditioning Program Equine Supplement This stuff smells like cookie dough and my horse eats either in meal form or he will try and grab the tube out of my hand. Taste great and works - what a concept

I can't say enough about this expensive stuff ($90/month The vet was here for another horse December 18th. Free-of-charge, he re-examined all my horses because they're up there in years and all have an "issue".

The vet told me to keep my colicy horse on the Succeed because it seems to be doing its job. Also to keep feeding his feed pan stuff three times a day, even though it's only rice bran and some timothy/alfalfa cubes in the AM because he is now a hard keeper.

1.6 Plenty of quality grass hay and if hay is in short supply buy straight timothy pellets as a filler. You could measure out one dry pound and soak them a little bit to get more moisture into his gut. These horses need a lot of moisture in their digestive system. I wet everything that goes into the feed pan, each and every time.

Just feed one pound at a time as it seems my horse cannot handle much more than 1 - 1-1/2 pounds of something in his feed pan, at one time.

It's not as complex as it sounds - I am sorry I'm not good at explaining things.

The bottom line is feed him more often but little amounts, get him off anything grain and soy, lots of good hay, and Succeed, even it's only to get him thru the winter months.

Do not deworm this horse without doing fecals and let the vet recommend what to use. Naturally the horse I am talking about is my only horse that shed enough to need wormed. The vet told me to wait until our cold & fickle weather levels out to worm him and to use pure Ivermectin. Worming happens next week if the weatherman is correct.

I hope this helps and best of luck getting him squared away
Great advice! We went through something similar with our mare. I would like to add one thing, measure/weigh everything you give your horse. If you feed 4x a day make sure all feedings are equal. It doesn't take much variance to throw these guys off.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-04-2013, 01:56 PM
  #10
Yearling
The only thing I disagree with there is the deworming. If you live in an area with high prevalence of tapeworms, yo uneed to deworm at least once a year anyway with something that will deal with those. If you have deer, you probably have tapes. Also encysted strongyles are a big dangerous problem as well. I give Quest once a year and Quest Plus ohnce a year to be absolutely SURE my horse is cleaned out and free of those two things. Ivemectin based dewormers do not kill encysted strongyles. Only a powerpak or Quest will. Fecals wont show either.

ETA, Encysted Strongyles are particularly insidious. They really damage the digestive system and Can be the cause of colic as well as mal-absorption and the damage over time done can end up being the horses death. I will always preventatively deworm for these two things until there is research to prove something else is better. My vet agrees with me.
     

Tags
colic, colicing, habitual colic

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Neighbor's horse is colicing, and no one is home Taffy Clayton Horse Health 18 07-13-2012 07:08 PM
Colicing horse??? Need advice fast please xilikeggs0 Horse Health 4 12-27-2011 10:06 PM
Mare colicing now! Help! Urgent! Update: Sadly, She didnt' make it. Cocoa Horse Health 34 09-06-2011 12:27 PM
Horse was colicing at the ranch today. ???? HalfPass Horse Health 9 06-26-2009 11:10 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0